Education News Roundup: April 4, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Spring at the Utah State Board of Education office.

Audit finds privatizing the state’s student information system could cost millions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Aa (DN)
or a copy of the audit
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ab (Legislature)

The group that brought the lawsuit against the State Superintendent over the soon-to-be-defunct ‘no homo promo’ law are open to negotiating an end to the case.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ah (AP via SLT)

President Trump tells CEOs that he’s planning to spend a lot of money on education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9AI (USN&WR)

Survey of school IT leaders finds mobile learning and cybersecurity are top issues.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9AE (Ed Week)
or a copy of the survey
http://gousoe.uen.org/9AF (Consortium for School Networking)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Audit: Privatizing student information system could cost millions

Utah LGBT-rights group plans to negotiate school lawsuit

Utah’s Cloud Flexibility Welcomes Innovative IoT and AI Solutions
In an interview with Route Fifty, state CIO Mike Hussey discusses rural broadband and lingering “last mile” challenges.

Utah Military Academy moves location after push-back

Student projects from InTech Collegiate High School win TSA Conference awards

So. Utah teen recovers from severe burns in SL hospital after shocked during school project

Ogden native and mom of slain Sandy Hook student pens book about healing

Weber High softball team uses practice time for community service

Utah school finds success in helping students deal with emotions

New LDS pilot programs bring education to Mormon children in island nations

Top photos of March show the value of STEM education in schools

St. George police looking for man making lewd gestures at high school girls

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Bringing education freedom to NH

NATION

Trump Promises to Spend Big on Education Weeks After Proposing Billions in Cuts
The president touted the benefits of charter schools and local control when asked about how the administration might help give students the skills CEOs are looking for.

DeVos promotes school vouchers during Fort Bragg visit

Blackwater founder held secret Seychelles meeting to establish Trump-Putin back channel

Teacher licensing overhaul makes legislative progress

Principals’ Test Not Predictive of Success on the Job
Exam results show racial disparities

The Alt-Right Curriculum
Teachers are facilitating conversations with students about white nationalism.

Assemblyman Tony Thurmond enters the state superintendent for public instruction race as a Trump foe

Lawmakers hold first meeting to examine school funding model

North Dakota May Let Lawmakers Take Guns in Public Buildings

Improving Mobile Learning, Cybersecurity Among Top Priorities for School IT Leaders

Learning to Think Like a Computer

Japan Cabinet Allows Schools to Study Banned Imperial Order

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Audit: Privatizing student information system could cost millions

SALT LAKE CITY — A legislative audit released Monday recommends the Utah State Board of Education determine whether a student information system should be privatized given the price tag for eliminating it could reach $7 million the first year.
The system that cost approximately $1.1 million in the 2016 budget year is available to public education entities without charge to track academic progress, attendance and other data used to determine state and federal funding.
The Legislature’s Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee sought the review because a private vendor raised concerns of unfair competition from the state system known as Aspire, according to the legislative auditor general’s audit.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Aa (DN)

A copy of the audit
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ab (Legislature)

 

Utah LGBT-rights group plans to negotiate school lawsuit

An LGBT-rights group says it plans to start negotiating with Utah officials about a lawsuit challenging the state’s ban on the “advocacy of homosexuality” in schools.
State lawmakers recently approved a measure that gets rid of this ban. It is expected to go into effect in May.
Equality Utah’s Troy Williams said Monday that they plan to talk with the attorney general’s office and the state’s board of education to make sure all of Utah’s school districts will implement the policy change. He says they’re optimistic about a positive resolution.
The National Center for Lesbian Rights and Equality Utah had sued the state education board last fall, saying the law creates a “chilling culture of silence that stigmatizes LGBTQ students.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ah (AP via SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9An (AP via OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ai (AP via PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ao (AP via CVD)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Aq (AP via KUTV)

 

Utah’s Cloud Flexibility Welcomes Innovative IoT and AI Solutions
In an interview with Route Fifty, state CIO Mike Hussey discusses rural broadband and lingering “last mile” challenges.

