Education News Roundup: March 31, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

American Preparatory Academy halts construction on its new school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yQ (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9yY (KTVX)

Tuacahn moves to a block schedule and separates out music, dance and theatre.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yW (SGS)

Fremont High principal visits elementary schools to get students excited to come to high school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yS (OSE)

U.S. Department of Education says state accountability plans ought to encourage school choice.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yK (USN&WR)

Recess fans may find some helpful tips in new publications from the CDC and SHAPE America.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9z7 (Ed Week)
or copies of the studies
http://gousoe.uen.org/9z8 (SHAPE America)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9z9 (SHAPE America)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

American Preparatory Academy halts Draper school construction hours after order to do so
Draper residents irked by traffic spilling over into neighborhood.

Tuacahn High School overhauls its grade scale, programs

Fremont High principal encourages school spirit, success from early age

Fashion project changes perception of clothing for InTech students

Utah’s dual language immersion programs

Writing conference invites national bestselling authors, helps teen publish her own novel

Logan students can sleep in next year – a little

Kofi Herrick, Adopted from Ghana Orphanage, is Goal-scoring Threat for Fremont

Best Buddies supports students with special needs

LaVerkin students raise thousands for village school

Layton group giving dads tools they need to do their daughters’ hair

OPINION & COMMENTARY

More changes needed at valley schools

Betsy DeVos’ American Carnage
Echoing her boss, she sees horrendous decline in America’s schools-but even the numbers she cites undermine her point.

Schooled by Politics
The mistakes that sank Republicans on health care plague education reform, too.

NATION

DeVos to Use State Accountability Plans to ‘Encourage’ School Choice
The Education Department is clarifying recent comments from Betsy DeVos, who said accountability plans could be a mechanism for pushing states to provide educational options for parents and children.

Betsy DeVos slams Denver schools for offering “accessibility without choices”
A new Brookings report gives Denver Schools the top score for school choice

Arizona taxpayer-funded vouchers benefiting students in more-affluent areas

Why high court’s ruling on special education meant so much to parents
Beyond the legal implications, the Supreme Court’s unanimous decision is evidence of the shift in the way America thinks about people with disabilities, special needs advocates say.

Appeals Court Rejects Race-Bias Challenge to Drug Testing at a Catholic High School

Climate Change Skeptic Group Seeks to Influence 200,000 Teachers

Here’s The Real Way To Fix The Teen Sleep Loss Epidemic
It’s not later school start times, but here’s what might actually work, according to a new study.

Study: A Teacher’s Encouragement Gives Students a Lasting Boost

Hedge Fund Pioneer’s Investing Advice for Kids: Learn Coding
New York benefit previews kids’ program language Scratch 3.0

The Psychological Approach to Educating Kids
Increased focus on kids’ psychological health may seem like the education world’s flavor of the day, but it’s achieving results.

CDC, SHAPE America Provide Schools Strategies for Successful Recess

 

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UTAH NEWS
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American Preparatory Academy halts Draper school construction hours after order to do so
Draper residents irked by traffic spilling over into neighborhood.

Draper . Construction continued Thursday on a new American Preparatory Academy high school, in likely violation of permits issued by the Utah Board of Education.
A temporary permit had been extended through April 7, Assistant State Superintendent Natalie Grange said, allowing minimal site work until the state fire marshal can sign off on an emergency access route that reaches the property through a nearby residential neighborhood.
“They were sent a stop-work order this morning by the Board of Education that basically tells them the only thing they have the authority to work on is the road,” Grange said. “They’re not supposed to be working on the building.”
Despite the order to halt construction Thursday morning, crews remained active at the site into the early afternoon.
In a statement sent to The Salt Lake Tribune at 5 p.m., American Preparatory Academy (APA) Chairman Brad Findlay said work was shut down at the site after the school board’s order was verified.
“This is simply a misunderstanding, a communication glitch,” Findlay said. “We will work to resolve it and are confident we will be back to work quickly and open on time this fall with our new high school.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yQ (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9yY (KTVX)

