Education News Roundup: March 15, 2017

2018 Public Education Base Budget

Today’s Top Picks:

Gov. Herbert offers some kudos to Sen. Hillyard on this year’s education budget.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pD (CVD)

Park City High shows unity after hate graffiti is found near the school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pp (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9pW (PR)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9pF (KTVX)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9pH (KSL)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9pI (KSTU)

Envision Utah’s education videos are going viral.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pr (DN)

Ed Week takes a closer look at potential cuts at ED.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pP (Ed Week)

New study finds internet filters may not filter that much.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pM (Reuters)
or a copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pN (Journal of Pediatrics)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Gov. Herbert praises Hillyard’s work on education funding reform

Park City faculty, students spread messages of unity after graffiti case

Utah education videos draw a million views

Park City School District intends to put another bond on ballot
School board says taxes will be levied if measure fails

Provo City School District discusses preliminary 2018 budget

Suicide Prevention May Take a Shift in Focus
Utah Department of Health Holds Utah Safe Kids and Injury Prevention Summit

Study: High turnover rate for Utah public school teachers

Elementary teacher is Teacher of Year

National Spelling Bee contest brings cousins from across the nation closer together

Granite School District student arrested after making threat against school

Learn what a local high school is doing to help special needs students

Orem students get a taste of theater from Utah Shakespeare Festival

Students get their fill on Pi Day

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Julie Marten

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Zach Sink

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Sterling Scholars inspire Utah, remind us to expand educational opportunities

Park City School Boards bond timeline is flawed

Sterling Scholar coverage inspiring

The end of “no promo homo”: Utah could become the first Republican state to strike down anti-LGBT law
With only two dissenting votes, the GOP-dominated statehouse in Utah just reversed an anti-LGBT education law

Trump Reportedly Wants $6 Billion in Education Cuts – but History Shows He Likely Won’t Get Them
Programs reportedly targeted by Trump for cuts have backers in Congress, and edu-cuts are bad politics

Our education system won’t be fixed by dumping more devices into the classroom

NATION

New Trump Executive Order Could Lead to a Smaller Education Department

A-F grading for Mich. schools not dead issue; Legislature may weigh in

Trump Promised To Repeal Common Core. These Parents Don’t Plan To Let Him Forget It.
They voted for him in November. Now they’re pushing him to keep his promises.

America’s Top High School Science Students Are the Children of Immigrants

Charter schools’ ‘thorny’ problem: Few students go on to earn college degrees

Are school vouchers good for education? That debate is playing out in Indiana

Video Links Professors to Far-Flung Student-Teachers
Student-teachers dispersed nationwide

National Teacher of the Year Finalists Would All Say ‘Yes’ to Visit With Trump

Internet filters may fail to shield kids from disturbing content

Senate kills bill adding Idaho questions to civics test

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Gov. Herbert praises Hillyard’s work on education funding reform

After serving as the Utah legislature’s appropriations co-chairman for numerous years, Republican state senator Lyle Hillyard had a different role this year: co-chairman of appropriations for public education.
At the close of the Utah legislature’s latest session last week, the state senator from Logan received some high praise from Utah Governor Gary Herbert.
“This may be the cherry on top for a very illustrious record that he’s had in service in the legislature,” said Gov. Herbert. “This education reform that he’s involved with, in helping us find a 10 year plan going forward and funding appropriately, I think we’ll be able to do it, in large part because of the new leadership we get with Senator Lyle Hillyard.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pD (CVD)

 

Park City faculty, students spread messages of unity after graffiti case

PARK CITY – As students arrived Tuesday for class at Park City High School, the cars in the parking lot and the school’s glass windows had positive messages all over them with phrases like “PC stands for all,” “No room for hate in PC” and “Somos unidos” (“We are united.”).
“When I walked in this morning and saw all these messages on the cars, it was so amazing. I felt welcome and safe, and I know other Latino students are feeling it,” said Nayely Velasquez, the president of Latinos in Action at Park City High School.
The idea came as teachers were talking about how to respond after what they called hate speech appeared on the Aspen Villa apartments across from the school on Kearns Boulevard.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pp (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9pW (PR)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9pF (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9pH (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9pI (KSTU)

 

Utah education videos draw a million views

SALT LAKE CITY – A series of locally produced videos focused on education issues has racked up some serious viewership numbers since being released in early February.
The five videos, part of Envision Utah’s My Education, Our Future campaign have earned a cumulative million views between YouTube and social media sites. And ads for the campaign have been seen 11 million times, including over 1.7 million unique Utah viewers.
The videos highlight five principles/concepts aimed at helping students and parents of students get on the road to academic success from preschool to college.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pr (DN)

