Education News Roundup: Feb. 27, 2017

Utah State Capitol

Utah State Capitol

Today’s Top Picks:

Bill to halt funding flow from K-12 to higher ed hits a hurdle.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dk (SLT)

House votes to eliminate letter grades for schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dq (SLT)

State Charter School Board votes to put Franklin Discovery Academy on probation.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dm (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9dn (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9do (PDH)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9dp (PDH)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9dD (KUTV)

Parents of transgendered children ask for a meeting with Trump administration officials.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9di (WaPo)

Ed Week looks at what schools can and cannot do to protect undocumented students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dL (Ed Week)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Bill to stop the flow of funding from Utah K-12 schools to colleges hits committee roadblock

Lawmakers racing to pass the budget before Friday

Details emerge on Our Schools Now

House votes to eliminate letter grades for schools
Practice makes it hard to attract teachers to low-performing schools, says sponsor.

Utah Bill Would Offer Teachers Protections from Student, Parent Bullies

House votes to give power, independence to School Children’s Trust director

Lawmakers may turn out lights on solar panel tax credits
Legislators say the money saved would be spent on education

Board places Utah County charter school on probation over student safety, financial mismanagement
Education » Charter school must fix operations, safety lapses by June per formal reprimand.

Logan elementary principals say shuffle has been a success

Duchesne teacher charged with unlawful sex with teen

Utah students organize public hearing on climate change

More than 250 students participate in Nebo District Chess Tournament

Iron County School District in Utah to have all it’s High Schools designated as “Safe Sport Schools”

High five! Provo student recognized for her spirit in mentoring, serving fellow students

Weber School District boundary change proposals draw ire from some parents

Activists gather in SLC to protest Trump’s recent legislation on transgendered students

Canyons School District grad helps stars look their best at the Oscars

Canyons announces new administrative appointments

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Is it time for an education tax increase?

Education research taken to illogical extremes

Sex ed does a body good

Donald Trump’s First Speech to Congress and Education: Four Things to Watch

NATION

Parents of transgender children request meeting with Trump, DeVos, Sessions

LGBT Issues Present Trump with Loyalty Test

How Much Can Schools Protect Undocumented Students?

Arizona may face another billion-dollar school lawsuit
Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey’s road map to improve education faces a detour that could send the state’s budget off a fiscal cliff

Education publisher Pearson reports biggest loss in its history
Pre-tax losses soar to £2.6bn as group – planning to sell its Penguin Random House stake – is hit by slump in US textbook sales

Is Jupiter’s 50-year powder puff football tradition finally over?

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Bill to stop the flow of funding from Utah K-12 schools to colleges hits committee roadblock

A proposal to cap the amount of income tax revenue awarded to higher education faced a cool reception in the Senate Education Committee on Monday.
The committee voted to move on without a vote on SB255, which would place a five-year moratorium on expanding the pool of Education Fund money diverted from elementary, middle and high schools to public colleges and universities.
“Any growth in the income tax would be retained by K-12 education,” bill sponsor Sen. Howard Stephenson, R-Draper, said.
Utah’s constitution requires income tax revenue to be spent on public education. In 1996 that was broadened to include higher education, previously funded with sales tax collections.
The amendment led to a two-decade shift in state spending that saw higher education increasingly supported by the income tax, allowing lawmakers to use sales tax revenue for other public services.
But that shift has also diminished the funding available for Utah’s elementary, middle and high schools, which are currently the lowest funded in the nation on a per-student basis.
Stephenson said he is looking at several reform options to address education funding, in part as a response to the Our Schools Now ballot initiative, which plans to ask voters in 2018 to approve a seven-eights of 1 percent increase to Utah’s income tax rate.
He described SB255 as a “shell,” saying the higher education funding cap could be swapped out for other proposals based on the will of lawmakers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dk (SLT)

 

Lawmakers racing to pass the budget before Friday


The rest of the budget won’t be a cake walk either. Even though lawmakers found out they have about $88 million more in ongoing money than they initially expected, there’s still not a lot of money to go around.
“The big question is how much money we can get into education,” says Okerlund.
The appropriations committee tasked with setting the budget for public schools is asking for about $170 million this year, which includes a 3% boost in the WPU. Each percentage increase in the WPU translates to about $30 million. Add in another $68 million to cover the cost of the 10,000 new students, and you’re already in the neighborhood of $158 million. Considering that lawmakers have $372 million in ongoing funding to allocate this year, $170 million is a big chunk.
“If we boost the WPU in that 3-3 1/2% neighborhood, we’re close to $170 million,” says Okerlund.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dg (UP)

