Education News Roundup: March 3, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Salt Lake leaders file an amicus brief in the transgender bathroom case before the Supreme Court.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hx (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9i2 (KTVX)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9i3 (KSL)

Religious leaders from around the country do the same.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hz (Religion News Service)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9hA (NBC)

Meanwhile, Utah and 10 other states drop their lawsuit against Obama administration directives on transgender bathroom use now that the Trump administration has rescinded them.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hB (WaPo)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9hC (Politico)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9hD (Reuters)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9i0 (Ed Week)

Politico looks as possible cuts to the federal education budget.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hE (Politico)

Apple is losing ground in U.S. classrooms.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hG (NYT)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

House burns midnight oil without reaching agreement on tax plan

Gov. Herbert won’t oppose hiking sales tax on food
Tax reform » Governor says the poor would need help to offset hardship from the sales surcharge.

Ogden lawmaker pushes for changes to school grade system

Utah Legislature Says Teachers’ Salaries Could Increase If State Controlled Public Lands

With Rampant Illegal School Bus Blowbys – Legislation Advances to Catch Lawbreakers

Salt Lake leaders file brief supporting transgender bathroom access
Position runs counter to brief filed by Utah and LDS Church

After Trump administration rescinds transgender student directive, states drop lawsuit challenging it

‘I sure hope we weren’t wrong’: Utah school board questions decision to not immediately shut down Vineyard charter school
Education » Franklin Discovery Academy is on probation amid accusations of impropriety.

Ogden School District Superintendent Sandy Coroles will retire June 30

Paul Widdison selected to represent Precinct 4 on Weber Board of Education

Provo fourth-graders use Utah Lake water to test filters

Cowboys spend the week in local schools before Rendezvous

Sterling Scholar hopefuls complete competition’s final round of interviews

One year later, Church’s Doctrinal Mastery initiative continues to strengthen youth

Legacy Elementary School invites community to open house

Does Bingham High School have the most school spirit in the country?

American Fork High “Cavettes” drill team status still uncertain

‘Sit back and relax, all you need is a book’: Students salute Dr. Seuss’ birthday

Inside our schools

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Charter Schools Spend More on Administration – but It Might Not Be Bad for Kids

NATION

Education Funding Outlook Bleak Under Trump’s Budget

Nearly 2000 clergy, faith leaders sign amicus brief in support of transgender protections

Apple’s Devices Lose Luster in American Classrooms

Navajo language to be taught in Grants schools
President Russell Begaye announced an agreement with the Grants-Cibola district to teach students the Navajo language

New Mexico high school students resting in ‘sleep pods’ between classes

One Big Winner Of Snap’s Even Bigger IPO: A School That Raked In Millions

Extremists Kill 2 in Burkina Faso as Schools Targeted

 

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UTAH NEWS
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House burns midnight oil without reaching agreement on tax plan

SALT LAKE CITY – House Republicans worked late into the night Thursday debating the respective merits of tax reform proposals intended to broaden the tax base and lower rates, but leaders said they reached no consensus.
Meeting in a closed-door caucus that ended shortly after 9 p.m., House members wrangled over the implications of restoring Utah’s food tax and changes to the state’s income tax system – steps House leaders say would help ensure further investment in jobs and economic expansion.
“We’re talking about things that are pretty simple, lowering the income tax rate and putting the sales tax back on food and basically holding groups of people in income brackets harmless – in fact some would be getting a tax cut – especially those on the lower income side,” said House Majority Leader Brad Wilson, R-Kaysville.
But no decisions were reached.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hw (DN)

 

Gov. Herbert won’t oppose hiking sales tax on food
Tax reform » Governor says the poor would need help to offset hardship from the sales surcharge.

Gov. Gary Herbert says he won’t stand in the way of a legislative plan to raise the sales tax on food – if steps are taken to help the poor who could be hurt the most.
If such safeguards are included, he said he “would not be opposed” to the proposal.
That comes as Republican lawmakers are trying to finalize a possible tax reform package, with only five working days remaining in this year’s Legislature. House Republicans met Thursday night in a closed-door caucus to discuss options.
Restoring the full sales tax on food is one option receiving close scrutiny. In 2006 and 2007, Utah’s tax on food was cut from 4.75 percent to 1.75 percent, a feature of tax reform pushed by then-Gov. Jon Huntsman and then-House Speaker Greg Curtis.