 

Park City School District intends to put another bond on ballot
School board says taxes will be levied if measure fails

The Park City Board of Education voted unanimously last week to move toward putting a large bond on the ballot this fall to address the school district’s pressing facility needs while also cautioning residents that their tax bills will still rise if the measure fails.
A bond measure, which may ask taxpayers to foot a bill of more than $100 million, would go toward an expansion of Park City High School, the construction of a new school for fifth- and sixth-graders and potentially the acquisition of land. With elementary schools bursting at the seams due to the growth of preschool and all-day kindergarten programs, many school officials have been adamant that the facilities must be built as soon as possible because they would clear out much-needed space at the elementary schools by moving fifth grade out in a grade realignment.
The need is so dire, officials say, that the projects must be completed whether residents pass a bond or not. In its vote to move forward with a bond, the board of education also specified that, should the measure fail, the district will instead impose tax levy increases, placing a much larger burden on taxpayers in the short term.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pX (PR)

 

Provo City School District discusses preliminary 2018 budget

Provo residents won’t likely see Provo City School District vote to raise their property taxes this year, according to a preliminary budget conversation Tuesday.
“I’m not going to suggest a tax increase this year,” said Stefanie Bryant, the district’s business administrator, during a budget presentation. “I don’t think it’s necessary.”
The board heard preliminary discussions on the fiscal year 2018 budget at its study session Tuesday.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pw (PDH)

 

Suicide Prevention May Take a Shift in Focus
Utah Department of Health Holds Utah Safe Kids and Injury Prevention Summit

WEST JORDAN, Utah – The numbers are staggering when it comes to the suicide rate in Utah. Violence and injury are the leading causes of death among Utah children and teens. Suicide is the leading cause of death for Utahns aged 10-17.
At the Utah Safe Kids and Injury Prevention Summit held by the Utah Department of Health says focusing on the problem can do more harm than good.
Hope and recovery is what Michael Haines promotes. He’s a nationally recognized expert in health promotion and social norms and the keynote speaker at the Utah Safe Kids and Injury Prevention Summit going on this week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pG (KTVX)

 

Study: High turnover rate for Utah public school teachers

SALT LAKE CITY – More than half of Utah’s public school teachers who started work in 2008 left the profession less than a decade later, according to a recent report by The University of Utah.
The Deseret News reported Monday that Utah’s turnover rate is high compared to the national average.
The report released in January polled about 2,700 teachers, and discovered that younger teachers had a higher turnover rate compared to their older colleagues, with 73 percent of teachers 25 years and younger departing by 2015.
Teachers ages 31-39 appeared to leave the profession at the lowest rate, with 41 percent of them departing by 2015.
It was unclear why the turnover rate in Utah has been so high.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pz (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9pC (CVD)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9pE (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9pL (MUR)

 

Elementary teacher is Teacher of Year

Jenny Atcitty, a renowned teacher from Montezuma Creek Elementary School, is the 2017 Teacher of the Year for the San Juan School District. Atcitty was presented the honor at a March 6 banquet sponsored by the San Juan School District Education Foundation.
She has taught for the past 11 years, with the majority of her time spent at Montezuma Creek and Bluff elementary schools. As the San Juan School District Teacher of the Year, she will represent the district at the Utah State Teacher of the Year competition.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pV (San Juan Record)

 

National Spelling Bee contest brings cousins from across the nation closer together

It’s a long way from Utah to New York, especially if you’re only a kid.
But a group of cousins are hoping to use their love of reading, a contest and some creative collaboration to reunite them in Washington D.C. for the National Spelling Bee.
Andrew Jarvis, from Orem; Anna Noorlander, from New York; and Eden and Brooklyn Lewis from Salt Lake City were selected as one group of 10 semi-finalists in the Spellebrity Video Contest.
The contest required they make a video that talks about how to “kindle a love of reading.” The five groups of finalists will be flown to Washington D.C. for the spelling bee, where the winner will be chosen.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9px (PDH)

 

Granite School District student arrested after making threat against school

WEST VALLEY CITY, Utah – Officers have arrested a Granite School District student Tuesday who allegedly made threats against his school, Hunter Junior High.
District officials said the student told others he was going to leave campus and later return to “do something harmful.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pJ (KSTU)

 

