Education News Roundup: April 7, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Teachers are taking a closer look at the proposed pay package in Jordan.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CB (SLT)

Utah Public Radio looks at a disagreement between Moab and SITLA.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9D0 (UPR)

Indiana takes a look at UPSTART.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9D1 (Chalkbeat)

Educators nationally are taking a closer look at what loser privacy protections mean for schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CV (Ed Week)

Washington Post figures security measures for Secretary DeVos tally $1 million per month.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CI (WaPo)

New Mexico outlaws ‘school lunch shaming.’
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CZ (NYT)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Midcareer teachers feel overlooked in proposed Jordan School District salary plan
Jordan School District » Reforms would pump $10 million into pay, but distribution questioned.

Will SITLA Play ‘Hardball’ With Moab Development?

How a computer program designed for home-based preschool in Utah could get a piece of Indiana’s education budget

Utah 2017 Legislative Session education bills increase budget, privacy protections

North Logan family continues title run at state geography bee

Sexual orientation question remains off high school student survey after districts object

‘Passing the trash’: 2 women say the teachers who sexually abused them were allowed to continue teaching

Utah teen ‘disappointed’ that victims didn’t die in November locker-room attack, assistant principal recalls
School stabbings » Four guilty pleas entered in juvenile, one in adult court.

Elementary school in Taylorsville shelters-in-place as police search for sexual assault suspect

Utah teen named Air Force’s ‘Military Child of the Year’

The Gail S. Halvorsen Aviation Education Foundation plans new home in Spanish Fork

6th grader holds penny drive to help against child abuse
12-year-old girl raises money for Prevent Child Abuse Utah

Support high school singers

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Students can handle LGBT question that schools are afraid to ask

NATION

New Law Nixing Broadband Privacy Protections Stirs K-12 Fears

Mayor Hancock tells ICE: Back off arrests in courthouses and near schools
Fear paralyzing Denver’s sizable immigrant population, Mayor Hancock tells ICE in letter

Undocumented Parents Face Imperfect Options For Kids

Transgender Student Gavin Grimm: ‘This Case Is Bigger Than Me’

States Want More Career and Technical Training, But Struggle to Find Teachers

The cost of Betsy DeVos’s security detail: $1 million per month

San Diego Unified has a plan to fight Islamophobia and bullying

New Mexico Outlaws School ‘Lunch Shaming’

Common Core, Smarter Balanced nixed as Justice’s K-12 bill advances

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey Signs Voucher Bill

States All Over the Map on Setting Computer Science Policy

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Midcareer teachers feel overlooked in proposed Jordan School District salary plan
Jordan School District » Reforms would pump $10 million into pay, but distribution questioned.

Teachers in Jordan School District got their first look this week at a proposed overhaul of educator pay, and not everyone is pleased.
The Jordan teachers’ union is currently shopping the salary reform package to its members, in anticipation of a vote by the district school board later this month. The plan would pump nearly $10 million of new cash into teacher compensation.
But informational meetings have reportedly generated pushback from rank-and-file educators, who worry that the focus on entry-level and veteran faculty comes at the expense of midcareer employees.
“Those of us who already have a master’s degree and multiple years of experience are taking a hit,” said Steve Haslam, an English teacher at Copper Hills High School. “It benefits us all in the short-term; but long-term, not so much.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CB (SLT)

 

Will SITLA Play ‘Hardball’ With Moab Development?

It’s called SITLA, which stands for the cumbersome bureaucratic title, “School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration.” SITLA’s sole mission is to maximize profits from state-owned lands for the benefit of Utah’s K-12 schools. In Moab, that means creating a large new resort complex, dubbed “Lion’s Back,” in the heart of the Sand Flats Recreation District. Stalled by a decade of debate and lawsuits, Lion’s Back is facing new lawsuits filed this week by local environmental groups, who are saying the local water supply would be threatened.
The situation was aggravated at a recent meeting where SITLA officials suggested that state grant money be withheld from Moab unless the town agrees to support all SITLA projects in the area. This drew a sharp response from state senator Jim Dabakis.
“When state government money, when that is dependant on the local community accepting exactly the kind of exploitation of the land that the state wants, I think that’s not just intimidation, it is a total disregard of the local people.”
The board has declined for now to withhold funds from Moab, but Dabakis still takes exception to SITLA’s single-minded mission.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9D0 (UPR)

