Education News Roundup: March 30, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Gov. Gary R. Herbert at Oquirrh Hills Middle School./Photo Courtesy Utah Governor’s Office

Gov. Herbert finishes up action on remaining bills, including some education bills he signed at Oquirrh Hills Middle School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xD (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9xG (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9y3 (KTVX)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9y6 (DN via KSL)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9y8 (KSTU)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9yc (KUER)

D-News looks at a program to get more foster care kids into college.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xT (DN)

American Preparatory Academy must halt construction on its new school until the state fire marshal can sign off on an emergency access route.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yp (SLT)

Secretary DeVos stresses school choice in her first major policy address at the Brookings Institution.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xI (NYT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9xJ (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9yi (Chalkbeat)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9xL (USN&WR)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9xK (AP)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Herbert completes 2017 bill signings during visit to Riverton middle school
Laws > Education measures related to bullying prevention, teacher evaluations, budget and more.

New laws address range of issues

This group of youths almost never go to college, but Utah has a plan to change that

American Preparatory Academy ordered to halt construction of Draper high school campus

For Utah music director and educator extraordinaire Kelly DeHaan, ‘Bingo’ just one of his games

Office of the State Auditor Releases A Performance Audit Of State Agency And Board Of Education Compliance With Performance Evaluation Requirements
State Entity Compliance With Performance Evaluation Rules Varies Widely

Logan students can sleep in next year – a little

Emery students compete in Sterling Scholars

Mountainside sixth graders host community Renaissance Fair

American Fork’s Shelley Elementary celebrates turning 50

Goodbye, North Elementary: demolition set for May

Canyon Community Center hosts All-State Utah High School Art Exhibition

SCHS student electrocuted after shop class accident

Police: teen posted naked photo of classmate to Snapchat
Victim didn’t know he’d been photographed

Schools launch crisis intervention line

Herriman High School students reminded of dangers of driving ‘intexticated’

Weather school at North Summit Elementary

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Utah schools should offer real sex education

Why I’m Worried About the Future of Charter Schools
Hurdles are ahead for charters in the age of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos

How the SAT and PSAT collect personal data on students — and what the College Board Does with it

Invest in education instead of incarceration
After serving time in Rikers Island as a teen, and again as an adult, I changed. Others can, too.

Good Schools, Affordable Homes: Finding Suburban Sweet Spots
Schools are one of the most important reasons families leave cities. But not all suburban districts are alike.

NATION

Betsy DeVos Calls for More School Choice, Saying Money Isn’t the Answer

Trump’s Education Department nixes Obama-era grant program for school diversity

A Surprising Explanation For Why Some Immigrants Excel In Science

Engineering Making Headway in Schools, Analysis Shows

Muslim Schoolchildren Bullied By Fellow Students And Teachers

Dept. of Education Asked to Remove Islam Materials From Public Schools

AG: Lakewood rabbi stole more than $630,000 from special-needs education fund

Alabama principal stops student from taking grandmother to prom

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Herbert completes 2017 bill signings during visit to Riverton middle school
Laws > Education measures related to bullying prevention, teacher evaluations, budget and more.

Riverton * Before adding his signature to the final bills of the 2017 legislative session Wednesday, Utah Gov. Gary Herbert donned a pair of rainbow-colored safety goggles and took a robot for a spin.
Touring Oquirrh Hills Middle School, Herbert visited members of the school’s Velocity Raptors robotics team, who handed the controls for their competition machine over to the governor for an attempt at scooping up a blue exercise ball.
Herbert was able to line the robot up with its target. But a faulty motor stopped the robot’s arms from lifting up the ball – which in turn would have triggered the intro to “Circle of Life” from The Lion King.
“I did my part,” Herbert said, before turning the robot and rushing it at a newspaper photographer crouching nearby. “Here’s what I think of the press.”
Herbert saved a package of education bills for his last day to sign or veto new legislation. Flanked by lawmakers, educators and Oquirrh Hills Middle School students, the governor ratified new laws related to bullying prevention and teacher evaluations, as well as a new public education budget that adds roughly $240 million to school spending.
Within that funding is $68 million to address enrollment growth, and about $120 million – a 4 percent increase – in per-student spending that can be used at the discretion of local administrators on salaries, classroom technology or other priorities.
Herbert’s office also released a final list of bill actions Wednesday, including several pieces of legislation that will be enacted into law without the governor’s signature, an indication that he didn’t favor these ideas.
Among those bills is HB136, a largely symbolic law that encourages the Utah Board of Education to request state dollars to compensate for funding that could be lost by ignoring federal education programs. Herbert said his decision to neither sign nor veto HB136 and six other bills was due to their being unnecessary and redundant.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xD (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9xG (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9y3 (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9y6 (DN via KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9y8 (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9yc (KUER)