 

Details emerge on Our Schools Now

Performance measures like student proficiency and improved test scores should play a role in how Utah allocates any new funds generated through a proposed income tax increase, according to a draft plan released Monday by organizers behind the Our Schools Now ballot initiative.
Our Schools Now, a campaign launched late last year by some prominent names in Utah business and others, proposes raising the state income tax by 7/8 of a percent to benefit the state’s public schools, which rank last among the 50 states in per-pupil funding.
Estimates suggest the proposal could raise some $750 million annually, or about $1,000 per student. The state currently spends about $6,500 per student.
To determine how that new money should be allocated, Our Schools Now organizers say they have been meeting with educators, parents, business owners and others to discuss development of a more detailed plan.
The draft describes a requirement for every school to develop a “Teacher and Student Success” plan, with the threat of losing some funding if they can’t either maintain testing proficiency, graduation rates and college-readiness rates or to show regular year-to-year improvement.
The new money would be kept in a special account, separate from other education funds, and allocated only in line with each school-specific plan.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dA (SGS)

 

House votes to eliminate letter grades for schools
Practice makes it hard to attract teachers to low-performing schools, says sponsor.

The House voted Friday to end the practice of assigning letter grades to public schools.
“We have put so much pressure and so many labels on the schools,” said the bill’s sponsor, Rep. Marie Poulson, “that it has a very demoralizing effect and we can’t get teachers to work with our kids who need the most help.”
The House voted 54-18 to pass her HB241, and sent it to the Senate.
Poulson, D-Cottonwood Heights, a teacher, is proposing to maintain a statewide school accountability system, but include additional criteria.
Rather than measure school performance based on standardized testing, her bill would use additional metrics like Advanced Placement participation and elementary reading levels to rate schools, without a letter and with consideration given to campuses with high levels of at-risk students.
Since it was first approved by lawmakers in 2011, Utah’s school grading law has been altered every year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dq (SLT)

 

Utah Bill Would Offer Teachers Protections from Student, Parent Bullies

Utah State Representative Marie Poulson has a harrowing tale from her time as a junior high school teacher. Poulson said she had to chase down a student who brazenly stole her purse. After turning him in, she said she started to receive abusive phone calls from his parents, who blamed her for their son’s subsequent legal troubles. The calls continued for the rest of the school year. Poulson said she had little recourse; she tried to get the student out of her class but her pleas went unanswered.
The Democrat from suburban Salt Lake City told her story as part of her testimony in support of a bill that would require school districts and charter schools to set up a grievance process for school employees who are being bullied by students or parents, reports The Salt Lake Tribune.
After receiving unanimous approval from both chambers of the Utah legislature, the bill-which united the often feuding Utah Education Association, the state teachers’ union and an affiliate of the National Education Association, with state Republicans-now only awaits the governor’s signature.
But just how pervasive is the problem?
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dO (Ed Week)

 

House votes to give power, independence to School Children’s Trust director

The director of Utah’s School Children’s Trust would receive independent authority and the potential for unlimited six-year terms under a bill approved Monday by the Utah House of Representatives.
The Utah Board of Education currently hires – and is able to fire – the director of the School Children’s Trust Section, which oversees distribution of education funding from the $2.3 billion Permanent State School Fund.
But under HB291, the school board would appoint the section’s director, with a change allowed only if the director vacates the position or if a majority of the school board votes to remove the director due to “neglect of fiduciary duty, malfeasance, gross negligence, or incapacitation.”
Bill sponsor Rep. Mike Noel, R-Kanab, said the bill would insulate the director from politics, allowing them to focus on the benefit of Utah’s schoolchildren and protect against “hanky panky” between education managers and special interests.
“It’s needed to make sure we have an independent director of the School Children’s Trust Section,” Noel said of the bill.
The current School Children’s Trust Director, Tim Donaldson, was named to the position in June 2013. Under the bill, Donaldson would be secure in a six-year term, ending in 2023, with the option to continue his tenure for additional terms.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dl (SLT)