Republican lawmakers, who control the Legislature with supermajorities in both chambers, have said they want to enact tax reform to smooth out the volatility of the current structure. But it happens to come at a time when the group Our Schools Now is trying to get a measure on the 2018 ballot to raise the income tax rate from the current 5 percent to 5.875 percent.
The ballot initiative would generate an estimated $750 million to be infused in schools in an effort to lift Utah from last-in-the-nation in per-pupil spending.
Republican lawmakers and the governor oppose the initiative, saying that an increase in the income tax would hurt economic development efforts.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hH (SLT)

 

Ogden lawmaker pushes for changes to school grade system

After a change in grading criteria last year raised the floor for each letter grade the state assigns to Utah schools, officials from area school districts expressed frustration.
Sen. Ann Millner, R-Ogden, thinks she has a solution.
Since 2011, Utah has assigned the state’s schools a letter grade based on performance, but the metrics used for grading have changed several times. A 2016 state law raised the bar for each letter grade based on how many schools received an A or B.
“I agree we do need to put into place something that is consistent for everyone,” Millner said. “That’s the intent here.”
Millner is sponsoring Senate Bill 220, which received preliminary Legislative approval in late February, according to the Salt Lake Tribune.
“We’ve learned from experience over the last several years and tried to do this in a thoughtful way by working with the State Board (of Education) and with others to get to this point,” she said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hP (OSE)

 

Utah Legislature Says Teachers’ Salaries Could Increase If State Controlled Public Lands

Utah legislators have approved a resolution that could increase teachers’ salaries, but it’s contingent on the state taking control of half of its federal lands.
House Joint Resolution 8 states that if Utah could take control of half of its federal lands-and that is a huge “if”- then half of the net revenue from the land would be used to increase teacher salary in the state, up to 25%.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hX (KUER)

With Rampant Illegal School Bus Blowbys – Legislation Advances to Catch Lawbreakers

Legislation to help improve traffic safety near school buses was unanimously passed out of the Senate Transportation, Public Utilities, Energy, and Technology Committee Monday.
Sponsored by Representative Mike McKell (Republican – Spanish Fork), HB 235-Automated Traffic Enforcement Safety Devices authorizes the use of automated traffic enforcement safety devices on school buses to help capture photographic or video images of possible traffic law violations and participating in the program is optional. Under the legislation, 20 percent of the fines (which range from $100 to $500) collected would be given to the school district or private school that owns or contracts for the operation of the bus to help offset the cost of a camera.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hV (UPC)

 

Salt Lake leaders file brief supporting transgender bathroom access
Position runs counter to brief filed by Utah and LDS Church

SALT LAKE CITY – Salt Lake City leaders joined 31 other cities, counties and mayors Thursday in a “friend of the court” brief to the U.S. Supreme Court arguing that transgender students should be able to choose which use bathrooms they use at school.
The amicus brief runs counter to those signed in January by faith leaders, including The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and state attorneys general, including Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes.
Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski reiterated the city’s commitment to protecting LGBT rights and defending “principles of equality” in a prepared statement Thursday.
“This is no longer an issue of states’ rights, it’s an issue of equality and education,” Biskupski said. “We should be focusing on helping our kids access books and not trying to control where they go to the bathroom.”
The Salt Lake City School District currently has a gender nondiscrimination policy in place, which includes gender identity, according to the mayor’s office.
The brief was filed in the case of Gavin Grim, a 17-year-old transgender boy in Virginia, who is challenging a policy from the Gloucester County School Board ordering him to use a single-stall restroom rather than the boys’ restrooms at school. Gavin was born female but identifies as male.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hx (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9i2 (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9i3 (KSL)

 

After Trump administration rescinds transgender student directive, states drop lawsuit challenging it