New laws address range of issues

The 2017 Utah legislative session ended March 9, and a variety of bills – from codifying short-term rental advertising to removing safety inspections for most vehicles – are now becoming law with Gov. Gary Herbert’s signature. Many of those laws will have direct impacts to residents throughout the state, including those who live in southeastern Utah. Municipal and county governments, as well as businesses, also will be affected by some new legislation.
Here’s a look at a few of the 535 bills passed by the Utah Legislature this year:

Health education amendments
Utah lawmakers removed language that expressly prohibited the “advocacy of homosexuality” in health instruction in public schools. Lawmakers were threatened with a lawsuit from Equality Utah, which challenged state laws preventing positive portrayals of gay, lesbian and bisexual people in curricula.
“We will be working now with the State Board of Education to insure that LGBTQ students in every school district are treated fairly,” said Troy Williams, executive director of Equality Utah. “We hope that the passage of [the bill] sends a message to LGBTQ students that they are valued and loved.”
Although the bill removed language regarding homosexuality, the legislation re-affirmed the state’s stance on abstinence-only curricula.
“It’s a balance for sustaining our current statute, which focuses on fidelity and abstinence and makes sure that it conforms to the current laws and updates to the statute,” said the bill’s co-sponsor, Sen. Stuart Adams.
Equality Utah considers the bill a victory, but Williams said that its reaffirmation of abstinence-only policies – including the prohibition of “advocacy or encouragement of contraceptive methods or devices” – reveal that their work is not over.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yq (Moab Times Independent)

 

This group of youths almost never go to college, but Utah has a plan to change that

SALT LAKE CITY – States remove abused and neglected children from dangerous or troubling situations every day and place them in foster care, promising to keep them safe. That doesn’t mean the children are promised an especially bright future.
Statistics are disheartening, despite the good intentions and best efforts of policymakers, caseworkers and others. Foster kids move from home to home and change schools on average six times while in care, so most are perpetually behind in school by at least one grade level. They are more likely to drop out or be expelled than students in general.
National data show fewer than half of foster youths even graduate from high school, compared to 82 percent of students overall. While slightly more than half of high school students nationally go to college and 30 percent earn a degree, fewer than 3 percent of foster youths ever enroll in higher education and an abysmal one-third of 1 percent – 0.03 percent – graduate. Utah does a little better than average with high school graduation rates, but mirrors national college statistics, said Crystal Vail, Youth Services Program administrator for the state.
Those numbers could soon change. Utah is joining several states that partner with a local university – in this case, the University of Utah – to get older foster kids ready for college and their futures. In late April, Utah foster kids who have just completed eighth and ninth grade and who live within 40 miles of the U. will be invited to learn about and apply for a spot in the First Star Academy, a program that’s turning college attendance and graduation numbers upside down across the country for foster youths who take part. Participants can choose where to get their college education when the time comes; the point is to get them to picture themselves at a university and know they belong there.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xT (DN)

 

American Preparatory Academy ordered to halt construction of Draper high school campus

A Draper charter school’s attempt to open a new high school this fall was hit with a one-two punch this week.
Third District Judge Su Chon ruled Tuesday that American Preparatory Academy’s property falls short of a nearby roadway. On Thursday, the school was ordered to halt construction on its new high school campus until the state fire marshal can sign off on an emergency access route that reaches the site through a nearby residential neighborhood.
“They were sent a stop-work order this morning by the Board of Education that basically tells them the only thing they have the authority to work on is the road,” said Natalie Grange, an assistant state superintendent.
Grange said American Preparatory Academy had received a temporary construction permit, which allowed “limited construction” on the high school site while emergency access issues were resolved. The fire marshal was unable to inspect the access road before the permit expired Tuesday, Grange said, which prompted the state school board to grant an extension of the temporary permit until April 7.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yp (SLT)