Learn what a local high school is doing to help special needs students

Teresa Colton, Herriman High School head cheer coach, talks about their fundraiser for Best Buddies, an amazing charity that partners special needs kids with main stream kids from junior high through college to provide social enriching activities to help build friendships.
The Best Buddies charity showcase is on Friday, March 17th from 6-8 p.m. at Herriman High School. Tickets are $10.00/person. 2 and under are free! Tickets can be purchased by contacting Synergy Gym 1-801-662-0438 or visiting their office at 6061 W 9860 S West Jordan, Utah. They can also be purchased at the door.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pK (KSTU)

 

Orem students get a taste of theater from Utah Shakespeare Festival

Students at Arches Academy in Orem were treated to a special performance Tuesday during a visit from a touring group from the award-winning Utah Shakespeare Festival.
Annette Warnick, head of school, said the private school places an added emphasis on fine arts, which made the visit from the actors extra special.
“One of the ideals we hold dear is the importance of fine arts, and those are kind of disappearing due to budget constraints at public and charter schools,” she said. “As a private school we are taking extra strides to keep it in the school and help students gain an appreciation of fine arts.”
Warnick said the visit came as part of a larger group of school visits the group has been doing, which includes a shortened performance of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9py (PDH)

 

Students get their fill on Pi Day

Utah Connections Academy’s Joziah Stewart competes in the third annual National Pi Day pie-eating contest at the Woods Cross charter school on Tuesday. Utah Connections is an online charter school that educates more 1,200 students from across the state in grades K-12. During the contest, seven students faced off against seven teachers. The event was also broadcast live to the computers of the school’s 950 students statewide. Pi – the Greek letter “π” – is the symbol used in mathematics to represent a constant – the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter – which is approximately 3.14159, hence why Pi Day is celebrated on March 14 around the world. Pi has been calculated to over 1 trillion digits beyond its decimal point. As an irrational and transcendental number, it will continue infinitely without repetition or pattern. While only a handful of digits are needed for typical calculations, Pi’s infinite nature makes it a fun challenge to memorize, and to computationally calculate more and more digits.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pq (DN)

 

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Julie Marten

Julie Martin is a kindergarten through sixth-grade special education resource teacher for Spring Creek Elementary in Provo and was selected as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Educator of the Week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pA (PDH)

 

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Zach Sink

The dance team, choir, AP classes, internships and Boy Scouts are just a few of the things that are keeping Provo High senior Zach Sink busy this year. He was selected as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Student of the Week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pB (PDH)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Sterling Scholars inspire Utah, remind us to expand educational opportunities
Deseret News editorial

Each year the Sterling Scholar Awards Program, sponsored by the Deseret News, provides recognition for exceptional academic achievement and reminds Utahns that the rising generation has immense potential. Yet, as the state continues to debate the best ways to improve K-12 education, the Sterling Scholar program should also underscore the importance of extending exceptional educational opportunities to all of Utah’s children.
The Sterling Scholar program began nearly six decades ago after staff members at the Deseret News sought ways to highlight Utah students who excel in academics since the paper’s pages often contained feats of those excelling in the state’s athletic arenas. Today, in addition to academics, the Sterling Scholar program also recognizes achievements in service and leadership.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pt

 

Park City School Boards bond timeline is flawed
Park Record letter from Curt Futch

Members of the Park City Board of Education:
I am concerned with your approach of selling the bond to the community.
You – the Board and the District – have a significant leadership issue which has resulted in a deep distrust of recommendations and decisions by the District. If you solve the leadership deficiencies, the community will support you. If you don’t, the bond will face the same fate as your last attempt. It will fail. You haven’t addressed the core issue that many of your constituents, including your own Strategy Committee, voiced directly to you as members.
Yet, you are back again asking us to fund a bond. No change. No real discussion. Yet the same request. This community strongly supports education, but we do not support keeping leadership in place that is ineffective and detrimental.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pY

Sterling Scholar coverage inspiring
Deseret News letter from Nadine N. Allen

Thank you for the beautifully presented Utah Sterling Scholars feature article I read in the paper. The format you designed and published was outstanding, easy to read, and I loved the lovely pictures of the winners with their names, their parents’ names and quotes from each student.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ps

 

The end of “no promo homo”: Utah could become the first Republican state to strike down anti-LGBT law
With only two dissenting votes, the GOP-dominated statehouse in Utah just reversed an anti-LGBT education law
Salon.com commentary by columnist NICO LANG