 

How a computer program designed for home-based preschool in Utah could get a piece of Indiana’s education budget

Indiana lawmakers are moving ahead with a proposal that would spend several million dollars over the next two years expanding preschool. But $2 million of that wouldn’t be spent on classrooms, teacher salaries or picture books.
Instead, it would give parents access to software that claims to get kids ready for kindergarten in “just 15 minutes a day.”
The unusual proposal – which might not survive the contentious budget-writing process – is part of an ongoing debate about how to expand education for Indiana’s youngest students. Indiana already grants low-income families vouchers to use at preschools in five counties, including Marion County. But that program serves fewer than 1,600 kids, and demand far exceeds supply.
To help, Senate lawmakers are discussing how to add funding for both traditional preschool and an online program. But educators and preschool advocates say they aren’t convinced that any software will meet the needs of the poor children that Indiana says need preschool most.
“I can see how a good online program, guided by family in the home, can supplement high-quality pre-K, but it certainly is not a substitute,” said Ted Maple, president of Early Learning Indiana, a non-profit child care provider and advocacy organization. “A skilled preschool teacher would design activities that encourage children to work together, learn how to be part of a classroom community.”
Upstart, a software program developed by the Utah Department of Education and the nonprofit Waterford, is at the center of the proposal. The program’s website claims that Upstart “prepares children for kindergarten in just 15 minutes a day, 5 days a week.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9D1 (Chalkbeat)

 

Utah 2017 Legislative Session education bills increase budget, privacy protections

Utah legislators passed bills to increase the budget for public and higher education and improve student privacy and protection during the 2017 Legislative Session.
More Funding for Education
Legislators passed several bills that raised the education budget to $1.5 million for the 2017 fiscal year. Another set of bills set the budget for the 2018 fiscal year to $1.7 billion using resources from the Education Fund and General Fund.
Student Privacy
The Utah Student Privacy Act places more restrictions on who can have access to students’ records, which will protect students’ records from being shared with unauthorized persons.
Sex Education
SB196 repeals a bill that prohibited “the advocacy of homosexuality” in public sexual education classes.
Physical Restraint in Schools
HB92 prohibits educators or any school employees from physically restraining a student, even if the student is caught damaging school property.
The bill requires students to pay back any costs of damages. The only circumstances in which physical restraint would be appropriate and legal is if an employee were acting out of self-defense or preventing harm to the student or another individual.
The bill also eliminates the clause that had previously permitted corporal punishment of students if parents gave written permission to do so.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9D5 (BYU Universe)

 

North Logan family continues title run at state geography bee

Not wanting to be outdone by his older sister, Ankit Garg is now a back-to-back state champion in the Utah Geographic Bee.
The seventh-grader at Bear River Charter School continues the North Logan family’s winning ways after claiming the 2017 title last weekend at Thanksgiving Point.
“It is fun to win two years in a row. I had been planning to do it, but you never know,” Garg said. “At first I got one question wrong.
In the final round of the state bee, Garg went head-to-head with Shayan Pandit, a fifth-grader from the Waterford School in Sandy. The two were tied 1-1 going in the final question.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CN (LHJ)

 

Sexual orientation question remains off high school student survey after districts object

SALT LAKE CITY – A question about a high school student’s sexual orientation will not be included on a survey this year. With suicide rates among teens on the rise in Utah, health leaders wanted to gather information about a student’s sexual orientation, but they faced resistance from some school districts.
Every two years, Utah high school students are asked to fill out the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. The information gives the Utah Department of Health a gauge of health issues schools should address in the classroom.
This year, they wanted to add a question about a student’s sexual orientation. The survey is confidential, needs parental consent, and participants are allowed to skip any questions.
“It’s a very simple question that simply asks, ‘How would you describe yourself? Heterosexual, gay, bisexual, don’t know, refused’,” said Michael Friedrichs, an epidemiologist with the Utah Department of Health.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CS (KSTU)

 

‘Passing the trash’: 2 women say the teachers who sexually abused them were allowed to continue teaching

Chelsea Burkett was a 16-year-old student when one of her teachers targeted her for sexual abuse.
“He first kissed me in this park in L.A.,” Chelsea told “Nightline.” “It was scary and it felt weird and gross. And, once he started abusing me it was just like accelerated very very quickly.”
The perpetrator was Joseph Koetters, a longtime English teacher at Marlborough, a prestigious all-girls school in Los Angeles.
For Chelsea, now 32, what started as mental manipulation eventually crossed all lines “When I got pregnant, this part of me that I thought I was, this like woman who is sophisticated and like worldly and wise just fell apart,” she said. “So I continue to go through the motions but I was just kind of like dead inside.”