 

Lawmakers may turn out lights on solar panel tax credits
Legislators say the money saved would be spent on education

The sun may be setting on the lucrative income tax credits for Utah residents who install solar panels on their homes.
Currently, homeowners can receive up to a $2,000 tax break for installing residential solar panel systems, but H.B. 23 seeks to phase out the credits by the end of 2021. The legislation, sponsored by Rep. Jeremy Peterson, a Republican from Ogden, would cut the tax credit amount to $1,600 in 2018 and decrease it $400 each year until eventually hitting zero.
The bill, which lawmakers are touting as a compromise with the solar industry because it would also remove a cap on the total amount of annual funding available for the tax credits through 2021, has drawn broad support from Republican legislators who say the millions of dollars saved could be spent on other efforts like education. It passed the Utah House of Representatives earlier this month and was approved by the Senate Thursday. As of Friday morning, it awaited the signature of Gov. Gary Herbert.
However, Lisa Yoder, Summit County’s sustainability manager, said the legislation could slow local sustainability efforts at a time when hundreds of residents in the area are choosing to install solar panels. The tax credits, she added, have been vital in fostering the growth of the industry in Summit County.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dh (PR)

 

Board places Utah County charter school on probation over student safety, financial mismanagement
Education » Charter school must fix operations, safety lapses by June per formal reprimand.

Vineyard’s Franklin Discovery Academy was reprimanded Saturday, making the school’s future uncertain beyond the current academic year.
The state charter school board voted to place the Franklin Discovery under formal probation, giving administrators and staff until June to address a series of perceived lapses in financial management, campus operations and student safety.
“I would like to see if the current board and the current staff can make this work,” state charter school board member Dean Brockbank said. “I feel confident the students are safe going back to school on Monday.”
The Utah County charter school was rocked this week after allegations surfaced that a student had been inappropriately targeted by a former employee and another had been groped by her classmates.
State school board staff visited the school, and on Friday described to board members a campus in which students are left unsupervised, instructional time is minimal and safety hazards – including combustible material and electrical wiring – are prevalent.
The state charter school board called for an additional meeting Saturday in order to allow for public comment and additional information before taking action against the school
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dm (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9dn (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9do (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9dp (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9dD (KUTV)

 

Logan elementary principals say shuffle has been a success

Logan City School District Superintendent Frank Schofield shook things up this school year when in 2016 he decided to shuffle all six elementary principals to new schools.
Some principals had been at their schools for 10 years or more and had developed lasting relationships with teachers and parents in the community. Schofield said it was a tough decision, but it’s important to create movement.
He said a supervisor once told him when a principal first walks into a school, they notice everything – good and bad. After several years, a principal might start to miss areas for growth and just see the positive aspects, because they were part of putting them in place.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dz (LHJ)

 

Duchesne teacher charged with unlawful sex with teen

ROOSEVELT – A former schoolteacher in Duchesne County is accused of having an illegal relationship with a 16-year-old girl while he was still a teacher.
Noah Christopher Behunin, 33, was charged Feb. 8 in 8th District Court with unlawful sexual conduct with a 16-year-old, a second-degree felony. He was scheduled to make an initial appearance on Monday, but that hearing was postponed until March 20, according to court records.
Behunin was an automotive instructor at the Uintah Basin Applied Technology College. The activity happened on Dec. 5 and Jan. 3, according to charging documents.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dt (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9dB (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9dF (KSL)

 

Utah students organize public hearing on climate change

SALT LAKE CITY – Hundreds of Utah residents crowded a Capitol meeting room Thursday to support an informal public hearing for a resolution recognizing a consensus on climate change.
Sen. Jim Dabakis, D-Salt Lake City, agreed to host the members of the public after his resolution to “expresses commitment to create and support solutions and studies to address the causes and effects of climate change” was blocked by the Senate Environmental Resources Committee.
SJR9 sought to overturn a 2010 resolution of the Utah Legislature urging the Environmental Protection Agency to halt carbon dioxide regulations at the concern of a recession economy and disputed scientific consensus on the issue of climate change.
Dabakis said several high school and college students urged him to hold the informal public hearing. He broadcast the hearing live on Facebook.
“The scientific substantiation of climate change has occurred,” said Piper Christian, a junior at Logan High School. “Prudent, fact-based stewardship of our economy and environment is a critical responsibility.”
Christian organized the event with her older brother, Logan, a student at Utah State University.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dv (DN)

