Education News Roundup: Feb. 9, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Ed Week looks at a bill that would require Utah educators to pass a pedagogy test.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92R (Ed Week)

Rep. Chaffetz talks with KSL about the bill he is co-sponsoring to eliminate the U.S. Department of Education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92G (KSL)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/92J (NPR)

AP lays out just what the Secretary of Education does.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92L (AP)

There’s a new phishing scam targeting schools and districts in search of employee information.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92M (Ed Week)
or more information
http://gousoe.uen.org/92N (IRS)

————————————————————
TODAY’S HEADLINES
————————————————————

UTAH

Utah Lawmakers Look to Institute Test of Teaching Skills

Parents would play greater role in addressing bullying under bill approved by committee

Lawmakers debate bill to extend electric vehicle tax credits, then phase them out

Utah Senate approves call to shrink Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument
Twenty years later > A generation after President Clinton’s designation, Utah legislators want a second look.

Debate Over Student Restraint Returns To Utah Legislature

Lawmakers debate using VW settlement funds to replace old school buses

Discontent, disconnect on display at Ogden town hall with Gov. Herbert

Chaffetz on co-sponsoring bill: ‘We simply don’t need the Department of Education’

Davis School Board talks input for new teaching model

Davis High School parking issue spurs debate in Kaysville

West Valley teen composes symphony performed at his high school

Three Utah County principals win state award

Top ten MATHCOUNTS winners vie to compete at state

Worker Shortage Slowed School Construction
Legacy Elementary To Open Six Months Late

Second student accuses Utah County teacher of unlawful sexual activity

Logan City School District to add snow days to end of school year

Accomplished high school seniors represent Cache Valley as 2017 Sterling Scholars

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Don’t let latest incident tarnish all teachers

A new education secretary with no experience

Rubber stamped

We deserve nonpartisan elections for the Utah State Board of Ed

The DeVos Apocalypse
Charters are eroding the Democratic urban base of teachers and black parents

If you care about our public schools and our democracy, beware of Betsy DeVos and her vouchers

President Trump leads the charge on school choice
Advocacy for parental choice in education will help African-American youth excel.

By Getting Rid Of Education Department, Trump Can Fulfill Reagan’s Wish

Does Religion Have a Place in Public Schools?
“The question of what to do with religion in school-choice programs is how, or whether, to keep the baby while ditching the bathwater.”

NATION

A Look at the Job of Education Secretary

Phishing Scammers Target Schools for Employee Info, School Business Association Says

Revenge of the Lunch Lady
How an unassuming bureaucrat outsmarted Jamie Oliver and pulled off an honest-to-god miracle in one of America’s unhealthiest cities.

 

————————————————————
UTAH NEWS
————————————————————

Utah Lawmakers Look to Institute Test of Teaching Skills

A few months after Utah policymakers created an alternative pathway to teaching that would allow people with no teaching experience to take the helm of classrooms, some state lawmakers are looking to require educators to pass an exam to prove that they can teach before getting a full license.
Senate bill 78, which won unanimous approval from the Utah legislature’s Senate education committee, would compel the state board of education to “establish a teacher pedagogical assessment that is performance based and assesses an individual’s pedagogical skills,” but the bill would leave it up to the board to decide which test is best.
One former college president raved about the bill to the Deseret News.
“I think this is a really important step to ensure that every single teacher who steps into a classroom in Utah is a highly effective teacher that can best support our children,” F. Ann Millner, the president of Weber State University in Ogden, Utah, told the newspaper. “It’s kind of interesting we’ve not really had this in place for the teaching profession. We’ve had it on the content side. We’ve not had that on what’s really important, their ability to teach.”
But not everyone is happy about the proposed legislation. The state’s teachers’ union and some education school professors have expressed concern that the bill would create an unequal playing field for teachers certified through traditional teacher preparation programs and those who entered the classroom under the alternative certification plan created last summer.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92R (Ed Week)