The Utah Department of Technology Services developed a cloud-hosted driver’s license practice exam app for the Amazon Echo that won Amazon Web Services’ City on a Cloud Innovation Challenge in July.
Alexa, the personal assistant device’s voice technology, walks users through test questions and statistics—the “skill” earning the state valuable, free Amazon cloud storage as a prize.
Aside from offsetting some of the cost of storage, the app represents Utah’s increasing fascination with the Internet of Things and even artificial intelligence as ways to provide services that include something as precise as informing residents of the best place to fish on any given day.
“We’re looking at developing some new apps and making them Amazon-esque, where it’s one-click [fishing or driver’s license] renewal using the Echo. I think other states are looking at that,” Utah CIO Mike Hussey told Route Fifty in an interview. “I was out at Amazon 6 to 8 months ago, and the talk was our app. I think everybody took from that, ‘Let’s expand our thinking on how we allow constituents to interface with the state.’”
To that end, it helps DTS has been centralized for more than a decade, granting Hussey the flexibility to change course when needed. Centralized data centers virtualize 90 percent of Utah’s information in a private cloud, the state shifting particular operations to the cloud only when it makes sense.

The Utah Education Network boasts some of the best 10-gigabit connectivity in the state, Hussey said, so discussions on some kind of partnership are ongoing. DTS is also looking at using the Utah Department of Transportation’s extensive fiber network.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9AH ([Washington, DC] Route Fifty)

Utah Military Academy moves location after push-back

LEHI, Utah — Earlier this year a Lehi community fought back against the Utah Military Academy building a new campus in their neighborhood. Last month the neighborhood, the city and the academy all came to a compromise. The academy has decided to move to another part of town.
The original plan was for the academy’s new campus to be built on a five-acre lot on the corner of Pioneer Crossing and Center Street.
Neighbors were concerned about hundreds of additional cars driving through their residential streets every day.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ar (KSTU)

 

Student projects from InTech Collegiate High School win TSA Conference awards

Members of InTech Collegiate High School’s Technology Student Association (TSA) made an impressive showing at the Utah TSA State Conference, which took place March 14-15, at the Davis Applied Technology College in Kaysville. Eight of the school’s projects placed in the top three of their respective categories, with four of the honors being first place awards. Students involved with those four projects will advance to the TSA National Conference, being held June 20-25, in Orlando, Florida.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ap (CVD)

 

So. Utah teen recovers from severe burns in SL hospital after shocked during school project

SALT LAKE – A 17-year-old high school student from Santa Clara is recovering at the University of Utah burn center in Salt Lake.
Decker Haberl is recovering from serious burn injuries. His mother Kate tells Fox 13 he was working alone on an art project outside of class at Snow Canyon High School, using jumper cables.
“While he was working on it, somehow got shocked. It was enough to drop him instantly. When he fell, he broke a couple teeth on the way down. Landed on the jumper cables and so he had an initial shock,” said Kate.
Decker was severely burned and shocked. His mother says he damaged multiple fingers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9As (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9At (KSTU via SGN)

Ogden native and mom of slain Sandy Hook student pens book about healing

Alissa Parker struggled to forgive the man who shot and killed several adults and 20 children at Sandy Hook Elementary School five years ago, one of whom was her 6-year-old daughter, Emilie.
That’s when the grieving mother got a phone call from the parent of a girl who had been close friends with Emilie when the family lived in New Mexico.
The young girl was struggling with losing Emilie and was scared of going to school, but she had recently come out of her shell. While playing in her room one day, she said she could feel Emilie was with her.
“Oftentimes, we don’t talk about experiences we have with people who have passed in modern day,” Parker said. “I was experiencing these little sweet, tender miracles and feeling her presence and influence within our family, so I began to share them.”
Those moments inspired Parker to write “An Unseen Angel: A Mother’s Story of Healing and Hope After Sandy Hook.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Al (OSE)

Weber High softball team uses practice time for community service

OGDEN — There’s winning on the field, and winning in the community.
Weber High softball coach Kylee Colvin obviously wants her team to do the former, but she’s also determined to teach them the latter.
Last Friday, Colvin took her team to the Marshall White Center in Ogden to do a service project. Members of the team helped paint the boys locker room and also touched up other areas of the community recreation center.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Am (OSE)