 

Tuacahn High School overhauls its grade scale, programs

Administrators at Tuacahn High School have announced some big changes for its Titans.
Beginning the fall 2017 semester, the performing arts charter school will no longer offer its music, dance and theater academy. The grading system witnessed an overhaul, and the students will also now be working with a new block schedule that runs until 4 p.m. each day.
Principal Drew Williams said some were concerned with the school taking away the musical theater opportunities as well as the school-time extension to 4 p.m., but he said the changes were made with research in mind, particularly from New York University.
“The MDT programs are becoming less and less because they produce a lot more cast members than they do leading roles,” Williams said, adding that the academy focused a lot on ensemble.
Students will now choose between music/vocal, theater or dance as separate academies.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yW (SGS)

 

Fremont High principal encourages school spirit, success from early age

PLAIN CITY – The first grade students at Plain City Elementary School cheered and shouted as Fremont High School Principal Rod Belnap handed out free T-shirts and a ticket to one of his school’s basketball games.
“Can you believe that?” Belnap said. “In 2028 you’re going to graduate from Fremont High School! Isn’t that amazing?”
Plain City is one of eight elementary schools that feed into Fremont High, and Belnap visited them all with a handful of student body representatives sporting letterman’s jackets with pride one February morning to spread school spirit.
Belnap got the idea for the mini pep rallies at a conference last summer. He’s determined to get students excited about attending his school far before they’re actually old enough.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yS (OSE)

 

Fashion project changes perception of clothing for InTech students

A statewide technology competition has inspired some InTech Collegiate High School students to think more critically about the clothing they wear.
When sophomores Nana Boateng and Chloe Olsen were tasked with creating outfits out of recycled materials for the Technology Student Association state competition earlier this month, they didn’t choose paper or plastic, but rather denim, canvas and lace.
Through their research, the team learned that denim is the No. 1 wasted textile in the county.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yT (LHJ)

 

Utah’s dual language immersion programs

A look into the dual immersion program at East Elementary in Cedar City.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yV (SGS) video

Writing conference invites national bestselling authors, helps teen publish her own novel

SALT LAKE CITY – Maya Angelou once said, “You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have.” And that’s certainly proven true for hundreds of teens who have attended Teen Author Boot Camp.
Teen Author Boot Camp is an annual conference hosted in Utah that encourages teens to improve and expand their creative writing abilities. This year, the conference was held at Utah Valley Convention Center and welcomed over 800 teens on March 25 to attend panels, writing workshops and keynote speeches from national bestselling authors.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9z0 (KSL)

 

Logan students can sleep in next year – a little

LOGAN – A change in class schedules at Logan High School has pushed the entire small city district to later school start times next year.
“Ultimately the goal is to create a school day and school structure that gives kids the best chance for success,” said Logan City School District Superintendent Frank Schofield. He said the community, teachers and students stand to benefit from the changes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9z1 (DN via KSL)

 

Kofi Herrick, Adopted from Ghana Orphanage, is Goal-scoring Threat for Fremont

PLAIN CITY – Kofi Herrick’s skill level on the pitch has never been a question mark for Fremont High boys soccer coach Fred Smith. Smith was enamored with his talent the first time he watched him play.
Success, however, has not come easily. According to Smith, it’s been all about trust. Kofi has struggled to trust his teammates, which has meant he holds the ball at his feet for too long.