Parents would play greater role in addressing bullying under bill approved by committee

SALT LAKE CITY – Parents would take a larger role in combatting bullying in changes to Utah law contemplated under SB161, which was approved Wednesday afternoon by the Senate Education Committee.
The legislation, sponsored by Sen. Luz Escamilla, D-Salt Lake City, calls on school districts statewide to update their hazing and bullying policies in several ways, including a new requirement that employees, students and parents sign a statement annually acknowledging they understand the policy.
Parents need to play a role in spreading awareness about bullying and taking ownership of the problem, Escamilla said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92o (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/92E (KTVX)

 

Debate Over Student Restraint Returns To Utah Legislature

Complaints of unnecessary physical force used against Utah students have prompted a bill to clarify what should and shouldn’t happen in a classroom. Lee Hale reports.
House Bill 92 states that teachers can physically restrain a student who is causing harm to themselves or someone else in the classroom.
But, when the student is only causing damage to classroom property, the bill requires that teachers physically guide the student rather than restrain them. Basically, using just enough touch to escort them out of the classroom.
The bill’s sponsor, Democratic Representative Carol Spackman Moss was a teacher herself and has experience with aggressive student outbursts in class.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92K (KUER)

Lawmakers debate bill to extend electric vehicle tax credits, then phase them out

SALT LAKE CITY – Lingering concerns over the electric vehicle state tax credit are sending the sponsor of a legislative proposal back to talks with his colleagues and others to possibly reach more compromises.
HB29, sponsored by Rep. Steve Handy, R-Layton, seeks to extend the tax credit that lapsed at the end of 2016 but gradually phase it out by 2022.
Handy said the measure is intended to offer a modest stimulation of electric vehicle purchases throughout Utah, without a substantial subsidy, with an eye toward getting pollution out of the air and cleaner cars on the road.
The bill requires a yearly report to analyze impacts of the tax credit and caps the financial harm to the education fund at $125,000.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92p (DN)

 

Utah Senate approves call to shrink Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument
Twenty years later > A generation after President Clinton’s designation, Utah legislators want a second look.

At 1.88 million acres, Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is larger than the combined footprints of the state’s “Mighty 5” national parks and Cedar Breaks National Monument.
That’s too big, according to a resolution approved Wednesday by the Utah Senate after passage last week in the House.
HCR12 calls on Utah’s federal delegation to support a reduction or modification of the monument, which was created by then-President Bill Clinton in 1996.
“Twenty years later, why shouldn’t we still have those discussions about what makes sense to be designated as a monument?” Senate Majority Leader Ralph Okerlund, R-Monroe, said. “The locals do not support it, and they will not until we finally get to a point where they have some ability to be able to participate in the process.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/92k (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/92l (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/92m (UP)

 

Lawmakers debate using VW settlement funds to replace old school buses

SALT LAKE CITY – The Volkswagen emissions settlement has become a blessing and a curse in a tight budget year as some state lawmakers see room for a clean-fuel bus measure while others want to wait and see how far the money can go.
The $32 million settlement awarded to the state may be enough to move forward with a resolution to prioritize the replacement of Utah’s school bus fleet from outdated diesel-burning vehicles to a clean-fuel alternative.
HCR5, sponsored by Rep. Steve Handy, R-Layton, has new life with the awarding of reparations from the Volkswagen settlement. Handy, who has attempted for the past four years to pass similar legislation, put forth the measure as a nonbinding resolution, hoping to prioritize the replacement of school buses as one use for the settlement funds.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92n (DN)

 

Discontent, disconnect on display at Ogden town hall with Gov. Herbert

OGDEN – A Tuesday town hall held at Weber State University drew boos and applause as audience members responded to elected officials on a host of issues including education, air quality, Utah’s public lands, police pay and more.
About 150 people packed the Dumke Legacy Hall to ask pointed questions of Gov. Gary Herbert, state Sen. Ann Millner and Representatives Kelly Miles, Dixon Pitcher and Logan Wilde.