 

More than 250 students participate in Nebo District Chess Tournament

Taya Rau, an 8-year-old second grader from Mapleton Elementary, loves playing chess games with her father. Those games are helping prep her for tournaments like the one she participated in on Saturday.
Approximately 250 K-12 students in the Nebo School District participated in the annual Nebo District Chess Tournament held this year at Cherry Creek School in Springville.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dx (PDH)

 

Iron County School District in Utah to have all it’s High Schools designated as “Safe Sport Schools”

IRON COUNTY, Utah – The Safe Sports School Award from the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA) recognizes secondary schools around the country that take comprehensive steps to keep their athletes free from injuries.
And the Iron County School District is the first school district in the state to have all of its high schools designated as Safe Sport Schools. Intermountain Sports Medicine manages the athletic trainers at each high school, which include Mason Smith at Canyon View High School, Ryan Huber at Parowan High School, and lead athletic trainer Melissa Mendini at Cedar High School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dM (KCSG)

High five! Provo student recognized for her spirit in mentoring, serving fellow students

Each weekday morning without fail, senior Rebekah Reno stands outside the door to her school, Freedom Preparatory, to high five and greet each student with a smile and words of encouragement.
Reno has been doing this since the school year started last year. She said it’s something that brings up the attitude of the whole school, herself included.
“I thought, ‘It’s not that hard, I get up a few minutes earlier,’ but there are some days that getting up early and standing outside in the cold doesn’t sound like something I want to do,” she said. “But then a parent will tell me that I make their student’s day and realizing that makes me realize it’s not about me, and the simple things I can do can really make a difference.”
Reno, who was recently awarded the Prudential Spirit of Community Award, said she has focused on serving others because of the effect it can have.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dy (PDH)

 

Weber School District boundary change proposals draw ire from some parents

PLEASANT VIEW – One family is considering moving if Weber School District boundary changes are approved as they were presented at a community open house Thursday.
Kevin and Angie Lee have a son who plays football for Plain City and was on track to play at Wahlquist Junior High School and Fremont High School, schools the couple attended growing up.
“We bleed blue,” Angie Lee said, referring to Fremont’s school colors.
The Lees live in a small square of land that under both boundary proposals, would send their son to Orion Junior High School and Weber High School.
Kevin Lee said the couple chose their home based on its location within Fremont High boundaries, but decided to meet with their mortgage broker Friday, Feb. 24.
“I just barely bought the house, and I’m going to have to move,” he said. “That’s why I bought that house, and I don’t see them giving me any money back for my purchase.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dw (OSE)

 

Activists gather in SLC to protest Trump’s recent legislation on transgendered students

Days after President Donald Trump ended a federal mandate directing schools to allow transgender students to use restrooms and other facilities that align with the gender they identify with, activists across the country have gathered to protest.
A group of people belonging to the Facebook group “Utah’s Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement” gathered Saturday afternoon in downtown Salt Lake City’s Gallivan Plaza to protest the decision
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dC (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9dE (KTVX)

 

Canyons School District grad helps stars look their best at the Oscars

SANDY, Utah – A Jordan High School grad is getting some attention after helping stars look their best at the Oscars.
Former Beetdigger Tim Muir styled Oscar-nominee Taylor Sheridan and his wife in hair and makeup.
Sheridan, actor-turned-writer and director, is the dark horse nominated for his role in “Hell or High Water,” an original screenplay.
Both of Muir’s parents are also part of the Canyons District family.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dG (KSTU)

 

Canyons announces new administrative appointments

SANDY – The Canyons Board of Education has approved new leadership appointments for the coming school year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9du (DN)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Is it time for an education tax increase?
Deseret News commentary by columnists Frank Pignanelli & LaVarr Webb

Utah lawmakers are exploring major changes in tax policy, in part to provide more money for education. These deliberations are taking place under the threat of an initiative petition drive by Our Schools Now (OSN) to ask voters to increase income taxes.
Legislative leadership is hoping to change Utah’s tax structure by reducing tax rates while broadening the tax base to more people and entities. Will this provide additional funding for education and push back against OSN?
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dN