The 11 states suing to stop the Obama administration’s directive expanding transgender student rights agreed to drop their lawsuit following the Trump administration’s move to rescind the order.
The states, led by Texas, sued in May, arguing that the Obama administration had overstepped its authority when it directed the nation’s public schools to allow transgender students to use bathrooms that align with their gender identity, regardless of the sex on their birth certificate. The Obama administration argued that barring students from bathrooms that match their gender identity is a violation of Title IX, the federal law that prohibits sex discrimination in schools.
Texas was joined in the lawsuit by Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, West Virginia and Wisconsin, as well as the Arizona Department of Education, Maine Gov. Paul LePage (R) and two school districts. Ten other states, led by Nebraska, also sued to challenge the directive in a separate lawsuit.
A federal judge in August issued a stay on the directive, barring it from being implemented while the case continued. The Justice Department appealed the stay, arguing that it should only apply to the 11 states challenging the directive.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hB (WaPo)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9hC (Politico)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9hD (Reuters)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9i0 (Ed Week)

 

‘I sure hope we weren’t wrong’: Utah school board questions decision to not immediately shut down Vineyard charter school
Education » Franklin Discovery Academy is on probation amid accusations of impropriety.

The Utah Board of Education had its first opportunity on Thursday to weigh in on the allegations of misconduct at Franklin Discovery Academy.
The Vineyard charter school was given probation over the weekend by the state charter school board in response to concerns over student safety, financial impropriety and teacher licensing.
But at least one school board member questioned why Franklin Discovery was given until June to address those issues, rather than being immediately shut down.
“If there are concerns for kids’ safety,” Laura Belnap said, “why continue [operating] even for one more minute?”
Dean Brockbank, a member of the state charter school board, said the charter board acted quickly to review and address the status of Franklin Discovery, holding three meetings between Thursday and Saturday last week and sending school board staff to the Vineyard campus to collect information.
After hearing the reports from staff and explanations from Franklin Discovery representatives, Brockbank said he and other charter board members were satisfied that students would not be endangered by returning to the school Monday morning.
“I sure hope we weren’t wrong,” Brockbank said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hI (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9hL (DN)

Ogden School District Superintendent Sandy Coroles will retire June 30

OGDEN – Ogden School District Superintendent Sandy Coroles announced her retirement at Thursday’s board of education meeting.
Coroles has been the district’s superintendent since 2012. She has worked in the field of education for 33 years, 28 of which have been spent at the Ogden School District.
She will retire effective June 30.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hN (OSE)

Paul Widdison selected to represent Precinct 4 on Weber Board of Education

OGDEN – Paul Widdison has been selected to serve on the Weber School District Board of Education.
Widdison, an employee at the tech company Orbital ATK, was selected from seven applicants who interviewed for the position Wednesday, March 1. The board selected him unanimously at a meeting Thursday, March 2.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hO (OSE)

Provo fourth-graders use Utah Lake water to test filters

Fourth graders at Westridge Elementary School in Provo might not be able to go to Utah Lake for their annual field trip this year. So they’re doing something to help clean it up.
The fourth-grade classes usually get a grant to go on a field trip to the lake in the spring. But when the school applied for the grant this school year, the teachers heard they might have to defer the trip because of the lake’s algae problems.
The students have a unit on water filters, and the teachers realized this would be an opportunity for the students to tackle a real problem.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hR (PDH)

 

Cowboys spend the week in local schools before Rendezvous

HYRUM – It might seem strange for a Cree, First Nations member from Canada to sing a cowboy yodeling song. Aren’t cowboys and Indians supposed to fight each other?
“We’re still fighting,” Ed Peekeekoot said, joking.
The multitalented musician, who will be performing at the seventh annual Cache Valley Cowboy Rendezvous on Friday and Saturday at Mountain Crest High School, spent Thursday playing music and telling stories for music students of all grade levels in Tyler Putnam’s music classes at the high school in Hyrum.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hS (LHJ)

 