The “Our Schools Now” initiative – a citizens push to place a seven-eighths of one percent personal income tax increase on the 2018 ballot to boost teacher pay and shore up Utah’s classrooms – was also discussed.
“We’ve all been debating this at the ‘big house,’ and they’ve given us a lot of tools,” said Rep. Wilde, a Republican from Croydon, noting the ballot measure excludes corporate income tax. “There are some issues we need to address, but is the value to your students there? That’s what we need to weigh … and if it fails, what’s it going to say to our teachers?”
Lindsay Huss, a teacher at Northridge High School, said highly qualified teachers in Utah are exiting the profession because of low pay.
“Any help would be important to us. We could use anything,” Huss said Tuesday.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92T (OSE)

 

Chaffetz on co-sponsoring bill: ‘We simply don’t need the Department of Education’

SALT LAKE CITY – Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, defended Wednesday co-sponsoring a bill that seeks to do away with the U.S. Department of Education.
HR 899 was introduced Tuesday by Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Kentucky, and is composed of just one line: “The Department of Education shall terminate on December 31, 2018.” Chaffetz co-sponsored the bill along with six other representatives.
Chaffetz defended his position Wednesday, saying that states should decide how public schools are taught.
“We simply don’t need the Department of Education,” he said in an interview with KSL. “We in Utah, we know how to educate our kids. We don’t need some bureaucrat in Washington, D.C. to tell us how to do it. I think if you want to have the best governance, the best programs for our kids, keep that money and that administration as close to the people as you can.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/92G (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/92J (NPR)

Davis School Board talks input for new teaching model

BOUNTIFUL – Davis School District officials said they value stakeholder input as the district moves forward with a boundary study and implements a new classroom model at two elementary schools.
At a board retreat in early February, district staff presented plans to introduce fusion learning at first and second grade classrooms at Centerville Elementary School and Wasatch Elementary School next fall. The model puts a larger number of students in rotating work groups with one teacher and two full-time teaching assistants.
At a board of education meeting Tuesday, Superintendent Reid Newey said it would be important implement the new teaching model carefully, but “also have an urgency to it.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/92u (OSE)

 

Davis High School parking issue spurs debate in Kaysville

KAYSVILLE – Generally, Jana Acton has no problem with the Davis High School students who sometimes park on the street in front of her home, unable to find a spot in the nearby school lot.
“Most of the time, I don’t mind it at all,” said the Kaysville woman, who lives on 200 South in the residential neighborhood just north of the school grounds.
On occasion, though, students park perilously close to her driveway, making it tricky to back onto the street. And though she doesn’t make a big stink out of it – student parking is technically prohibited in the zone – enough of her neighbors have broached the issue of off-campus student parking that it has become a focus of discussion.
Now, after on-and-off debate dating to early January – including lively discussion at a pair of Kaysville City Council meetings – Kaysville City Manager Shayne Scott says officials have come up with a tentative fix. He just hopes the plan, which received preliminary support at the council’s Feb. 2 meeting, passes muster when officials formally weigh in, probably at the next meeting on Feb. 16.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92s (OSE)

 

West Valley teen composes symphony performed at his high school

WEST VALLEY CITY – Young Mozart, already a renowned performer, composed his first symphony at the tender age of eight. Just six years older than Mozart, West Valley teen Jarom Oliphant completed his own soon after his 14th birthday.
Oliphant, 15, began writing what he has now titled “The Symphony of Life” when he was 13, and finished the composition shortly after he turned 14. The young musician will see the symphony performed tonight at 7 p.m. at Granger High School in West Valley City where he is a student and a member of the school’s band.
“In grade school, he had a lot of behavioral problems,” Oliphant’s father, Chris Oliphant, said. “He was diagnosed with ADHD and ODD, which is Oppositional Defiance Disorder. Then right about the end of grade school, around fifth grade, he would pick up an instrument (and) would be able to do things with it that sounded good within an hour, and it didn’t matter the instrument.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92H (KSL)