Utah could become the first Republican-dominated state to strike down an anti-LGBT law that prevents teachers from addressing topics related to homosexuality in schools. Last Wednesday the state’s Senate voted 24 to 1 to repeal its “no promo homo” legislation, following a similar 68-to-1 vote in the House of Representatives. Senate Bill 196, the proposal to repeal the old law, now sits on Gov. Gary Herbert’s desk. Despite his opposition to marriage equality and belief that homosexuality is a choice, Herbert is widely expected to sign the bill.
This is the second time in three years that advocates have passed legislation in support of the LGBT community in one of the country’s most conservative states. Both houses of the Utah legislature are controlled by the GOP and more than 85 percent of representatives are Mormon, a religion with a leadership that has claimed homosexuality is a “grievous sin.”
But two years ago conservatives worked with LGBT leaders on the state’s first milestone toward equality: Utah became the only legislature with a Republican majority to pass nondiscrimination protections for the LGBT community. That law, enacted in 2015, prevents people from being fired or evicted because of their gender identity or sexual orientation (although a healthy religious exemption remains for faith-based groups). The nondiscrimination effort was backed by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and represents the first time that religious group has publicly expressed support for pro-LGBT legislation.
Troy Williams of Equality Utah, the LGBT advocacy group promoting Senate Bill 196, said the successful compromise has paved the way for further cooperation on both sides of the aisle.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pU

 

Trump Reportedly Wants $6 Billion in Education Cuts – but History Shows He Likely Won’t Get Them
Programs reportedly targeted by Trump for cuts have backers in Congress, and edu-cuts are bad politics
(New York) The 74 analysis by columnist Carolyn Phenicie

Washington greets the president’s annual budget release the way it does a forecast of a few inches of snow – which is to say, often with a huge overreaction.
Much like there’s little need to rush out for bread and milk, advocates probably shouldn’t worry that the federal budget house will immediately come crashing down.
The Trump administration is days away from releasing its first budget proposal, and it reportedly will request big changes – and cuts – to the Education Department.
What’s most important to remember is that Trump’s budget is, in essence, an opening bid in an ongoing negotiation with Congress.
“Presidents’ budgets are nothing but a recommendation. They are the first step in a long process, and are often completely or mostly ignored,” said Mike Petrilli, president of the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, who worked in the Education Department under George W. Bush.
House and Senate appropriations committees will write the final bills, and in the Senate, at least some Democrats will have to vote to pass them. Cuts of the magnitude Trump will reportedly propose have been tried before – by Ronald Reagan, most notably – and never actually happened.
A brief background: the Education Department’s current budget is about $68 billion, with about $38 billion going to K-12 programs. The reported Education Department cuts are part of a proposed $54 billion in eliminations spread across the federal government to make up for an equivalent increase that Trump wants to see in defense spending.
Education Week reported Monday that the department could see a $6 billion reduction, or about 9 percent of this year’s total funding. The story says Title I grants for low-income children and special education funding through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act would be spared.
The cuts would have to come from programs like Title II teacher training grants; the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program, which funds after-school and other academic enrichment programs; the Perkins career and technical education program; and Title IV of the Every Student Succeeds Act, which funds a grab bag of other school programs, from mental health services to AP classes to technology.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9po

 

Our education system won’t be fixed by dumping more devices into the classroom
Washington Post commentary by columnist Esther J. Cepeda

CHICAGO — Former Education Secretary Arne Duncan recently issued a plea for greater student access to high-tech tools.
“The persistent lack of access to world-class educational resources and technology in far too many communities is at the heart of this issue,” Duncan wrote on the Brown Center Chalkboard, a blog of the Brookings Institution. “This inequality breeds more than just subpar test scores. It snowballs to create economic immobility, stranding people without the training necessary to earn well-paying jobs.”
Ugh.
This sort of pie-in-the-sky belief that simply getting more computers in kids’ hands and more app-development elective courses in schools will make the future bright is an oversimplification of a complex issue.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pu

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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New Trump Executive Order Could Lead to a Smaller Education Department
Education Week

President Donald Trump’s proposed budget for education could lead to significant cuts to staff and various programs, sources have told us. But it’s not the only action on the president’s agenda that could shrink the U.S. Department of Education.
On Monday, Trump released a new executive order that directs each agency leader to submit “recommendations to eliminate unnecessary agencies, components of agencies, and agency programs, and to merge functions” to Mick Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget. The recommendations, which agency head must submit to Mulvaney within 180 days, must consider the following factors, according to the text of the order:
* Whether “some or all of the functions of an agency, a component, or a program are appropriate for the federal government or would be better left to state or local governments or to the private sector through free enterprise”;
* Whether “some or all of the functions of an agency, a component, or a program are redundant, including with those of another agency, component, or program”;
* Whether “certain administrative capabilities necessary for operating an agency, a component, or a program are redundant with those of another agency, component, or program”;
* Whether the “costs of continuing to operate an agency, a component, or a program are justified by the public benefits it provides”; and
* “The costs of shutting down or merging agencies, components, or programs, including the costs of addressing the equities of affected agency staff.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pP