Sterling Scholar hopefuls complete competition’s final round of interviews

LEHI – Emily Addison has big plans for her life, and she’s getting a head start.
Addison is just a junior at Summit Academy in Draper, but she expects to graduate this spring. She plans to become an FBI agent one day.
So perhaps Gigi Addison, Emily’s mother, can be forgiven for tearing up a little bit while reflecting on her daughter’s accomplishments.
“I just think back to what I did at her age. I didn’t do anything near that,” she said, her voice cracking with emotion a few minutes after her daughter interviewed with Sterling School judges at Skyridge High School in Lehi. “It’s fun to see your kids succeed. . This is the best part of being a parent, I guess.”
The younger Addison and more than 200 other Sterling Scholar hopefuls competing across 14 academic categories were at the school to put their best foot forward in a final round of judging Thursday.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hJ (DN)

 

One year later, Church’s Doctrinal Mastery initiative continues to strengthen youth

As a senior at Corner Canyon High School in Draper, Utah, Sophie Stubbs has enjoyed attending seminary for the past few years. This year Sophie, a busy student body officer and active youth, has seminary sixth period, right before lunch on her “B” day of classes.
“We have block schedule so I go every other day,” she said. “It is kind of a nice break to sing hymns and then go back to school.”
Although she has enjoyed each year in seminary, this year, she said, things have been a little different. This year she had the opportunity to learn through the Church’s Doctrinal Mastery initiative.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9i4 (DN)

 

Legacy Elementary School invites community to open house

ST. GEORGE – Students and teachers of Legacy Elementary School are ready to show off their brand new school Friday afternoon in a ribbon-cutting ceremony and community open house.
Parents and curious members of the public are invited to join Legacy Elementary faculty and city officials at 2 p.m. at the school, located at 280 E. 100 South next to the historic Dixie Sunbowl in downtown St. George.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hU (SGN)

 

Does Bingham High School have the most school spirit in the country?

Bingham High School wants the nation to know how much spirit is has.
The South Jordan high school was recently named a finalist in Varsity Brands’ 2017 America’s Most Spirited High School competition.
The winning school earns a $25,000 grand prize. People can vote online for the winner.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hM (DN)

 

American Fork High “Cavettes” drill team status still uncertain

When the word started spreading that American Fork High School might be eliminating its drill team program — known as the Cavettes — efforts immediately began to maintain the program.
One of the efforts was a petition on Change.org entitled “Save AMERICAN FORK DRILL TEAM.”
The page, which has more than 2,000 supporters as of Thursday afternoon, said: “The administrators of American Fork High School have decided to cut the American fork drill team( cavettes) they have decided to only have one dance group that will be like a dance company. The CAVETTES have been around for a long time and theyou need to stay at afhs. Please help them stay buyou signing this petition.”
According to American Fork High School, the status of the drill team is still under consideration.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9i1 (PDH)

‘Sit back and relax, all you need is a book’: Students salute Dr. Seuss’ birthday

First-grader Ryan Larson listens as Cottonwood Heights police officer Jeff Potter reads “Hop on Pop” during Dr. Seuss Day at Bella Vista Elementary School on Thursday. The school’s annual event was part of the National Education Association’s Read Across America Day, which is held each year on Dr. Seuss’ birthday. Bella Vista students celebrated with a lunch of green eggs and ham – and some reading time with invited guests, including athletes from the University of Utah as well as Cottonwood Heights police officers, firefighters and elected officials. Students were also treated to a special visit from former NFL player Kevin Curtis, who played for the St. Louis Rams and the Philadelphia Eagles. Dr. Seuss – whose real name was Theodor Geisel – would have been 113 on Thursday.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hK (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9i5 (OSE)

 

Inside our schools

North Elementary
Canyon View Middle
South Elementary
Fiddlers Elementary
Iron Springs Elementary
Three Peaks Elementary
Cedar Middle
Parowan Elementary
Enoch Elementary
Arrowhead Elementary
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hT (SGS)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Charter Schools Spend More on Administration – but It Might Not Be Bad for Kids
(New York) The 74 analysis by columnist MATT BARNUM