 

Three Utah County principals win state award

Jarod Sites took a picture of his faculty with him to accept his 2017 Secondary Principal of the Year award.
“It’s awkward for me because it’s really an award for our school and our community,” Sites, the principal of Dixon Middle School in Provo, said. “The faculty does the heavy lifting.”
Utah County schools claimed two state Secondary Principal of the Year awards and one state Assistant Principal of the Year award from the Utah Association of Secondary School Principals.
Bart Peery, principal of Salem Hills High School, was also named a Secondary Principal of the Year and Ryan Nield, assistant principal at American Fork High School, won the state Assistant Principal of the Year competition.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92x (PDH)

 

Top ten MATHCOUNTS winners vie to compete at state

Several area students placed in the Northern Utah chapter contest of the MATHCOUNTS Competition Series.
Forty-four students competed Saturday, Feb. 4, at Weber State University and winners were from schools in the Davis School District, Logan City School District and area charter schools.
Northern Utah MATHCOUNTS Coordinator Natalie Little said the top two winning teams will compete at the state level along with top qualifiers from the current Top 10 list who will be determined at continued competitions throughout February.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92w (OSE)

 

Worker Shortage Slowed School Construction
Legacy Elementary To Open Six Months Late

ST. GEORGE, Utah — A construction worker shortage in southern Utah postponed the opening of a new public school by six months.
Legacy Elementary should have been finished in the middle of last year, but a series of large-scale construction projects lured subcontractors away from the school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92F (KTVX)

 

Second student accuses Utah County teacher of unlawful sexual activity

PAYSON, Utah – A second male student has contacted police to report a teacher in Utah County provided him with alcohol before engaging in unlawful sexual activity with the teen.
Sarah Lindsay Lewis, 27, is a teacher at an alternative high school in Spanish Fork, and last month she was booked into jail on charges of furnishing alcohol to a minor and unlawful sexual activity with a minor.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92I (KSTU)

 

Logan City School District to add snow days to end of school year

The Logan City School District has decided to add snow makeup days on to the end of the year in a move mirroring a recent decision by the Cache County School District.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92z (LHJ)

 

Accomplished high school seniors represent Cache Valley as 2017 Sterling Scholars

Throughout the state of Utah, the annual Deseret News/KSL Sterling Scholar Awards recognize outstanding high school seniors each year who have made notable achievements in one of 14 academic and vocational categories including English, mathematics, social science, science, world languages, computer technology, skilled and technical sciences education, family and consumer sciences, business and marketing, speech/theater arts/forensics, visual arts, dance, instrumental music and vocal performance.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92A (CVD)

 

————————————————————
OPINION & COMMENTARY
————————————————————

Don’t let latest incident tarnish all teachers
(Provo) Daily Herald editorial

Certain people in certain professions are historically afforded an immense measure of trust by the general public.
One of those groups – teachers – has unfortunately taken a hit locally in recent days thanks to an unfortunate phenomena that seems to be picking up steam not only in Utah, but throughout the nation.
We’re talking about teachers reportedly becoming involved in inappropriate, criminal sexual relationships with their students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92y

 

A new education secretary with no experience
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner commentary by columnist MEG SANDERS

A new education secretary with no experience. A new education secretary with no experience. A new education secretary with no experience.
Like a pathetic daily affirmation, I repeat this over and over since it goes against everything I’ve learned in life.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92t

Rubber stamped
(St. George) Spectrum letter from Joan Blewett

I was one of the hundreds of thousands who phoned and emailed their U.S. senators over the Betsy DeVos nomination to be education secretary.
I hoped to change Republican Sen. Dean Heller’s mind to vote for her confirmation. The Senate vote split 50-50 and Vice President Pence cast the deciding vote for the confirmation of DeVos. It was disheartening.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92B