Ten years ago, Nallely Hernandez, now 19, was in teacher Gary Gregor’s fourth grade class at Fairview Elementary School in Española, New Mexico. Nallely says Gregor showered her and her friends with gifts.
“I remember getting a white T-shirt with purple flowers on it and it said my name on it,” she said.

It turns out the alleged misconduct by Gregor was happening to Nallely and her friends after there had already been reports of a pattern of similar alleged improper conduct against Gregor during the years prior. Allegations of improper misconduct followed Gregor for years across two school districts, from state to state, classroom to classroom.
Long before Nallely, Gary Gregor taught fifth grade in Utah, in 1995, the state charging him with sexual abuse of a child. A district judge dismissed the charges citing insufficient proof, but the state board of education issued Gregor a reprimand. He was then hired as a teacher in two other schools in Montana and New Mexico, before becoming a fourth grade teacher in Santa Fe.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9D2 (ABC Nightline)

 

Utah teen ‘disappointed’ that victims didn’t die in November locker-room attack, assistant principal recalls
School stabbings » Four guilty pleas entered in juvenile, one in adult court.

After Luke Dollahite went on a bloody locker-room rampage that left five of his classmates seriously injured, the 16-year-old boy had a question for the paramedic that was bandaging a self-inflicted knife wound on the teen’s neck.
The teen wanted to know if he had killed any of the boys he had attacked, the assistant principal at Mountain View High School recalled in a statement submitted to a judge. Charles DeWitt wrote that the paramedic answered with a simple, “No.”
“I will never forget Luke’s reaction when the officer answered him,” DeWitt wrote. “He put his head down, as if he were disappointed, and said, ‘This wasn’t supposed to end this way.’ ”
In DeWitt’s emotional statement, he recalled how Nov. 15 started as a seemingly normal day that quickly escalated into confusion and chaos after Dollahite began his attack in the boys’ locker room. DeWitt remembered one student coming to him, covered in blood. As they heard Dollahite scream out after being stunned with a Taser by a school resource officer, the injured boy looked up at him and asked if he was going to die.
“It was all I could do to maintain my emotions and to reassure him that he would in fact live,” the administrator wrote, “and that help was on the way.”
The five injured students, as well as Dollahite, did survive. And Dollahite on Tuesday admitted in juvenile court to the attacks, pleading guilty to four counts of attempted aggravated murder.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CK (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9CM (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9CL (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9CO (AP via KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9CQ (DN via KSL)

 

Elementary school in Taylorsville shelters-in-place as police search for sexual assault suspect

TAYLORSVILLE, Utah, – An elementary school in Taylorsville is on a precautionary shelter-in-place protocol Friday morning as police search for an alleged sexual assault suspect in the area.
Details are still emerging, but initial reports indicate the sexual assault was reported to officials at approximately 8 a.m., and took place in a locker room at Salt Lake Community College’s Taylorsville-Redwood campus, at 4600 South Redwood Road.
The alleged suspect left before officials got to the scene, and the Utah Highway Patrol is leading the search in the area of 4400 S. 2200 West, with assistance from the West Valley City and the Unified Police departments.
Granite School District tweeted at 9 a.m. that John C. Fremont Elementary, at 4249 S. Atherton Drive (1425 West), is on a shelter-in-place protocol as officials attempt to locate the suspect. An additional tweet added there is no direct threat to students and the protocol has been put in place as a precautionary measure.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9D6 (Gephardt Daily)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9D9 (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9D7 (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9D8 (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Da (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Db (SLT)

 

Utah teen named Air Force’s ‘Military Child of the Year’