Ronald Reagan’s secretary of education, Bill Bennett, coined the idea of the educational Blob – a derisive term to describe, as a 1987 Education Week article put it, education “bureaucrats . devouring money that would be better spent in the classroom.”
“While many administrators and principals are doing good work, the question is: Do we really need all of them?” Bennett asked at the time.
Even news articles sometimes repeat this frame, such as a story in The New York Times that described charter schools as “a way to allow educators to try new approaches without being encumbered by the bureaucracy of traditional schools.”
So it may come as a surprise that charter schools – a favored reform of Bennett and other critics of traditional public education – generally spend significantly more on administration than district schools, according to several studies in different states.
Why do charters have such relatively high administrative costs? And is it a bad thing, a sign that charter schools have become a part of the very problem they were supposed to solve? Looking at student achievement in some places, such as New Orleans, suggests that it’s not.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hF

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Education Funding Outlook Bleak Under Trump’s Budget
Politico

House lawmakers tasked with writing a bill to fund education, labor and health programs are bracing for President Donald Trump’s budget to call for massive cuts. The lawmakers revealed Wednesday that those proposed cuts could run as high as $20 billion – a roughly 12-percent drop from the $161.6 billion that the panel tasked with funding those programs proposed in the still-unpassed bill for fiscal year 2017. “That just would be truly devastating,” said Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.), ranking member of the House appropriations subcommittee that oversees those areas. “We couldn’t sustain the needs of the programs that are under our jurisdiction.” More on the possible budget hit here.
Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.), chair of the subcommittee, said it’s still too early to know just how much the panel will have to trim, but the cuts “would affect everybody if they’re going to be that large.” Earlier this week, the Trump administration sent guidance to agencies that calls for a $54 billion increase in defense spending and corresponding reductions to most non-security agencies. But few specifics about where the White House would like cuts to be made have been released, and Cole predicted many newly confirmed agency heads will not want to “entertain cuts to the magnitude that’s possible.”
Cole’s panel is still waiting for the Budget committee to tell them how much they’ll have to work with. “We’ll live within a number and we’ll be happy with it – well maybe not happy, but we’ll live within the number,” Cole told Morning Education. “There’s no good decisions to be made if there’s a cut that bad – it’s going to be tough.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hE

 

Nearly 2000 clergy, faith leaders sign amicus brief in support of transgender protections
Religion News Service

WASHINGTON – Today more than 1,800 clergy and religious leaders signed a friend-of-the-court brief in Gloucester County School Board v. GG, the first-ever case on transgender rights to go before the Supreme Court.
The brief acknowledges the diversity of faith traditions that honor the inherent dignity and worth of transgender people and the long-standing presence of transgender people in faith communities, as both lay people and religious leaders. The brief lifts up the growing movement of religious leaders who believe transgender people should be respected, celebrated, and loved rather than feared, shunned, or discriminated against under the law. In addition, it argues against narrow interpretations of religious freedom that would privilege a single set of religious beliefs about gender.
“I have learned over my years as a transgender pastor that gender is a reflection of a deeply held inner spiritual truth,” said Rev. Erin Swenson, a transgender Presbyterian minister. “That inner truth is what theologians call the Image of God, and it should be bound by no human rule or law. Its expression brings joy and its diminishment pain.”
More than 95 national religious leaders signed the brief including the leaders of the Episcopal Church, the United Church of Christ, the Unitarian Universalist Association, the Metropolitan Community Church, the Alliance of Baptists, Muslims for Progressive Values, and Conservative, Reform, and Reconstructionist Judaism. The presidents of six seminaries and the leaders of 49 religious organizations also signed the brief.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hz

http://gousoe.uen.org/9hA (NBC)

 

Apple’s Devices Lose Luster in American Classrooms
New York Times

Apple is losing its grip on American classrooms, which technology companies have long used to hook students on their brands for life.
Over the last three years, Apple’s iPads and Mac notebooks – which accounted for about half of the mobile devices shipped to schools in the United States in 2013 – have steadily lost ground to Chromebooks, inexpensive laptops that run on Google’s Chrome operating system and are produced by Samsung, Acer and other computer makers.
Mobile devices that run on Apple’s iOS and MacOS operating systems have now reached a new low, falling to third place behind both Google­powered laptops and Microsoft Windows devices, according to a report released on Thursday by Futuresource Consulting, a research company.
Of the 12.6 million mobile devices shipped to primary and secondary schools in the United States in 2016, Chromebooks accounted for 58 percent of the market, up from 50 percent in 2015, according to the report. School shipments of iPads and Mac laptops fell to 19 percent, from about 25 percent, over the same period. Microsoft Windows laptops and tablets remained relatively stable at about 22 percent, Futuresource said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hG