 

We deserve nonpartisan elections for the Utah State Board of Ed
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Sheryl Allen

It’s actually pretty simple. Our State Board of Education members should abide by Utah Code which requires that boards shall design their school programs, that are suggested by generally accepted scientific standards of evidence, to focus on the core standards for Utah public schools. …”
But if board members are partisan, they are obligated to pay close attention to their party platforms. When they seek to become their party’s candidate, they will be judged by their adherence to that platform.
State Board of Education members should not be considering political party platforms in their decisions. They should be considering the educational needs of our children. That’s been the guiding principle in Utah education for decades.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92v

 

The DeVos Apocalypse
Charters are eroding the Democratic urban base of teachers and black parents
Wall Street Journal commentary by columnist Daniel Henninger

The extraordinary battle over Betsy DeVos ‘s nomination to be secretary of education is the defining event of the Trump presidency’s early days.
As presented, the DeVos confirmation appeared to be a standard partisan conflict between Democrats and Republicans, or in the conventional update, all that’s good and all that’s Trump.
But something deeper was at stake here, which is why the Democrats raised the nomination for a second-level cabinet post to a political apocalypse.
The person who introduced Mrs. DeVos at her confirmation hearing was former Democratic Sen. Joe Lieberman from Connecticut, arguably the last of the unequivocal Democratic moderates. In the confirmation vote, every Democrat opposed Mrs. DeVos, including Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota.
The issue presumably at the center of this nomination fight is the future of the education of black children who live in urban neighborhoods.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92q

 

If you care about our public schools and our democracy, beware of Betsy DeVos and her vouchers
Los Angeles Times op-ed by Barbara Miner, author of “Lessons from the Heartland: A Turbulent Half-Century of Public Education in an Iconic American City”

The confirmation hearings for Betsy DeVos provided an inordinate amount of drama: guns and grizzlies, an all-night talkathon on the Senate floor, and Vice President Mike Pence’s tie-breaking vote — and with good reason.
DeVos, now confirmed as secretary of Education, is not just another inexperienced member of the president’s Cabinet. She is an ideologue with a singular educational passion — replacing our system of democratically controlled public schools with a universal voucher program that privileges private and religious ones.
If you care about our public schools and our democracy, you should be worried.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92Q

 

President Trump leads the charge on school choice
Advocacy for parental choice in education will help African-American youth excel.
USA Today op-ed by Omarosa Manigault, assistant to the president and director of communications for the Office of Public Liaison

With Black History Month underway, people all over the country are taking the opportunity to celebrate the lives and contributions of courageous African-American leaders – from Frederick Douglass and Madam C.J. Walker, to Martin Luther King Jr. and Clarence Thomas.

I am proud to serve under a president who has made it clear that the forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no more, including – and I would argue especially – African Americans.
Education is the ultimate equalizer in our society. I say that from personal experience
http://gousoe.uen.org/92r

 

By Getting Rid Of Education Department, Trump Can Fulfill Reagan’s Wish
Investor’s Business Daily op-ed by DENNIS CUDDY, author of “NEA: Grab for Power”

On Feb. 7, Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., with co-sponsors from seven states, introduced HR899 to eliminate the Department of Education.
As the one who wrote the first draft of President Reagan’s published essay, “Overview of Education Reform Issues,” I know of his desire to reverse President Jimmy Carter’s establishment of the department in 1979. If Congress passes the bill, President Trump can fulfill President Reagan’s desire by signing the legislation.
When the debate over establishing the Education Department occurred in 1979, Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, D-N.Y., asked, “Will children learn more? Will schools and colleges teach better? Will vital resources make their way through the bureaucracy and into the classroom?”
And he placed in the Congressional Record editorials from many leading newspapers opposing an Education Department.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92P

 