 

For Utah music director and educator extraordinaire Kelly DeHaan, ‘Bingo’ just one of his games

Most people have 24 hours in a day. Kelly DeHaan might be one of the exceptions.
“I think Kelly has more hours in his day than the rest of us,” said Sally Dietlein, vice president and executive producer at West Valley City-based Hale Centre Theatre, where DeHaan is one of the music directors (and, sometimes, an actor). The Hale gig is in addition to his day job at West Jordan High School, the occasional special project for the LDS Church, and his leadership of Utah Voices. The latter group, a community choir based in Davis County, presents its most popular show of the year on Friday – Broadway Bingo.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xR (SLT)

Office of the State Auditor Releases A Performance Audit Of State Agency And Board Of Education Compliance With Performance Evaluation Requirements
State Entity Compliance With Performance Evaluation Rules Varies Widely

Salt Lake City, UTAH – The Office of the State Auditor (Office) today released A Performance Audit Of State Agency And Board Of Education Compliance With Performance Evaluation Requirements.
The Utah State Personnel Management Act separates civil service positions within the state into two schedules: A and B. Schedule B is the competitive career service schedule which includes “all positions filled through competitive selection procedures”. The Department of Human Resource Management (DHRM) is statutorily tasked with establishing a career service system designed to effectively implement employee retention of high quality employees. Additionally, DHRM rules require that all career service employees receive a performance evaluation each fiscal year. State entities subject to DHRM rules are required to use the Utah Performance Management System (UPM) for career service employee performance plans and evaluations. DHRM is also required to maintain an electronic record of each employee’s information, which includes their performance ratings.
The report identified two key findings:
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xE (State Auditor)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xF (State Auditor)

 

Logan students can sleep in next year – a little

LOGAN – A change in class schedules at Logan High School has pushed the entire small city district to later school start times next year.
“Ultimately the goal is to create a school day and school structure that gives kids the best chance for success,” said Logan City School District Superintendent Frank Schofield. He said the community, teachers and students stand to benefit from the changes.
In August, Logan High School will not only move from a seven-period-per-day schedule to an A/B schedule with four classes each day, but it will also start 30 minutes later, at 8 a.m. Mount Logan Middle School will start at 8:45 a.m., 15 minutes later than it has been and the district’s six elementary schools will also make some changes following a Tuesday vote by the Logan City School District Board of Education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xH (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9xV (AP via OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9y1 (AP via KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9yb (KUER)

 

Emery students compete in Sterling Scholars

San Juan High was the host school for this year’s Sterling Scholar program. The program was held at USU Eastern in Price. Mike Bowers was the master of ceremonies for the evening. Chancellor Joe Peterson from USU Eastern welcomed everyone to the campus. He said it was a great honor to have the Sterling Scholars on campus. The IQ on campus went up as well as the number of people wearing ties that day. He said all the students have exhibited a love for learning. He congratulated them on the drive and interest and enthusiasm.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yr (Emery County Progress)

 

Mountainside sixth graders host community Renaissance Fair

“Hear Ye, Hear Ye! Welcome to the Renaissance Fair!”
Mountainside Elementary in Mendon held a first-of-its-kind celebration on March 24, transforming the school’s gymnasium into an extraordinary Renaissance Fair, complete with vendor booths, entertainment and hands-on demonstrations.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xX (CVD)

 

American Fork’s Shelley Elementary celebrates turning 50

Shelley Elementarymay not be the oldest school in Alpine School District, but it’s certainly getting up there.
Shelley Elementary staff and students celebrated the school’s 50th anniversary March 23 with an open house and a whole lot of service.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xW (PDH)

 