Kofi was born in Kumasi, the capital city of the Ashanti region in Ghana. When he was about 3 or 4 years old, he was moved to an orphanage about 40 miles south in a city named Obuasi. His mother had just had a second child and could not provide for both children.
His father was out of the picture completely. Kofi never met him.
Kofi’s mother would visit him about once a year and he would talk to her every couple months, but at first, the transition was rough.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yR (OSE)

 

Best Buddies supports students with special needs

Best Buddies provides many opportunities for students with special needs like the unforgettable Buddy Prom.
Jared Thorkelson, Al Richards and a student buddy pair from Pleasant Grove High School: Meagan Softley and Bella Peterson talk more about the program’s impact.
Best Buddies is a non-profit that helps create one-to-one friendships for students with special needs. There are chapters in a number of Utah high schools and universities and the organization impacts around 1000 Utah students each year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yZ (KTVX)

 

LaVerkin students raise thousands for village school

LAVERKIN – Thanks to the efforts of more than 20 sponsors and the fundraising titans who attend LaVerkin Elementary a remote village school in Guatemala will be issued school books – for the very first time.
A Leadership Day event was held at LaVerkin Elementary School Thursday morning where approximately 20 local leaders were honored during an assembly presented by 5th grade LaVerkin Elementary students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yX (SGN)

 

Layton group giving dads tools they need to do their daughters’ hair

LAYTON – It’s no secret most dads struggle with doing their daughters’ hair. From finicky French braids to impossible ponytails, it seems big, strong hands aren’t meant to handle such delicate strands of hair.
A group in Layton is trying to change that.
On Wednesday night, Layton Community School, with the help of local beauty school Avalon, held a Daddy-Daughter hairdo class at Layton High School to arm dads with the tools they need to tackle the task.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9zb (KSL)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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More changes needed at valley schools
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Mary Chadwick Sharp

Three cheers for the parents, school board, superintendent and all those who recognized the importance of later school starting times for students. The research is clear on this issue, and Logan will reap the benefits.
Perhaps this is also the time to consider two other changes that would benefit students. First, we should combine the valley’s school districts. We are one community. Combined we would be able to use our resources more efficiently. Let’s not spend any more money on studies! We know that two districts cost more than one!
Second, I feel it is time for our public schools to offer a K-8 (kindergarten through 8th grade) school option.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yU

 

Betsy DeVos’ American Carnage
Echoing her boss, she sees horrendous decline in America’s schools-but even the numbers she cites undermine her point.
Slate commentary by Stephen Smiley, a Teacher Project fellow

Throughout the 2016 campaign and since his election victory, Donald Trump has been spinning Americans a bleak yarn of a nation teetering on the brink of collapse. On the campaign trail, he repeatedly insisted that black voters “suffering” under Democratic control had nothing to lose by casting a vote for him. On Inauguration Day, he told of industrial decline and “American carnage.” The president thinks that public schools “deprive” students of knowledge; that inner cities are riddled with crime; that the health care system is about to implode (or perhaps explode); and that the country is losing out big league to allies who’ve been treating Americans like chumps.
But this doomsaying isn’t just coming from the Oval Office. On Wednesday, at a forum at the Brookings Institution in Washington, the president’s Education Secretary Betsy DeVos was asked whether she would concede that when poorly implemented, the “school choice” doctrine she has championed for much of her career could have a negative effect on students. She saw no such risk:
“Well, I’m not sure how they could get a lot worse on, you know, a nationwide basis than they are today,” the secretary said. “The fact that our PISA scores have continued to deteriorate as compared to the rest of the world and, you know, that we’ve seen stagnant-at best-results with the NAEP scores over the years-I’m not sure that we can deteriorate a whole lot.”
American carnage-right in America’s classrooms!
The problem with DeVos’ sweeping assertion-and by extension, her apocalyptic view of American public education-is that the numbers tell a more complex, muddier story. Take PISA, the Programme for International Student Assessment, a test that compares 15-year-olds’ performance across dozens of countries. Depending on how you read the most recent PISA results from 2015, American schools could be described as doing great (we’re ahead of Switzerland in reading, and above France and Sweden in science), as doing OK (the U.S. placed near the middle overall), or as failing miserably (America’s math ranking is bad and has gotten worse since 2012).
And, of course, numbers can also be an unreliable diagnostic tool: Just because you think the PISA or National Assessment of Educational Progress numbers are awful doesn’t mean you know what to do to improve them-or even know how to track that you’re doing something right. DeVos certainly doesn’t seem to: Asked earlier in the Brookings Q&A what dataset could be used to assess her own performance as education secretary in four years’ time, DeVos rambled a little about the primacy of policies that favor choice while conceding, “I’m not a numbers person.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yC