 

A-F grading for Mich. schools not dead issue; Legislature may weigh in
Detroit Free Press

Michigan Superintendent Brian Whiston may be backing off a plan to assign letter grades to schools, but he said today it’s not a dead issue. The Legislature ultimately may opt to move in that direction, he told State Board of Education members.
If the Legislature doesn’t adopt the A-F grading system, the Michigan Department of Education would implement a transparency “dashboard” that provides parents and the community with a host of data about how individual schools perform.
Whiston’s comments came during a board meeting in which a representative of Gov. Rick Snyder’s office expressed disappointment with news Monday that Whiston was backing off implementing the A-F system.
“The governor was quite surprised,” said Tyler Sawher, senior strategy advisor for education and career connections in the governor’s office.
Snyder, Sawher said, “continues to support A-F. We just look forward to talking about A-F and working through the details with the superintendent and the board.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pm

 

Trump Promised To Repeal Common Core. These Parents Don’t Plan To Let Him Forget It.
They voted for him in November. Now they’re pushing him to keep his promises.
Huffington Post

Donald Trump wasn’t Stacey Gyorgyi’s first choice for president ― but when she stepped into a Georgia voting booth and placed a ballot for him in November, she was hopeful.
Gyorgyi, a mother of two elementary-aged children, is deeply involved in public education activism, and after Trump repeatedly spoke on the campaign trail about his desire to dismantle the Common Core State Standards, he seemed like the best hope for creating the type of change she believed in.
Now she’s not so sure.
During the campaign and in the weeks following his election, Trump’s pledge to end the Common Core, a set of education goals that has stirred controversy on both sides of the aisle, became a popular refrain, often greeted by thunderous applause. But since taking office, the president seems to have dropped the topic, anti-Common Core activists say.
Now those same activists are working together to challenge Trump to keep his promise. Groups like the Patriots Journalist Network, a collective of conservative Twitter activists, have rallied around hashtags like #EndCommonCore and #KeepYourPromise, creating viral campaigns to get the attention of other conservatives and, they hope, of Trump himself.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pl

 

America’s Top High School Science Students Are the Children of Immigrants
Money

If the children of immigrants somehow disappeared from the U.S., America would suddenly be in a serious science talent deficit.
That’s the conclusion that can be drawn from a new report from the National Foundation for American Policy, a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to public policy research on trade, immigration, and education.
The organization found that 33 of the 40 finalists of the 2016 Intel Science Talent Search–the leading science competition for U.S. high school students, run by the Society for Science & the Public and now known as the Regeneron Science Talent Search–were the children of immigrants. Specifically, 30 out of the 40 finalists had parents who worked in America on H-1B visas, the option that is no longer available for expedited processing due to a recent policy change from the Trump administration.
“The science competition has been called the ‘Junior Nobel Prize,'” the Foundation says. “These outstanding children of immigrants would never have been in America if their parents had not been allowed into the U.S.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pn

 

Charter schools’ ‘thorny’ problem: Few students go on to earn college degrees
USA Today

Like many charter school networks, the Los Angeles-based Alliance College-Ready Public Schools boast eye-popping statistics: 95% of their low-income students graduate from high school and go on to college. Virtually all qualify to attend California state universities.
Its name notwithstanding, the network’s own statistics suggest that few Alliance alumni are actually ready for the realities – academic, social and financial – of college. The vast majority drop out. In all, more than three-fourths of Alliance alumni don’t earn a four-year college degree in the six years after they finish high school.
Publicly funded, but in most cases privately operated, charter schools like Alliance are poised to become a much bigger part of the USA’s K-12 public education system. Yet even as their popularity rises, charters face a harsh reality: Most of the schools boast promising, often jaw-dropping high school graduation rates, but much like Alliance, their college success rates, on average, leave three of four students without a degree.
Statistics for charter schools as a whole are hard to come by, but the best estimate puts charters’ college persistence rates at around 23%. To be fair, the rate overall for low-income students – the kind of students typically served by charters – is even worse: just 9%. For low-income, high-minority urban public schools, most comparable to charters, the rate is 15%.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pS