 

Utah school finds success in helping students deal with emotions

SALT LAKE CITY — A few years ago, Nicole O’Brien became principal of Rose Park Elementary School and inherited a steady stream of students sent to her office to be reprimanded for problem behavior.
Pretty soon, O’Brien noticed that the children were missing something.
“I just saw this big hole in our kids,” she said. “They did not have emotional self-awareness.”
O’Brien said traditional methods, like suspending children who act out, did not sit well with her.
“The kids would get in trouble or they get frustrated, and then an adult would get frustrated, and things would escalate. And I thought there has to be a better way,” O’Brien said.
The better way turned out to be five colors.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Au (KSL)

 

New LDS pilot programs bring education to Mormon children in island nations

PROVO — The LDS Church has launched pilot programs that are bringing education to children in Vanuatu, Samoa and Papua New Guinea.
The first pilot is called “extra class” by students in Vanuatu who meet in two meetinghouses of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, said Stephanie Allen Egbert, associate director of the faith’s new Global Education Initiative.
The program provides homework help and study sessions for students in grades 7 through 10. They meet two days a week for two hours with church service missionaries who tutor them. The missionaries also provide a religious lesson and English skill development.
All three pilots were approved by the LDS Church Board of Education in May 2016.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Aj (DN)

 

Top photos of March show the value of STEM education in schools

Flowers weren’t the only things to bloom this March. Many Utahns were out and about, participating in school events and trying new things.
Students from several Utah high schools were captured by Deseret News photographers, using new virtual reality technology, showing off robots they made during class in competition and playing with science.
One 12th-grade student at Herriman High School can be seen wearing a virtual reality headset that showcases the dangers of distracted driving for Distracted Driving Awareness Week.
Other students from East High prepare to show off the robot they created in a technology and robotics competition in West Valley City. Even Gov. Gary Herbert admires a robot created at Oquirrh Hills Middle School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ak (DN)

 

St. George police looking for man making lewd gestures at high school girls

St. George police on alert right now after multiple reports of a man pulling up in his white pickup truck and making sexually inappropriate comments towards underage high school students.
Officer Lona Trombley, police spokeswoman, said Monday that incidents have been occurring over the last few weeks but all at separate times.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Av (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Aw (KTVX)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Bringing education freedom to NH
Manchester (NH) Union Leader op-ed by JEB BUSH, founder, president and chairman of the board of directors of the Foundation for Excellence in Education

Since our nation was founded, the “Live Free or Die’’ state has stood out for its embrace of individual liberty. This makes pending legislation (SB 193) that would set up Education Freedom Savings Accounts a natural fit for New Hampshire families.
The first two words here are key: education freedom.
The current, outdated model of public education is based on funding government bureaucracies that in turn make decisions best left to families, such as decisions on where kids will go to school and what classes they can take.
The proposed accounts would instead fund students directly and let parents make those decisions. If, for whatever reason, a public school isn’t working for their child, they can find a better fit in another school. They also can access the funds for online classes, tutors and supplies. Or if they are the parents of a student with disabilities, they can use the funds for approved therapies critical to their child’s development.
These accounts are an acknowledgment that parents, not government institutions, are the best decision makers for children. They love them the most, know them the best, and are the ones most vested in their future success. And therefore, they should be given the freedom and resources to pursue the right education options for them.
This legislation is not an attack on public schools. It simply is an acknowledgment that kids are unique individuals and one size does not fit all.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9AJ

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Trump Promises to Spend Big on Education Weeks After Proposing Billions in Cuts
The president touted the benefits of charter schools and local control when asked about how the administration might help give students the skills CEOs are looking for.
U.S. News & World Report