 

Schooled by Politics
The mistakes that sank Republicans on health care plague education reform, too.
U.S. News & World Report op-ed by Andrew J. Rotherham, cofounder and partner at Bellwether Education Partners

The defeat of the Republican plan to overhaul President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act last week offered a stark reminder about how much coalitions, persuasion and raw self-interest matter in politics. President Donald Trump failed to persuade almost anyone to join his side, there was no coalition for reform and the health care law’s benefits for millions of Americans made it in their self-interest to oppose a plan that would have reduced access to health care.
I’m glad that bill failed, but it’s hard to miss how education reformers are making the same strategic mistakes in their approach to politics.
In the 2016 election a few characteristics were key drivers of voting behavior. Two that stand out are educational attainment and where someone lives. Hillary Clinton won college educated voters by four points, according to exit polls, and improved on Obama’s 2012 performance with this demographic by eight points. Among those with postgraduate education, she won 58-37, also an eight-point improvement on Obama’s performance against Mitt Romney. For his part, Trump won rural voters in a 62-34 landslide, and every political analyst now has a nifty shorthand on how a voter’s physical distance from a Starbucks, Uber or Whole Foods predicted their vote.
Not surprisingly, these two demographics are the focus of a lot of political attention. It’s just not coming from education reformers. These voters are not part of any coalition for educational change, see reform as a threat to their interests rather than a benefit, and no one is bothering to persuade them otherwise.
Sound familiar?
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yP

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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DeVos to Use State Accountability Plans to ‘Encourage’ School Choice
The Education Department is clarifying recent comments from Betsy DeVos, who said accountability plans could be a mechanism for pushing states to provide educational options for parents and children.
U.S. News & World Report

The Department of Education’s approval of state accountability plans will not hinge on whether they include school choice policies, but Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos will use the process as an opportunity to “encourage” states to adopt those policies, a department official clarified Thursday.
“She will certainly encourage states to think boldly and embrace school choice and provide more options for students,” an Education Department official says. “There is a distinction between encourage and compel. This administration will encourage states to embrace choice and share best practices, but that’s not compulsion.”
The department official continued: “[The Every Student Succeeds Act] is being implemented based solely on what’s being required by law, and stating anything to the contrary is taking out of context the secretary’s remarks. There’s a distinction between compelling and encouraging, and she’s always been consistent that ESSA will be implemented as Congress intended.”
The remarks in question occurred Wednesday at the Brookings Institution, when DeVos said during an interview that the new education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act, could be a mechanism for pushing states to provide educational options for parents and children.
Her comments Wednesday, and those clarified through the department official Thursday, roiled the education space as earlier this week President Donald Trump signed into law a resolution that eliminated an Obama-era accountability regulation and in doing so was supposed to prevent future secretaries of education from using its authority to persuade or demand states adopt certain education policies.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yK

 

Betsy DeVos slams Denver schools for offering “accessibility without choices”
A new Brookings report gives Denver Schools the top score for school choice
Chalkbeat Colorado via Denver Post