Goodbye, North Elementary: demolition set for May

After more than 60 years, the old North Elementary School building will be demolished over the course of two weeks this May.
But school officials are giving former students and teachers the opportunity to come walk through the halls of the old elementary school one last time before it is demolished.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xZ (SGS)

 

Canyon Community Center hosts All-State Utah High School Art Exhibition

The All-State Utah High School Art Exhibition will show throughout April at the Canyon Community Center as part of the Utah Arts & Museums’ Traveling Exhibition Program. The exhibit features award-winning artwork by students participating in the All-State High School Show.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yn (Southern Utah Independent)

 

SCHS student electrocuted after shop class accident

A Snow Canyon High School student was brought to the ground due to electrical shocks he suffered while working in shop class Tuesday.
At around 1 p.m., an SCHS student found a peer lying on the ground – not breathing and unresponsive – while he was actively being shocked by electrical equipment. According to St. George Police Officer Lona Trombley, the 17-year-old student was burning designs into wood using electricity, which was something he had done many times before.
“This time, he forgot to hook up to a surge protector, and, somehow, the equipment he was using was attached to jumper cables,” Trombley said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xY (SGS)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9y0 (KUTV)

 

Police: teen posted naked photo of classmate to Snapchat
Victim didn’t know he’d been photographed

AMERICAN FORK, Utah – An American Fork teen could be facing serious charges after police say he took a naked photo of his classmate and posted it to Snapchat.
Police say the 13-year-old teen took a photo of his 14-year-old classmate in the locker room of American Fork Junior High School. The 14-year-old was showering at the time and didn’t know he was being photographed, according to court documents.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9y2 (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9y7 (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9yd (MUR)

 

Schools launch crisis intervention line

Being a teenager isn’t always easy.
One in five kids between the ages of 13 and 18 live with some sort of mental health condition, and suicide is the third leading cause of death for individuals between the ages of 10 and 24. Sometimes, kids who are struggling don’t know where to turn. Officials at the Grand County School District hope to make finding help easier through the SafeUT app.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yo (Moab Sun News)

 

Herriman High School students reminded of dangers of driving ‘intexticated’

Sadie Villagomez steers a driving wheel while wearing a virtual reality headset that gives the senior a personal look at the consequences of distracted driving at Herriman High School on Wednesday. Students at the school are getting some stark reminders about the dangers and possible consequences of distractions in the car during Distracted Driving Awareness Week. As part of the campaign, Unified police partnered with Herriman High to bring a car that was crushed in a distracted driving accident to the school, where it is on display in front of the building all week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xU (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9y4 (KTVX)

 

Weather school at North Summit Elementary

Good4Utah’s Devon Lucie was live at Weather school at North Summit Elementary in Coalville.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9y5 (KTVX)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Utah schools should offer real sex education
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Alison Witt

Sex education in schools has been up for debate for many years. As a 20 year-old who experienced the sex education program in Utah, I would like to see Utah shift to a comprehensive sex education program.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xS

 

Why I’m Worried About the Future of Charter Schools
Hurdles are ahead for charters in the age of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos
Education Week op-ed by Greg Richmond, president and CEO of the National Association of Charter School Authorizers

Over the last few weeks, I’ve been asked repeatedly about U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. Friends and neighbors who know that my work involves charter schools have said, “You must be happy.” But the truth is, I am worried about the future of charter schools.
I have little doubt that there will be more schools with the word “charter” in their names in the years ahead. Yet I have serious concerns about whether these schools will be faithful to the principles upon which the charter school philosophy is built: providing parents with the ability to choose a good school for their child, giving educators more freedom to innovate, and holding schools accountable for student learning. When all three of these principles-choice, autonomy, and accountability-are practiced in concert, we have seen that charter schools can change lives.
Over the years, these principles have created odd bedfellows. In state legislatures, the loudest champions of charter schools are often political conservatives who are attracted to the concepts of choice, competition, and deregulation. But in many communities, the charter school movement is led by liberal social-justice advocates who see an opportunity to help millions of low-income black and brown students get a quality education that the traditional system has failed to provide for generations.
For the last 25 years, in what may be the last outpost of bipartisanship in our country, these odd bedfellows worked together to create the nearly 7,000 charter schools that are serving more than 3 million children, according to estimates from the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. But now that coalition is splintering.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yg