LAYTON, Utah – Northridge High School Senior Jamal Braxton is a wanted man, and he’s smiling about it.
“It’s definitely bittersweet,” Braxton said.
Braxton has narrowed his college selection to Cornell, Trinity College, and the U.S. Air Force Academy, though many other suitors came calling.
But Thursday night, Braxton paid a visit to Washington D.C. where he was honored as the Military Child of the Year. The award is handed out by Operation Homefront, an organization which “builds strong, stable, and secure military families,” according to the organization’s webpage.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CR (KSTU)

 

The Gail S. Halvorsen Aviation Education Foundation plans new home in Spanish Fork

Gail S. Halvorsen, known internationally as the “Candy Bomber,” has dedicated his life to aviation education, to mentoring youth and responding to the emergency needs of those around him. Now, the foundation dedicated to his legacy – The Gail S. Halvorsen Aviation Education Foundation – continues his work.
The retired colonel lends his name and support to the Foundation, which is dedicated to advancing aviation education, promoting youth leadership development, enhancing community capacity for emergency response and encouraging humanitarian service on macro- and micro-levels.
As its initial project, the Foundation is raising money to construct an 8,000-square-foot multi-use facility at the Spanish Fork-Springville Airport. The facility will provide space to house STEM educational enrichment events for local schools and private youth groups, display memorabilia and artifacts that visually depict the Candy Bomber story, and provide meeting space for other like-minded organizations that support the Foundation’s education and humanitarian service missions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9D4 (Utah Valley 360)

 

6th grader holds penny drive to help against child abuse
12-year-old girl raises money for Prevent Child Abuse Utah

MAGNA, Utah — Some students are learning that a penny can make a big difference. A little girl in Magna got her entire school to donate through a penny drive for a good cause.
The 12-year-old girl from Entheos Academy, chose Prevent Child Abuse Utah, a local non-profit organization, that brings awareness to child abuse.
Faith Luna wasn’t satisfied by just sending a check in the mail, she wanted to do it in person. In turn, Prevent Child Abuse Utah wanted to go to her school and personally thank her.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CP (KTVX)

 

Support high school singers

Head out to “Real Men Sing” on Friday night, a special concert at Utah Valley University. The collaborative show will feature various ensemble men’s choirs from local high schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9D3 (PDH)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Students can handle LGBT question that schools are afraid to ask
Salt Lake Tribune editorial

It was only 17 days ago that we allowed our educators to say homosexuality is OK. That context may explain why some Utah school administrators balked at asking students about their sexual orientation on an anonymous survey.
But that’s an explanation, not a justification.
Both Davis and Cache School District officials said they would not distribute the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a joint effort of the Utah Department of Health and the federal Centers for Disease Control, if it included a question about the students’ sexual orientation. Rather than risk more defections from other schools would render the data useless, the health department eliminated the question.
In so doing, they passed up the chance to put some science to what is already known anecdotally: LGBT kids are at higher risk, including the risk of suicide. They also gave up the chance to apply data science to finding help for them.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CA

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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New Law Nixing Broadband Privacy Protections Stirs K-12 Fears
Education Week

This week President Trump signed into law a measure that critics say clears a path for internet service providers to share and sell customers’ web browsing histories and other personal data, a decision that has drawn scorn from many privacy and consumer advocates.
But what will the new law mean for school districts and students? Gauging the policy’s reach into K-12 requires some speculation, but a number of backers of privacy protections see reason to be worried.
The law has received scant scrutiny in education circles compared to the intense interest paid in recent years to worries about students’ potential loss of privacy to ed-tech vendors selling products in schools.
The legislation that Trump signed nixed rules approved by the Federal Communications Commission while President Obama was in office that set privacy restrictions on data the telecoms collect on customers.
Those rules had not yet taken effect. The new law, approved along partisan lines by the Republican majority in Congress, ensures they will not.
Schools and districts typically have their own contracts with internet service providers. So the information those companies can collect and sell to marketers and advertisers probably depends on the language of individual K-12 contracts, said Bill Fitzgerald, director of the education privacy initiative at Common Sense Media.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CV

 

Mayor Hancock tells ICE: Back off arrests in courthouses and near schools
Fear paralyzing Denver’s sizable immigrant population, Mayor Hancock tells ICE in letter
Denver Post