Earlier this month, U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos praised Denver’s efforts to support school choice. That changed Wednesday.
Speaking at the Brookings Institution Wednesday, she called out Denver as an example of a district that appears to be choice-friendly – but actually lacks sufficient options for families.
A new Brookings report gave the city the top score for school choice, citing the unified application process that allows families to consider charter and district-run schools at the same time. But DeVos implied that without vouchers to pay for private schools (something Colorado’s state Supreme Court has twice ruled unconstitutional) and a sufficient supply of charter schools, Denver’s application process amounts to an optical illusion.
“The benefits of making choices accessible are canceled out when you don’t have a full menu of options,” she said, pointing to New Orleans as a better example of the choice ecosystem she’d like to see. “Choice without accessibility doesn’t matter. Just like accessibility without choices doesn’t matter. Neither scenario ultimately benefits students.”
The harsh criticism comes just weeks after DeVos publicly praised Denver’s efforts to solve a thorny challenge complicating school choice across the country: transportation. In a speech to the Council of Great City Schools, a group of leaders and school board members of America’s large school districts, she praised the “Success Express” that shuttles students in a handful of neighborhoods to both charter and district schools. But transportation challenges continue to prevent families from taking advantage of the options that do exist.
Denver Public Schools’ Superintendent Tom Boasberg released the following statement responding to DeVos’s comments:
“We respectfully disagree with Secretary DeVos. We do not support private school vouchers. We believe that public dollars should be used for public schools that are open to all kids, whether they are district-run or charter. A core principle in Denver and one of the main reasons we rank No. 1 nationally in school choice is that we ensure equitable systems of enrollment among district-run and charter schools, where all schools play by the same enrollment rules and all schools are subject to the same rigorous accountability system. We do not support choice without accountability.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yL

 

Arizona taxpayer-funded vouchers benefiting students in more-affluent areas
(Phoenix) Arizona Republic

As Arizona’s school-voucher program has expanded rapidly in the past year, students using taxpayer aid to transfer from public to private schools are abandoning higher-performing districts in more-affluent areas, according to an Arizona Republic analysis.
This year, more than 75 percent of the money pulled out of public schools for the Empowerment Scholarship Account program came from districts with an “A” or “B” rating, the analysis showed. By contrast, only 4 percent of the money came from school districts rated “D” or lower.
The findings undercut a key contention of the lawmakers and advocacy groups pressing to expand the state’s ESA program: that financially disadvantaged families from struggling schools reap the benefit of expanded school choice.
Critics, meanwhile, argue the program is largely being used by more-affluent families to subsidize their private-school tuition bills. The ESA program allows parents to take 90 percent of the money that would have gone to their school district and put it toward private school, home schooling and other educational programs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yO

 

Why high court’s ruling on special education meant so much to parents
Beyond the legal implications, the Supreme Court’s unanimous decision is evidence of the shift in the way America thinks about people with disabilities, special needs advocates say.
Christian Science Monitor

When Robert Curtis read the United States Supreme Court’s landmark ruling on special-needs children, he was elated.
“Huge!” says the father of a special-needs fifth-grader. “Really heartwarming.”
That is in part because the opinion, signed by Chief Justice Roberts, was unanimous; and in part because the wording, squarely on the side of parents, was in sharp contrast to what educators had sometimes told him when he worked with a school team to plan his daughter Hannah’s education.
“We’re running a school here, not a hospital. If she needs to be in a wheelchair then she needs to be at a school that can handle it,” he recalls one school administrator telling him.
The high court’s decision last week will give parents a powerful tool to demand higher standards for their special-needs children, advocates say. Overturning a lower court ruling that said a school was only required to provide a “merely more than de minimis” education, the high court said that the 1975 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) meant that such children “must be given an educational program reasonably calculated to enable a child to make progress.” It will force schools to loosen their purse strings and allow educators, who often want the same rigor as parents, to write bolder individualized education programs (IEPs).
“There was actually compassion being projected from the Supreme Court,” Mr. Curtis says. “In the current political climate, I had become resigned to the fact that things were just going to get harder.”
Beyond the legal implications, the court’s bipartisan decision is evidence of the leaps-and-bounds shift over the past 40 years in the way America thinks about people with disabilities, special needs advocates say. Stigma and low expectations have been replaced with a conviction that every child should have the right to reach their potential.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yz

 

Appeals Court Rejects Race-Bias Challenge to Drug Testing at a Catholic High School
Education Week