Just weeks after President Donald Trump proposed axing $9 billion in federal education programs, he said his administration is planning to “spend a lot of money” on education in order to increase the number of students graduating with the skills needed to fill current employment gaps.
“We’re going to spend a lot of money … and we’re going to get some great talent having to do with education because there is nothing more important than education,” he said at a town hall for CEOs Tuesday morning.
The comments were in response to a question about how the administration might help better prepare students to graduate with the skills CEOs are looking for, in particular through the expansion of apprenticeship programs and public-private partnerships.
But in answering, Trump largely fell back to campaign rhetoric, slamming the Common Core State Standards, touting the benefits of charter schools, and promising to return the decision-making power over education to state and local school leaders.
“I like the fact we’re getting rid of Common Core,” Trump said. “We have to end it. We have to bring education local.”
Common Core is the set of academic benchmarks for what students should know by the time they finish each grade. They were develop by the National Governors Association and business groups in direct response to business leaders complaining that students were not graduating high school with the skills and knowledge needed for college and career.
“We can’t be managing education from Washington,” Trump continued to riff off his comments about the Common Core. “When I go out to Iowa, and when I go out to the different states, they want to run their school programs locally and they’ll do a much better job. These are some very good people in Washington, but you also have bureaucrats that make a lot of money and don’t really care that much about what they’re doing or the community that they have never seen.”
Notably, decisions over academic standards have always been a state responsibility and not something handed down by the federal government. The new federal education law, signed into law a year before Trump took office, made that even more explicit in prohibiting the education secretary from in any way forcing states to adopt certain standards.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9AI

 

DeVos promotes school vouchers during Fort Bragg visit
Charlotte (NC) News-Observer

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, while visiting a primary school on the Army base, voiced support for allowing some children in military families to use federal vouchers to attend schools they choose.
During her meeting with parents and teachers at the Kimberly Hampton Primary School, at least one parent told her he would welcome the chance to send his older children to a private high school that matches the quality of the base schools.
The Department of Defense runs eight schools on and near Fort Bragg that enroll 4,044 children from pre-kindergarten to middle school. High school students enroll in public school in surrounding districts.
The local high schools “don’t necessarily work for every child,” said DeVos, an ardent school-choice supporter.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Az

 

Blackwater founder held secret Seychelles meeting to establish Trump-Putin back channel
Washington Post

The United Arab Emirates arranged a secret meeting in January between Blackwater founder Erik Prince and a Russian close to President Vladi­mir Putin as part of an apparent effort to establish a back-channel line of communication between Moscow and President-elect Donald Trump, according to U.S., European and Arab officials.
The meeting took place around Jan. 11 — nine days before Trump’s inauguration — in the Seychelles islands in the Indian Ocean, officials said. Though the full agenda remains unclear, the UAE agreed to broker the meeting in part to explore whether Russia could be persuaded to curtail its relationship with Iran, including in Syria, a Trump administration objective that would be likely to require major concessions to Moscow on U.S. sanctions.
Though Prince had no formal role with the Trump campaign or transition team, he presented himself as an unofficial envoy for Trump to high-ranking Emiratis involved in setting up his meeting with the Putin confidant, according to the officials, who did not identify the Russian.
Prince was an avid supporter of Trump. After the Republican convention, he contributed $250,000 to Trump’s campaign, the national party and a pro-Trump super PAC led by GOP mega-donor Rebekah Mercer, records show. He has ties to people in Trump’s circle, including Stephen K. Bannon, now serving as the president’s chief strategist and senior counselor. Prince’s sister Betsy DeVos serves as education secretary in the Trump administration. And Prince was seen in the Trump transition offices in New York in December.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9A9

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ac (USAT)

 

Teacher licensing overhaul makes legislative progress
St. Paul (MN) Pioneer Press

The Minnesota Legislature is moving ahead with what many agree is a long overdue overhaul of the way the state licenses educators.
The House approved a bill Monday afternoon with a 76-55 vote that will transfer licensing powers away from the state Department of Education and Board of Teaching and consolidate it under a new Professional Educator Licensing Board. The legislation also creates a new four-tiered licensing system that lawmakers hope will be easier for prospective educators to understand.
“Our state is facing a teacher shortage, and it is more important than ever that we get the most effective teachers in our classrooms,” said Rep. Sondra Erickson, R-Princeton, who chairs the House Education Innovation Policy committee and is chief sponsor of the bill. “For too long the difficulty of navigating the licensure process has served as a barrier to getting qualified and motivated individuals into careers in education.”
Democrats expressed concerns the new tiered licensing system could lead to some school districts hiring less qualified teachers to save money. The new tiered system provides licenses, of varying lengths of time, for educators with different amounts of training and experience.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ag