Denver’s top officials on Thursday sent a letter to the local federal immigration office warning that its officers’ actions are jeopardizing public safety by creating fear among immigrants when agents appear in courthouses and schools.
The letter specifically addresses U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents’ appearances at the Lindsey-Flanigan Courthouse to make arrests and a March 14 raid near Colorado High School Charter in west Denver where federal agents wore black uniforms identifying themselves as police as parents were dropping students off at school.
“Identifying yourselves as ‘police’ confuses and erodes the trust between our local police and the immigrant community endangering the community at large,” the letter said. “Again, Denver’s concerns in this regard are being increasingly expressed by city leaders and local law enforcement officials elsewhere in the United States.”
The letter was signed by Mayor Michael Hancock and all 13 members of Denver City Council, Denver Public Schools Superintendent Tom Boasberg, presiding Denver County Court Judge Theresa Spahn, District Attorney Beth McCann and City Attorney Kristin Bronson. It was addressed to Jeffrey D. Lynch, acting field officer director at the ICE office in Centennial. ICE officials could not be reached for comment Thursday.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CC

http://gousoe.uen.org/9CD (Chalkbeat)

 

Undocumented Parents Face Imperfect Options For Kids
(Chicago) WBEZ

Diana remembers the fear that grabbed her after a discussion she had with her mother, Eva, several weeks ago. They talked about what would happen if immigration agents came to their home and took Eva and her husband, who are undocumented immigrants. Eva told 15-year-old Diana to take her three younger siblings, who are all U.S. citizens, and live with their aunt.
“It got me really afraid thinking that – that it’s going to happen. It’s for sure going to happen,” said Diana, who requested we not use her or her mother’s real names. “And if it wasn’t going to happen, I was thinking in my mind, why is she doing this?”
Since Donald Trump won the presidential election, undocumented parents in Chicago and across the country have faced a question that no parent wants to consider: What will happen to their kids if they’re deported? Many parents have sought to designate a trusted friend or family member as the legal guardian of their children, but they have been uncertain of their options, many of which are imperfect, as Diana’s parents would discover.
Speaking in Spanish with the help of an interpreter, Eva said she began to think about creating a safety plan for her children when Trump entered the presidential race and campaigned with an aggressive deportation strategy. When Trump won, Eva said she began having sleepless nights, fearing that immigration agents could take her and her husband away from their children.
Eva and her husband visited a notary public to draw up an official letter stating that if they are unable to care for their kids, then her sister-in-law would assume full responsibility of the children. But Eva said she later began having doubts about the notarized letter.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CY

 

Transgender Student Gavin Grimm: ‘This Case Is Bigger Than Me’
Education Week

Virginia high school senior Gavin Grimm is now known nationwide as the plaintiff in a case over transgender student rights that made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.
Grimm, who transitioned from female-to-male his freshman year, sued the Gloucester County district after it created a policy that limited bathroom access by biological sex.
That case, which the Supreme Court sent back to a lower court earlier this year, won’t be decided until after Grimm graduates. But he’s embraced his new public role as an advocate, he told lawmakers at a congressional hearing Thursday.
“I stand not only with my family and friends but with millions of supporters who stand with me,” Grimm said at a panel on “civil rights in the Trump era” held by congressional Democrats. “My case will not be resolved until after I graduate, but this case is bigger than me.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CG

http://gousoe.uen.org/9CH (NBC)

 

States Want More Career and Technical Training, But Struggle to Find Teachers
Stateline

Many Minnesota employers say they can’t find skilled workers with the right career training. Meanwhile, high schools are cutting career and technical education courses because they can’t find qualified teachers.
“The jobs are there, and we’re not preparing our kids well enough to get into those jobs because the system has not allowed us to,” said Stephen Jones, the superintendent of schools in Little Falls, Minnesota. His district hasn’t had to cancel any courses for lack of instructors, but he says smaller districts in the state have.
Nationally, career and technical education (CTE) isn’t the area with the worst teacher shortage – that’s special education. But two-thirds of states are currently reporting a shortage of CTE teachers in at least one specialty, according to a Stateline analysis of federal data. Many states, such as Minnesota and South Dakota, have had a shortage of CTE teachers for a decade. Some states, such as Maine, Maryland and New York, have had a shortage for almost 20 years.
To address the problem, legislators in Minnesota and other states have pursued changes to teacher licensing that would make it easier for people who work in industry to transition into teaching, or to teach part-time.
But there are many other reasons for the shortage that are harder to tackle: Teacher salaries are too low to compete with salaries in technical fields. Too few young people are specializing in career and technical education in college. And it’s hard to attract teachers to isolated schools in rural areas.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CE