 

Navajo language to be taught in Grants schools
President Russell Begaye announced an agreement with the Grants-Cibola district to teach students the Navajo language
Associated Press via Farmington [NM] Daily Times

GRANTS – The Navajo language will be offered in one more New Mexico school district under an agreement signed by the tribe and educators.
Navajo President Russell Begaye announced the agreement with the Grants-Cibola district on Wednesday. About 10 percent of the district’s 3,700 students are Navajo.
Begaye says Navajo identity and language are tied together and that the Dine language provides an expression of the tribe’s culture.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hy

 

New Mexico high school students resting in ‘sleep pods’ between classes
(Albuquerque, NM) KRQE

LAS CRUCES, N.M. – High school students in southern New Mexico are resting up between classes in “sleep pods.”
The sleep pods at Las Cruces, Chapparall and Onate High Schools allow students to lay down on a recliner chair while listening to music as a colorful lights shine inside.
Associate Professor at New Mexico State University, Linda Summers, wrote the $128,000 federal grant for the pods. Although the money comes from the federal government, Summers told KVIA-TV taxpayer dollars are being put to good use.
Summers says the pods aren’t for just taking naps. They’ve found that agitated students respond well to the pods and are able to return to class feeling better.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hY

 

One Big Winner Of Snap’s Even Bigger IPO: A School That Raked In Millions
NPR

It was in 2012 that Barry Eggers, a venture capitalist, noticed that his two high school-aged children were getting obsessed with a curious new app called Snapchat. After a little investigation, Eggers persuaded his company Lightspeed Venture Partners to become one of the first to invest hundreds of thousands of dollars in the fledgling app.
Then in a stroke of fortune, he also persuaded his children’s school, where he was the chairman of its financial growth fund, to put up a little seed money, too – $15,000, in fact.
By Thursday, when the app’s parent company Snap went public, that investment had “matured and given us a significant boost,” Simon Chiu, president of Saint Francis High School in Mountain View, Calif., wrote to parents with remarkable understatement. The school got a little more specific with Quartz Media about that “boost,” saying the school sold two-thirds of its shares in the company to raise about $24 million.
“The remaining third of its holding, roughly 700,000 shares, could be even more lucrative. Snap’s stock ended its first day of trading [Thursday] at $24.51 per share, up 44%,” Quartz reports.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hW

 

Extremists Kill 2 in Burkina Faso as Schools Targeted
Associated Press

OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso — Jihadists on motorbikes killed two people including a school official early Friday in a village in Burkina Faso’s north and then went to other villages demanding that schools close, a provincial official said.
The attack in Kourfayl terrified teachers who gathered in the nearby provincial capital for safety, said High Commissioner of Soum province Mohamed Dah.
Jihadists had warned weeks ago of attacks if schools didn’t close or teach only the Quran.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9hZ

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

March 3:

House Judiciary Committee meeting
8 a.m., 20 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HJUD0303.ag.htm

House Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Committee meeting
8 a.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HLAW0303.ag.htm

Senate Government Operations and Political Subdivisions Committee meeting
8 a.m., 415 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/SGOP0303.ag.htm

Senate Revenue and Taxation Committee meeting
8:31 a.m., 250 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/SREV0303.ag.htm

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
4 p.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00001936.htm

Senate Education Committee meeting
4:10 p.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/sedu0303.ag.htm

House Economic Development and Workforce Services Committee meeting
4:10 p.m., 20 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/hedw0303.ag.htm

House Government Operations Committee meeting
4:10 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/hgoc0303.ag.htm

Senate Business and Labor Committee meeting
4:10 p.m., 215 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/sbus0303.ag.htm

Senate Health and Human Services Committee meeting
4:10 p.m., 250 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/shhs0303.ag.htm

March 6:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
7 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

House Education Committee meeting
8 a.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=HSTEDU

Senate Education Committee meeting
2 p.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=SSTEDU

March 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

March 13:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

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