 

Principals’ Test Not Predictive of Success on the Job
Exam results show racial disparities
Education Week

New research has found essentially no positive correlation between how would-be principals perform on a widely used licensure exam and their success as school leaders.
The study, which looked at principals’ performance on the School Leaders Licensure Assessment (SLLA) and on-the-job evaluations, student achievement, and teacher surveys, over a 10-year period in Tennessee, also found that non-white candidates were about three times less likely than white candidates to pass the exam.
The researchers found that candidates with higher passing scores were more likely to be hired as principals. And because Tennessee has the lowest cut score among the states that use the SLLA, disparities in passing rates for white and non-white candidates could be greater in states that set higher cut scores, said Jason A. Grissom, the lead researcher and an associate professor of public policy and education at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn.
The study’s findings could have major implications for districts and states beyond Tennessee, where K-12 officials are trying to increase the numbers of racially and ethnically diverse educators. Students of color now make up a slight majority of public school enrollment, but the education workforce remains largely white.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9AD

 

The Alt-Right Curriculum
Teachers are facilitating conversations with students about white nationalism.
Atlantic

Dropping a handout with a photo on each student’s desk, the teacher Kathryn Leslie asked the teens to study the picture of Richard Spencer, the leader of the “alt-right” movement who advocates for a homeland just for whites. There was Spencer, the image of confidence, smiling in a suit coat and open-collared shirt as he leaned against a brick wall.
Does Spencer, Leslie asked her Brookline High School students, fit the stereotype of a white nationalist? Spencer had no visible tattoos advertising white pride or hate against non-whites or non-Christians. He also had graduated from college.
“Sometimes, our stereotype of a white nationalist can be different than a young, articulate, clean-cut guy who espouses lots of racist views,” said Leslie.
The high-school sophomores and their pair of teachers at the suburban Boston high school were tackling a subject that many adults have struggled to understand—the so-called alt-right movement and how it and its main figurehead, Spencer, managed to surface in the mainstream in the 2016 election and afterward. It’s a topic many teachers would prefer to avoid, given how polarized America has become over the election of President Donald Trump and anything remotely related.
The subject, though, was a natural for Leslie and Malcolm Cawthorne, who co-teach a course about race and identity in America and how it plays out in students’ lives, school, town, and nation. Cawthorne, who is black, recruited Leslie, who is white, to co-teach the elective because he wanted students to realize that many whites care about confronting racism. He and Leslie teach in a school that has gone from 71 percent white two decades ago to 55 percent now. They are helping their students, many of whom identify with more than one race, sort out their own racial and ethnic identities in two sections of the course.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9AG

 

Assemblyman Tony Thurmond enters the state superintendent for public instruction race as a Trump foe
Los Angeles Times

State Assemblyman Tony Thurmond (D-Richmond) will run for state superintendent of public instruction.
He announced his candidacy in a statement Monday that focused on resisting the Trump administration’s education plans.
“Fighting for education starts with opposing the efforts by President Trump and Betsy DeVos to defund our public schools,” Thurmond said in the statement, referring to Trump’s budget blueprint. “I will fight the Trump Agenda to gut our public schools at every step.”
The statement said he had already scored the endorsement of U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.)
Thurmond could not be reached immediately for further comment.
So far, the only other candidate is Marshall Tuck, a charter school ally who lost a bid for the position in 2014. The primary is in June 2018.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ad

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ae (Sacramento Bee)

Lawmakers hold first meeting to examine school funding model
Casper (WY) Star-Tribune