 

Are school vouchers good for education? That debate is playing out in Indiana
NewsHour

Indiana is one of nearly 30 states that offer vouchers or similar programs with the goal of allowing parents to use public funds for private schooling. When the state launched the program, it was designed for low-income students. But enrollment skyrocketed when the program was dramatically broadened by then-Gov. Mike Pence.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pT

 

Video Links Professors to Far-Flung Student-Teachers
Student-teachers dispersed nationwide
Education Week

Sarah Cole, a Harvard teacher fellow training at a charter school in Denver, was frustrated by the lack of participation in her 8th grade English/language arts class.
“It was like pulling teeth,” she said of students’ lack of responses.
Sure enough, the video she uploaded to the coaching platform for her professor and program peers to review showed students in pairs barely talking. Just a few students raised hands in the whole-group discussion.
Cole asked her training group: How can I get more students to participate? The advice flowed in from Cambridge, Mass.; New York City; and her on-site coach in Denver.
Residency training is usually a local affair, with teaching candidates placed in nearby districts and under the tutelage of an on-site teacher mentor. The program at Harvard, which is just in its first academic year, has dispatched fellows across the country-to Denver, New York, and Oakland, Calif., and soon to Dallas and Kansas City, Mo.-and it is capitalizing on video-capture technology in order to turn the distance into an instructional asset. Virtual access allows professors and mentors to give feedback as if they are on site, providing multiple perspectives to help candidates fine-tune their teaching. New York University is testing out a similar model with partner districts in Bridgeport, Conn.; Wilmington, Del.; and in the boroughs of Brooklyn and Manhattan in New York.
“We want to have a nationwide impact,” said Victor M. Pereira, the master science teacher for the Harvard Teacher Fellows program and the lead on its use of technology. “We’re pretty proud of the program design with regard to how we’re training new teachers, so we want to establish a network of districts where our fellows can make a difference across the country rather than just locally.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pO

 

National Teacher of the Year Finalists Would All Say ‘Yes’ to Visit With Trump
Education Week

Washington – Teachers have been widely skeptical and concerned about public education under President Donald Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. But the four top teachers who are in the running for the National Teacher of the Year award have a unique opportunity to have their voices heard by the new administration-and they hope to do so at the White House this spring.
The finalists for the annual top teaching award are Sydney Chaffee, a 9th grade humanities teacher in Dorchester, Mass.; Chris Gleason, a music teacher in Sun Prairie, Wis.; Athanasia Kyriakakos, an art teacher in Baltimore; and Megan Gross, a special education teacher in San Diego.
The top teachers were all here in the nation’s capital last week for a series of media interviews. They met with Education Week Teacher at the office of the Council of Chief State School Officers to discuss their love of teaching, their thoughts on the future of arts education, and their hopes of working with the new presidential administration.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pR

 

Internet filters may fail to shield kids from disturbing content
Reuters

Parents often rely on filtering software to block children’s online contact with bullies, predators, pornography and other inappropriate material, but a new study casts doubt on the effectiveness of these tools.
Researchers conducted 1,030 in-home interviews with 515 British parents and their adolescent children. Overall, children with filtering software on their home computers were less likely to report negative online experiences, the analysis found.
But the difference was so small that researchers dismissed it as random. They report in the Journal of Pediatrics March 14 that 17 percent of youngsters with filters and 22 percent of those without reported negative online experiences.
“Internet filtering, on its own, does not appear effective for shielding adolescents from things that they find aversive online,” lead author Andrew Przybylski said in an email. A psychologist, Przybylski is a senior research fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford in England.
“Parents may feel reassured in knowing they have internet filters in their home, but our results suggest that such filters do not safeguard against young people seeing things that may frighten or upset them,” he said.
“As young people grow into adults, there has to be a degree of risk tolerance as they build their own resilience. Keeping open lines of communication is key,” he said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pM

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pN (Journal of Pediatrics)

 

Senate kills bill adding Idaho questions to civics test
AP via (Boise) Idaho Statesman

BOISE, IDAHO – An Idaho Senate panel has spiked a proposal suggesting that high school students should have to pass a civics test that included at least 25 questions on the history of Idaho.
Members on the Senate Education Committee said Tuesday they liked the overall concept of the bill, but couldn’t sign off on the current legislation being presented.
Republican Rep. Bryan Zollinger, the bill’s sponsor, countered that the test would encourage students to learn more about their state government.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9pQ

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

March 24:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

May 4:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

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