A federal appeals court has rejected a challenge to student drug testing at a Roman Catholic high school, holding that claims of race discrimination in the administration of the testing lacked evidence.
A unanimous three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit, in Chicago, also ruled that the testing did not involve government action, even though Marian Catholic High School in Chicago Heights, Ill., has received federal grants for the drug testing.
The high school, run by the Dominican Sisters, requires its students to sign contracts about conduct that include giving the school permission to perform random drug tests. (The appeals court said the contracts, and the question of whether students could legally enter into them, were not at issue in the case.)
In the 2015-16 academic year, the school used a method that involved taking a hair sample from the student and sending it off to be tested. Students who test positive are subject to counseling or expulsion.
The program was challenged by seven students who received false positive readings on the school drug tests. Each tested positive for cocaine in the school’s test, and then did second tests with other health providers, and all tested negative.
Six of the students are African-American and one is white.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9z3

A copy of the ruling
http://gousoe.uen.org/9z4 (Seventh U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals)

 

Climate Change Skeptic Group Seeks to Influence 200,000 Teachers
PBS Frontline

Twenty-five thousand science teachers opened their mailboxes this month and found a package from the Heartland Institute, a libertarian think tank that rejects the scientific consensus on climate change.
It contained the organization’s book “Why Scientists Disagree About Global Warming,” as well as a DVD rejecting the human role in climate change and arguing instead that rising temperatures have been caused primarily by natural phenomena. The material will be sent to an additional 25,000 teachers every two weeks until every public-school science teacher in the nation has a copy, Heartland president and CEO Joseph Bast said in an interview last week. If so, the campaign would reach more than 200,000 K-12 science teachers.
Accompanying the materials is a cover letter from Lennie Jarratt, project manager of Heartland’s Center for Transforming Education. He asks teachers to “consider the possibility” that the science is not settled. “If that’s the case, then students would be better served by letting them know a vibrant debate is taking place among scientists,” he writes. The letter also points teachers to an online guide to using the DVD in their classrooms.
The Heartland initiative dismisses multiple studies showing scientists are in near unanimous agreement that humans are changing the climate. Even if human activity is contributing to climate change, the book argues, it “would probably not be harmful, because many areas of the world would benefit from or adjust to climate change.”
The campaign elicited immediate derision from the National Center for Science Education (NCSE), a nonprofit in Oakland, California that monitors climate change education in classrooms.
“It’s not science, but it’s dressed up to look like science,” said NCSE executive director Ann Reid. “It’s clearly intended to confuse teachers.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yN

 

Here’s The Real Way To Fix The Teen Sleep Loss Epidemic
It’s not later school start times, but here’s what might actually work, according to a new study.
Huffington Post

Delaying school start times has been universally touted as the answer to the growing epidemic of teenage sleep deprivation, but this common orthodoxy may be based in false ideas about how teen biological clocks really work.
The argument for later start times hinges on the fact that teenagers prefer to go to bed and sleep in later because of a delay in their circadian clocks that govern the body’s rhythms of sleep and waking. To be more in line with teens’ “natural” sleep patterns, thousands of U.S. high schools have pushed back their morning schedules in recent years.
But the solution may not be so simple, according to new research from Harvard Medical School and the University of Surrey in the U.K.
The research collaboration between mathematicians and sleep scientists used a complex mathematical model to show that delaying school start times is unlikely to do much to ease high school students’ sleep deprivation.
Why? Because teenagers with later school start times stay up even later in the evenings, thereby increasing their exposure to artificial light, which can further mess with their circadian rhythms. A far more effective solution to teenage sleep deprivation, the study’s authors suggest, would be to turn down the lights and limit screen time in the evenings.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yt

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yu (Scientific Reports)

 