 

How the SAT and PSAT collect personal data on students — and what the College Board Does with it
Washington Post commentary by columnist Valerie Strauss

If your child takes the SAT or PSAT, is his or her personal information being collected, profiled, licensed and sold?
That is the question that Cheri Kiesecker, Colorado parent and member of the Parent Coalition for Student Privacy, asks and attempts to answer in the following important post. The Parent Coalition for Student Privacy is a national alliance of parents and advocates defending the rights of parents and students to protect their data.
The SAT has traditionally been used as a college entrance exam but it, and the ACT, also a college entrance exam, are increasingly being used as high school tests. In fact, 25 states now require that high school students take them for school accountability and other purposes, Education Week reported here.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ye

 

Invest in education instead of incarceration
After serving time in Rikers Island as a teen, and again as an adult, I changed. Others can, too.
USA Today op-ed by Johnny Perez, a safe re-entry advocate at the Urban Justice Center

I was 16 years old when I first went into solitary confinement in New York’s notorious Rikers Island prison. I was held in that isolated cell, which was no larger than a small New York City apartment bathroom, for 60 days after getting into a fight with another inmate.
When I entered solitary, I immediately wondered whether I would survive.
For as long as I could remember, teachers had told me that we lived in a country governed by the values of fairness and the right to be free from cruel and unusual punishment. But in 1996, I was in one of two states that tried children as adults. I was arrested for gun possession and sentenced to a year.
I grew up in a tough area of New York City where no one ever called or trusted cops. Some officers entered the community anyway, and a teenager getting beat up by an officer was not unusual. If a dispute was to be resolved, we did it ourselves. I carried a gun for my own protection. But that gun landed me in a unit known as the “butcher shop” – one of the most dangerous areas of Rikers Island.
I wonder what my life would have looked like had the criminal justice system seen the potential in me when I was 16 and invested in my future instead of exacting a punishment that I am still paying for more than 20 years later.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yf

 

Good Schools, Affordable Homes: Finding Suburban Sweet Spots
Schools are one of the most important reasons families leave cities. But not all suburban districts are alike.
New York Times commentary by QUOCTRUNG BUI and CONOR DOUGHERTY

For better or worse, it’s common for city-dwelling families that reach a certain size to make the leap to the suburbs for more space and better schools.
But even among comparable suburban neighborhoods, seemingly arbitrary school district boundaries can lead to huge differences in price. There are many factors in a home price, of course, but economists have estimated that within suburban neighborhoods, a 5 percent improvement in test scores can raise prices by 2.5 percent. And for many cities, this is largely the pattern — prices rise with school quality. But there are some districts that break this pattern: schools that deliver on quality with homes that are relatively cheap.
Using home price data from Redfin, a national real estate brokerage, and school quality data based on test scores from the Stanford Education Data Archive, we developed a set of charts that look at school quality, home price and commute. For instance, in the Boston area (where many suburban school districts are considered first rate), more expensive school districts like Brookline, Mass., tend to have strong scores and relatively short commutes. Equally good districts, like Lexington, may be cheaper, but people living there face longer commutes.
But in some areas – particularly a handful of dense cities with good public transit – the preference for being in the city center seems to outweigh the importance of school quality by a huge margin.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yk

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Betsy DeVos Calls for More School Choice, Saying Money Isn’t the Answer
New York Times

WASHINGTON – Betsy DeVos, in her first extended policy address as education secretary, argued on Wednesday for an expansion of school choice programs, pointing to lagging test scores and a program championed by the Obama administration that funneled billions into lowperforming schools but failed to produce better academic outcomes.
Speaking at the Brookings Institution, which released a ranking of choice options in the country’s 100 largest school districts, Ms. DeVos made her case for choice policies that she said focused on the “individual child.” And she called for the rejection of an “us versus them mentality” when it comes to investing in programs, like charter schools and school vouchers, to which President Trump has proposed giving part of a $1.4 billion funding increase in the fiscal year that begins in October.
“Our nation’s commitment is to provide a quality education to every child to serve the greater public, common good,” Ms. DeVos said in her address. “Accordingly, we must shift the paradigm to think about education funding as investments made in individual children, not in institutions or buildings.”
While Ms. DeVos offered no new details about the Education Department’s budget – which in the president’s budget blueprint takes a $9 billion, or 13.5 percent, cut – she rejected the notion that money was a panacea for the challenges
facing public schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xI

http://gousoe.uen.org/9xJ (Ed Week)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9yi (Chalkbeat)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9xL (USN&WR)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9xK (AP)