Lawmakers and educators met Monday to begin the process of adjusting — or fully replacing — the state’s education funding model, which faces a $400 million annual shortfall in the coming years.
The meeting comes as educators begin grappling with recent cuts and lawmakers plan the next move in dealing with the crisis. At least one school district has already passed a resolution authorizing a lawsuit in the future, while other boards are poised to do the same. Educators have said recent cuts by the Legislature have exceeded what is statutorily and constitutionally allowed.
Legislators hope the funding model examination process, known as recalibration, will help tackle the situation by looking at the model as a whole.
Recalibration is used to determine what constitutes an adequate education and what it will cost to deliver that schooling. It normally happens every five years and was set to begin again in 2020. But the massive education deficit ready to hit in the next two-year budget cycle has accelerated a timeline established more than a decade ago under the watchful eye of the Wyoming Supreme Court.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Af

North Dakota May Let Lawmakers Take Guns in Public Buildings
Associated Press

BISMARCK, N.D. — North Dakota’s pro-gun Legislature on Tuesday approved allowing lawmakers and other qualified elected officials to carry hidden firearms into government buildings, including the state Capitol, and at public gatherings, including sporting events or even schools.
The bill heads to Republican Gov. Doug Burgum after the House approved it 86-5 with no debate. The Senate approved it 44-2 in January.
Under the bill, qualified elected officials would have to maintain the same firearm competency requirements as law enforcement officers and hold an enhanced concealed carry permit. They would join municipal and district court judges, retired law enforcement officers and members of the attorney general’s staff as those allowed to pack hidden guns at a publicly owned or operated building. North Dakota law defines a “public gathering” as an athletic or sporting event, a school or school function.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9AC

Improving Mobile Learning, Cybersecurity Among Top Priorities for School IT Leaders
Education Week

Efforts to improve mobile learning, boost broadband capacity, and protect cybersecurity are the three top priorities for IT leaders in K-12 school systems, though those administrators continue to face financial and personnel shortages that hamper their work, according to a new survey.
The 2017 K-12 IT Leadership Survey was released today by the Consortium for School Networking, which represents chief technology officers around the country. The survey, conducted this year in partnership with MDR, is based on data collected from 495 respondents—either chief technology officers or other IT leaders—in school districts.
“The pressure on chief technology officers is enormous because [they’re] being asked to do more every year,” said Keith Krueger, CEO of the Consortium for School Networking, in an interview.
The survey also reinforced a lack of diversity among district tech leaders, and disparities in how much top female administrators in those roles are being paid, compared with their male counterparts.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9AE

A copy of the survey
http://gousoe.uen.org/9AF (Consortium for School Networking)

 

Learning to Think Like a Computer
New York Times

In “The Beauty and Joy of Computing,” the course he helped conceive for nonmajors at the University of California, Berkeley, Daniel Garcia explains an all­important concept in computer science — abstraction — in terms of milkshakes.
“There is a reason when you go to the ‘Joy of Cooking’ and you want to make a strawberry milkshake, you don’t look under ‘strawberry milkshake,’ ” he said. Rather, there is a recipe for milkshakes that instructs you to add ice cream, milk and
fruit of your choice. While earlier cookbooks may have had separate recipes for strawberry milkshakes, raspberry milkshakes and boysenberry milkshakes, eventually, he imagines, someone said, “Why don’t we collapse that into one milkshake recipe?”
“The idea of abstraction,” he said, “is to hide the details.” It requires recognizing patterns and distilling complexity into a precise, clear summary. It’s like the countdown to a space launch that runs through a checklist — life support, fuel, payload — in which each check represents perhaps 100 checks that have been performed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ay

 

Japan Cabinet Allows Schools to Study Banned Imperial Order
Associated Press

TOKYO — Opposition politicians on Tuesday criticized a decision by Japan’s Cabinet to allow schools to study a 19th century imperial order on education that was banned after World War II for promoting militarism and emperor worship, saying it’s a sign that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government is becoming more nationalistic.
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told reporters the Imperial Rescript on Education should be allowed as teaching material if it is used in line with the constitution and the education law. The Cabinet adopted the policy Friday. He added, however, that schools should primarily follow the government-approved curriculum.
Opposition politicians on Tuesday called the move unconstitutional and unacceptable.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9AA

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

April 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
2750 University Park Blvd., Layton
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

April 21:

Utah State Board of Education Law and Licensing Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

Utah State Board of Education Finance Committee meeting
1 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

April 26:

Utah State Board of Education Standards and Assessment Committee meeting
9:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 4:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

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