Does Religion Have a Place in Public Schools?
“The question of what to do with religion in school-choice programs is how, or whether, to keep the baby while ditching the bathwater.”
Atlantic commentary by BENJAMIN JUSTICE and COLIN MACLEOD, authors of Have a Little Faith: Religion, Democracy, and the American Public School

From the standpoint of democratic theory, the basic problem with school choice is this: Religious belief and affiliation can be vital sites of civic learning for many Americans. In their temples, mosques, and megachurches, Americans learn to cooperate, organize, identify, and engage with social problems. These skills help them develop the kind of bonding capital that forms the basis of a democracy; from that platform, citizens can develop the bridging capital that allows them to identify with and engage civil society as a whole.
On the other hand, some religious groups preach beliefs and false information that are hostile to fellow citizens and dangerous to civil society. Any old bonding capital is not good enough. As John Dewey once observed, belonging to a gang may provide a member with opportunities for connection and growth, but toward the pursuit of destructive ends. The question of what to do with religion in school-choice programs is how, or whether, to keep the baby while ditching the bathwater.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92O

 

————————————————————-
NATIONAL NEWS
————————————————————-

A Look at the Job of Education Secretary
Associated Press

As Betsy DeVos begins her job as Education Secretary, some of her opponents fear she will radically upend the entire American school system, while her supporters hope she will quickly push through what they see as much-needed reforms. Here is a look at what the Education Secretary can and cannot do.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92L

 

Phishing Scammers Target Schools for Employee Info, School Business Association Says
Education Week

The Internal Revenue Service has warned school business officials to beware of a phishing scam targeting schools’ payroll or human resource departments, in an effort to have them release employees’ confidential information, according to the Association of School Business Officials International.
The association alerted members to the scam in the notice on the organization’s website. John Musso, ASBO’s executive director, said in an interview that he could not specifically identify districts that have been targeted, but noted that it must be “more than a handful” to come to the attention of the IRS, and for the government agency to contact his association.
Besides schools, the scammers are targeting tribal organizations, nonprofits, and other employers, the association indicated in its announcement to members, the IRS said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/92M

More information
http://gousoe.uen.org/92N (IRS)

 

Revenge of the Lunch Lady
How an unassuming bureaucrat outsmarted Jamie Oliver and pulled off an honest-to-god miracle in one of America’s unhealthiest cities.
Huffington Post

In the fall of 2009, the British celebrity chef Jamie Oliver arrived in Huntington, West Virginia, which had recently been named the unhealthiest city in America. Huntingtonians were suffering in record numbers from diabetes and heart disease. They were being destroyed by the mountains of burgers and fries and nuggets that filled their restaurants, schools, refrigerators and arteries. They were fulfilling the prophecy that this generation of children would be the first to live shorter lives than their parents. Oliver had come to save them-and to film a season of his new reality show, “Food Revolution.”
The first thing he saw when he walked into the kitchen of Central City Elementary School was the breakfast pizza. It looked like you remember school pizza: a rectangle of bleached dough spackled with red sauce and melted cheese. What made it breakfast, presumably, was that each slice also had crumbles of sausage scattered across it. That, and it was 7:40 a.m.
Oliver was disgusted by the school’s freezers (an “Aladdin’s cave of processed crap”), by the “luminous” strawberry milk that kids poured on their cereal and by the instant potato pearls that tasted like “starchy fluff with off nuts in it.” To his astonishment, all of these foods were considered part of a healthy diet by the standards of the U.S. government.
“This is where it’s at, guys,” he said as he strode through the cafeteria. “This is the future of America sitting here, having pizza for breakfast.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/92j

 

————————————————————
CALENDAR
————————————————————

USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

February 9:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00001442.htm

Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environmental Quality Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00001412.htm

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings
1 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

House Education Committee meeting
3 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HEDU0209.ag.htm

House Business and Labor Committee meeting
3 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HBUS0209.ag.htm

February 10:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

Related posts:

Comments are closed.