 

Education research taken to illogical extremes
Salt Lake Tribune letter from William F. Anderson

I am troubled by legitimate studies showing both class size and per-pupil spending have no correlation on educational outcomes. The rigorous science behind this analysis is undeniable and is not what concerns me.
What is distressing is using such studies to continually justify the miserly funding provided to public schools in Utah as though there is no limit to how far the results of this research can be extrapolated. Despite what all this research suggests, isn’t it reasonable to assume that, at some point, class sizes and spending levels do impact student achievement? If there is absolutely no correlation between class size, per-pupil spending and educational outcomes, why not simply organize all students into the logical extreme of a single class with a single teacher?
The obvious answer is, regardless of how some choose to use valid research, at some point class size and spending levels will have an impact on student results.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ds

 

Sex ed does a body good
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Pat Sadoski

In the mid-1980s, I was a school nurse challenged with the task of ensuring children’s health care and teaching the fifth-grade girls about maturation. Remember in the mid-1980s, we had the AIDS epidemic and parents were still at that time suspicious of “sex ed.”
The district and the teachers were very welcome to help in this area and my responsibility grew to also speak to the boys about their normal maturing and about communicable diseases.
I can hardly believe that we are still so naïve as to think our youth don’t need in-depth science education of the human body now, 30 years later.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dr

 

Donald Trump’s First Speech to Congress and Education: Four Things to Watch
Education Week commentary by columnist Alyson Klein

President Donald Trump is slated to give his first big speech to Congress Tuesday. Because this is his first year in office, it’s not technically a State of the Union address. (Think of it as a pseudo-SOTU in Beltway-speak).
The speech could give the country a glimpse of education’s place in Trump’s presidency-or it could send a signal that education won’t be a major focus.
Here are four things to watch for:
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dK

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Parents of transgender children request meeting with Trump, DeVos, Sessions
Washington Post

The parents of eight transgender children from across the country have requested a meeting with President Trump and key administration officials to discuss the effect of their decision to withdraw federal guidance explaining what the nation’s public schools must do to protect transgender students.
“We are heartbroken and scared about what this means,” the parents said Friday in a letter to Trump, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. “This action exposes transgender students to harassment and discrimination in their own classrooms, places they should feel safe and able to learn.”
A White House spokesman could not immediately say whether Trump had seen the letter, but he said the president has made clear that he’s open to meeting with a variety of people to improve Americans’ lives. An Education Department spokesman did not respond to a request for comment.
The letter was signed by parents from Texas, Arizona, Florida, Michigan, Missouri, Maine and D.C. They are members of the Human Rights Campaign’s Parents for Transgender Equality Council, and many of them have become leading voices in the effort to raise awareness about and advocate for the needs of transgender people.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9di

 

LGBT Issues Present Trump with Loyalty Test
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — There was candidate Donald Trump in Colorado, waving a rainbow flag emblazoned with “LGBTs for Trump,” a photo opportunity meant to signal he was a new brand of Republican when it comes to protecting LGBT Americans.
Four months later, faced with a major decision point on the issue, Trump’s White House held up another slogan: defense of states’ rights.
The administration’s decision this week to revoke guidance on transgender students’ use of public school bathrooms was an early test of Trump’s loyalties – between the gay and lesbian community he said he supports but largely did not support him, and the social conservatives who helped drive his victory. It’s a tension Trump could find difficult to manage throughout his presidency, when the hot-button social issues he worked hard to avoid during the campaign are impossible to ignore.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dH

 

How Much Can Schools Protect Undocumented Students?
Education Week

As the Trump administration aggressively ramps up deportations of undocumented immigrants, some K-12 leaders have pledged to protect the rights and privacy of students who don’t have legal immigration status. Some vow schools are “sanctuaries” where educators won’t cooperate with authorities to identify or take action against undocumented students and families. But the fast-moving, politically charged situation has also created confusion for educators about what they can and can’t do.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dL

 

Arizona may face another billion-dollar school lawsuit
Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey’s road map to improve education faces a detour that could send the state’s budget off a fiscal cliff
(Phoenix) Arizona Republic