 

Trump’s Education Department nixes Obama-era grant program for school diversity
Washington Post

President Trump’s Education Department has decided to nix an Obama-era grant program meant to help local districts devise ways to boost socioeconomic diversity within their schools, a program that some advocates considered a barometer of the new administration’s commitment to integrated classrooms.
An Education Department official said the $12 million grant program was discontinued because it would not be a wise use of tax dollars, in part because the money was to be used for planning, not implementation. The decision says nothing about the administration’s interest in diversity, said the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity.
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, speaking at the Brookings Institution Wednesday, said she believes socioeconomic and racial diversity is “a real benefit in schools.” But advocates say her words don’t match her actions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xQ

 

A Surprising Explanation For Why Some Immigrants Excel In Science
NPR

Seventeen-year-old Indrani Das just won the top high school science prize in the country. Das, who lives in Oradell, N.J., took home $250,000 from the former Intel Science Talent Search, now the Regeneron Science Talent Search, for her study of brain injuries and neuron damage. In her spare time, she’s already working with patients as a certified EMT.
As the Times of India pointed out, Das was one of five Indian Americans among the competition’s top ten finishers. In last year’s contest, according to one study, more than 80 percent of finalists were the children of immigrants.
What is it that spurs so many recent arrivals to the United States to excel in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM disciplines? Some invoke cultural stereotypes, like that of the “Tiger Mother,” for an explanation.
Not Marcos Rangel. For a new study published in the journal Demography, Rangel, an economist at Duke University, and his co-author, Marigee Bacolod of the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, looked at U.S. Census data for young adults who arrived in the United States before age 18. The data covers in detail the relative skills required for different occupations, such as physical strength, communication skills, social skills, math and reasoning. For those who went to college, they were also able to see what major they chose.
What’s unique about this study is that Bacolod and Rangel subdivided the immigrants in two ways. First, whether they arrived in early childhood, before age 10. Second, whether their native language was linguistically close to English – say, German – or less similar – say, Vietnamese. Most linguists agree that these two factors have a dramatic impact on someone’s chances of becoming perfectly fluent in a second language.
Immigrants in general, he found, were markedly more likely to choose jobs that require physical strength. This may reflect barriers to accessing higher education. However, they were also relatively more likely to choose jobs that require math and logic or social and emotional skills rather than relying on communication skills. And among the subset of immigrants who attended college, the ones who arrived later and from more linguistically distinct places – think the Vietnamese teen, not the German toddler – were many times more likely to major in a STEM field.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9y9

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ya (Demography) $

 

Engineering Making Headway in Schools, Analysis Shows
Education Week

Engineering is getting more attention in classrooms, especially in those states that have adopted the Next Generation Science Standards, according to an analysis of national test data.
The NGSS, which were finalized in April 2013, emphasize engineering and design in ways that many previous state standards did not.
Change the Equation, a nonprofit group that mobilizes the business community to improve STEM learning, looked at data from surveys administered to 4th and 8th grade teachers and students as part of the 2015 National Assessment of Educational Progress.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yh

 