Study: A Teacher’s Encouragement Gives Students a Lasting Boost
Education Week

Students whose teachers offer encouragement are more likely to continue their education beyond the age of 16 than those who don’t get the same support, according to a new study out of the University of Cambridge in the U.K.
The study also revealed that a teacher’s encouragement has a much greater impact on students with average grades and parents with limited educations. These students who reported receiving positive feedback from their teachers more often finished high school and pursued college degrees.
“When people speak of a positive school experience, they frequently cite a personal relationship with a teacher, and the encouragement they were given,” study author Ben Alcott said in a statement. “Our research helps quantify that impact and show its significance, particularly for addressing social mobility.” Alcott is currently a lecturer at the University of Cambridge where his research addresses education access and inequalities in learning outcomes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9z5

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9z6 (Research in Higher Education)

 

Hedge Fund Pioneer’s Investing Advice for Kids: Learn Coding
New York benefit previews kids’ program language Scratch 3.0
Bloomberg

David Siegel has some advice for kids with an appetite for investing — they should start from Scratch.
Siegel, the quantitative hedge-fund pioneer and co-chairman of Two Sigma, was at the Scratch Foundation benefit Wednesday night at the event space Tribeca Three Sixty in Manhattan. Siegel, a foundation co-founder, said Scratch, an easy-to-use free program, encourages kids to learn coding as technology comes to dominate his world of finance.
“With Scratch, in one day, you’ll be able to create something that will make you go, ‘Wow! I did that,'” Siegel said. “It allows kids and even adults to express their ideas in an algorithm, and that inspires you to learn more.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9yM

 

The Psychological Approach to Educating Kids
Increased focus on kids’ psychological health may seem like the education world’s flavor of the day, but it’s achieving results.
Atlantic

On a recent Monday morning, 25 freshmen filed into Rudolph “Keeth” Matheny’s wood-paneled portable classroom on the campus of Austin High School in Austin, Texas. But not before the shake. Matheny greeted each student by name, then extended his hand.
“I won the handshake competition, and there’s an art to it,” one student said. “You have to do webbing to webbing, that’s the trick.” Shake firmly, but not too hard, look the person in the eye, smile. The student demonstrated and, indeed, his handshake was a winner.
In addition to perfecting handshakes, Matheny, an ex-college football coach, teaches Methods for Academic and Personal Success (MAPS), and he happens to be on the frontlines of a growing movement in education: social-emotional learning (SEL). SEL-also called whole-child education-is a systematic, evidence-based approach to teaching kids how to achieve goals, understand and manage emotions, build empathy, forge relationships, and make responsible decisions. In 2012, the Chicago-based nonprofit Collaborative for Academic Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL) partnered with eight districts around the country to implement SEL in their schools. Today, CASEL is working with 10 large districts-including Anchorage, Alaska; Austin; Chicago; Cleveland; Nashville, Tennessee; and Oakland, California-and a growing number of smaller ones. These partnerships mean more than 1 million U.S. school children are enrolled in schools that have implemented or are in the process of implementing a social-emotional learning strategy.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9za

 

CDC, SHAPE America Provide Schools Strategies for Successful Recess
Education Week

Administrators looking to add recess to their school’s schedule have some new resources to help make that happen.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and SHAPE America, the Society of Health and Physical Educators, have released two guidance documents entitled, “Strategies for Recess in Schools” and “Recess Planning in Schools: A Guide to Putting Strategies for Recess Into Practice.”
Both the CDC and SHAPE America recommend that students in elementary school have 20 minutes of daily recess, but sometimes schools struggle with figuring out how to fit that time into an already packed schedule.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9z7

Copies of the studies
http://gousoe.uen.org/9z8 (SHAPE America)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9z9 (SHAPE America)

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

April 3:

Audit Subcommittee of the Legislative Management Committee meeting
3 p.m., 250 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002093.htm

April 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
2750 University Park Blvd., Layton
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

April 21:

Utah State Board of Education Law and Licensing Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

Utah State Board of Education Finance Committee meeting
1 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

April 26:

Utah State Board of Education Standards and Assessment Committee meeting
9:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 4:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

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