Less than a year after voters passed Proposition 123 to resolve a $1.6 billion lawsuit over school funding, a new, even larger education lawsuit looms – and almost nobody is talking about it.
While the first lawsuit focused on underfunding per-student payments to schools for operational costs such as teacher salaries, this latest dispute centers on nearly a decade of cuts to capital funding for textbooks, technology, buses and building maintenance. Attorneys have warned of a lawsuit for years.
Now, they say they could file one within the next month.
Gov. Doug Ducey in his budget proposal included an additional $17 million to the School Facilities Board for building maintenance, but he continued hundreds of millions of dollars in annual cuts directly to schools for other school maintenance and soft capital such as technology.
Since 2009, ongoing cuts in this area have topped $2 billion.
A lone legislative effort to boost funding has received a cursory hearing but no public vote, and will not advance. It’s unclear whether the Legislature’s budget, which is still being crafted, will offer a solution that could stop the pending lawsuit.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dj

 

Education publisher Pearson reports biggest loss in its history
Pre-tax losses soar to £2.6bn as group – planning to sell its Penguin Random House stake – is hit by slump in US textbook sales
(Manchester) Guardian

Pearson has reported a pre-tax loss of £2.6bn for 2016, the biggest in its history, after a slump at its US education operation.
The world’s largest education publisher, which in January saw almost £2bn wiped from its stock market value after issuing its fifth profit warning in two years, reported the record loss after taking a £2.55bn non-cash charge for “impairment of goodwill reflecting trading pressures” in its North American businesses.
A spokesman said the charge related mainly to historic acquisitions of Simon & Schuster Education and National Computer Systems, purchased in 1998 and 2000 respectively, as a “necessary consequence” of the lower profit expectations announced last month.
In January, the company slashed its profit forecast for this year by £180m and scrapped its target of £800m for next year. It also announced that it planned to sell its stake in the world’s largest book publisher, Penguin Random House, to strengthen its balance sheet.
The profit warning was prompted by the collapse of its US higher education business, which is struggling with a decline in textbook sales and the transition to digital learning. The US business accounts for two-thirds of Pearson’s revenues and profits.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dJ

 

Is Jupiter’s 50-year powder puff football tradition finally over?
Palm Beach (FL) Post

JUPITER – For the first time in about 50 years, there will be no powder puff girls football game at Jupiter Community High School.
“A piece of Jupiter history is going to be missing. The game has been a tradition in Jupiter,” said Ben Klug, one of the organizers who tried to keep it going.
Not enough players signing up for the tackle game between the juniors and seniors is the reason for the cancellation, Klug said. About 20 players are needed for each team and only about 14 seniors and 11 juniors signed up.
“The parents and the volunteers worked real hard to keep the event going. We had the field, concessions and other requirements in place. But without the players, we couldn’t make the game happen,” said Klug, a Jupiter resident who graduated from Dwyer High School in 1998.
The game at Velocity Community Credit Union Stadium looked like it might not happen last year after then-principal Dan Frank pulled the plug. Student safety was the deciding factor, said officials at the 2,800-student school on Military Trail.
But players and fans of were determined to see the game continue. An on-line petition to bring it back collected about 3,000 names. Boosters convinced the Jupiter town council to play the game.
Students and their parents rallied to secure insurance, equipment and the use of the high school’s field through the town’s agreement with the school district to use school property for events. The Jupiter Tequesta Athletic Association, town council, Powder puff Committee and other community members contributed.
The game was May 27 in front of about 500 fans, including several players from the inaugural game in 1966.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9dI

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

February 27:

Senate Education Committee meeting
8 a.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=SSTEDU

House Education Committee meeting
4:10 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HEDU0227.ag.htm

February 28:

House Judiciary Committee meeting
7:30 a.m., 20 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HJUD0228.ag.htm

House Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Committee meeting
7:45 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HNAE0228.ag.htm

Senate Economic Development and Workforce Services Committee meeting
8 a.m., 215 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/SEDW0228.ag.htm

Senate Government Operations and Political Subdivisions Committee meeting
8 a.m., 415 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/SGOP0228.ag.htm

Senate Education Committee meeting
4:10 p.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=SSTEDU

March 1:

House Education Committee meeting
8 a.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=HSTEDU

March 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

March 13:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

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