Muslim Schoolchildren Bullied By Fellow Students And Teachers
NPR

Muslim children are more likely to be bullied in school than children of other faiths. A new survey by the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding (ISPU) reveals that 42 percent of Muslims with children in K-12 schools report bullying of their children because of their faith, compared with 23 percent of Jewish and 20 percent of Protestant parents.
These results confirm recent findings by other research and advocacy groups showing that bullying of students of color is on the rise.
After hearing stories from educators nationwide about the recent surge in bullying, Maureen Costello, director of the Teaching Tolerance program at the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), decided to investigate. During the election, Costello sent a questionnaire to thousands of educators across the country. The results were startling. Over 90 percent of educators reported that school climate had been negatively affected by the election. In an earlier survey last March, with over 5,000 respondents, more than 1,000 mentioned Donald Trump – five times more than the other politicians mentioned in the survey combined.
“The elephant in the room was that Mr. Trump’s campaign had an effect. We could not avoid the fact that children were imitating him both in word, tone and behavior, said Costello.
According to the SPLC’s study, “The Trump Effect” arises from comments the President has made about immigrants and minorities, which have emboldened politicized bullying in schools. Muslim children, in particular, have been primary targets for hate incidents. While the SPLC’s results are not scientific, the organization says a “tremendous number of responses as well as the overwhelming confirmation of what has been anecdotally reported in the media cannot be ignored or dismissed.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xO

A copy of the poll
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xP (Institute for Social Policy and Understanding)

 

Dept. of Education Asked to Remove Islam Materials From Public Schools
Fox Tucker Carlson Tonight

The president of the Christian Action Network said his group found that the Department of Education is funding thorough lesson plans on the Islamic faith.
Martin Mawyer said that, through PBS, the DOE is disseminating materials that allow teachers to quiz students on what Muslim prayers sound like and what prayer movements look like.
The plans also are said to help teach students how a Muslim would use passages from the Quaran and Hadith in everyday life.
“How can a teacher grade a student on these types of questions?” he asked.
Mawyer said he was “shocked” at the findings and said there would likely be outrage if a similar lesson plan existed for Christianity or another major world religion.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yj

 

AG: Lakewood rabbi stole more than $630,000 from special-needs education fund
Asbury Park (NJ) Press

LAKEWOOD – The founder of a special-needs school, which takes in tens of millions of tax dollars a year from the struggling public schools here, was indicted Wednesday on charges he stole more than $630,000 in public funds and then used the school’s fundraising foundation to launder much of the money, the state attorney general said.
Rabbi Osher Eisemann, 60, of Lakewood, who is the founder and director of the School for Children with Hidden Intelligence, better known as SCHI (pronounced “shy”), was charged by a state grand jury with: Theft by unlawful taking; misapplication of government property; misconduct by a corporate official; and money laundering – all second-degree offenses that carry up to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $150,000, state Attorney General Christopher Porrino said in a statement.
The school’s fundraising foundation, the non-profit Services for Hidden Intelligence, LLC, was also named in the indictment under the same charges. The school itself was not charged in the indictment.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9xM

http://gousoe.uen.org/9xN (WSJ)

 

Alabama principal stops student from taking grandmother to prom

When Eufaula High School senior Bryce Maine decided to ask his grandmother to prom, he thought it would be a sweet gesture and a chance for his ‘nanny’ to have a new experience.
Eufaula High School Principal Steve Hawkins, however, felt otherwise. While many in the community supported Maine’s idea to take his grandmother to prom, Hawkins denied Catherine Maine permission to attend the event on April 8.
The decision has since sparked controversy as many were left wondering why Maine and his grandmother were not allowed to attend the prom. Sarah Catherine, Maine’s Cousin, shared her anger on Facebook in a post that has now been shared nearly 2,000 times and inspired the #letnannygotoprom hashtag.
“My blood is boiling right now,” Catherine said in the post. “My little cousin Bryce wanted to take our Grandma to his senior Prom since she has never been. Well after she done bought her dress and made plans, the principal decided that they cannot do that anymore… Like really?! Eufaula High School let my Grandma go to Prom!”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yl (Montgomery [AL] Advertiser)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9ym (Fox)

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

April 3:

Audit Subcommittee of the Legislative Management Committee meeting
3 p.m., 250 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002093.htm

April 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
2750 University Park Blvd., Layton
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

April 21:

Utah State Board of Education Law and Licensing Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

Utah State Board of Education Finance Committee meeting
1 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

April 26:

Utah State Board of Education Standards and Assessment Committee meeting
9:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 4:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

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