 

The cost of Betsy DeVos’s security detail: $1 million per month
Washington Post

Federal marshals are protecting Education Secretary Betsy DeVos at a cost to her agency of $1 million per month, according to the U.S. Marshals Service.
The Education Department has agreed to reimburse the marshals $7.78 million for their services from mid-February to the end of September of this year, according to a spokeswoman for the Marshals Service – an amount that works out to about $1 million per month. Marshals will continue providing security for the education secretary for the next four years, or until either agency decides to terminate the arrangement, under an agreement signed last week.
While the department is spending the additional money on DeVos’s security, members of the in-house security team that guarded previous secretaries remain on the payroll. But they are not guarding DeVos and have not been assigned new duties, according to a department employee who was not authorized to speak to a reporter and asked for anonymity.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CI

 

San Diego Unified has a plan to fight Islamophobia and bullying
Los Angeles Times

San Diego Unified School District administrators and teachers will have calendars showing Islamic holidays, students will learn more about the religion in social studies classes and safe places will be created on campuses for Muslim students as part of a multi-tiered approach to combat Islamophobia.
Stan Anjan, the district’s executive director of family and community engagement, said elements of the plan approved this week will be laid out before the end of the school year – with a goal of having it in place at the start of the fall semester.
“It’s more of a comprehensive program, not just a curriculum,” he said. “We’re looking at it from a very integrated and holistic approach.”
The plan also calls for a different approach in disciplining students who bully Muslim students. Rather than detention, the school will use a restorative-justice method involving the student who did the bullying speaking with the other student.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CJ

 

New Mexico Outlaws School ‘Lunch Shaming’
New York Times

What is “lunch shaming?” It happens when a child can’t pay a school lunch bill.
In Alabama, a child short on funds was stamped on the arm with “I Need Lunch Money.” In some schools, children are forced to clean cafeteria tables in front of their peers to pay the debt. Other schools require cafeteria workers to take a child’s hot food and throw it in the trash if he doesn’t have the money to pay for it.
In what its supporters say is the first such legislation in the country, New Mexico has outlawed shaming children whose parents are behind on school lunch payments.
On Thursday, Gov. Susana Martinez signed the Hunger­Free Students’ Bill of Rights, which directs schools to work with parents to pay their debts or sign up for federal meal assistance and puts an end to practices meant to embarrass children.
The law’s passage is a victory for anti­hunger activists, who have long been critical of lunch­shaming practices that single out children with insufficient funds on their electronic swipe cards or who lack the necessary cash. These practices can include making the child wear a wrist band or requiring the child to perform chores in exchange for a meal.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CZ

 

Common Core, Smarter Balanced nixed as Justice’s K-12 bill advances
Charleston (WV) Gazette-Mail

The Senate Education Committee on Thursday passed a version of the governor’s education bill that would now also ban Common Core standards and the current Smarter Balanced standardized tests. It could be amended on the Senate floor today.
Gov. Jim Justice’s bill (House Bill 2711), which already would eliminate the state Office of Education Performance Audits, now raises even more questions about how West Virginia will hold public schools and school systems accountable.
The bill also would eliminate the eight Regional Education Services Agencies (RESAs) and the mandate that public school year calendars have at least 180 separate instructional days.
The state Board of Education has separately indicated it plans to ditch Smarter Balanced but hasn’t moved to choose a replacement. Federal law requires states have standardized testing.
The Senate Education amendment added to the bill would prevent the board from backtracking. Six of the nine board members were appointed by Justice.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CF

 

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey Signs Voucher Bill
Associated Press

PHOENIX — Republican Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey has signed a major school voucher expansion bill that will extend eligibility to all 1.1 million state schoolchildren despite vehement opposition from Democrats who believe it will undercut public education and cost taxpayers untold millions of dollars.
“When parents have more choices, kids win,” Ducey tweeted after the House and Senate barely passed the legislation Thursday evening.
Republican backers call the measure a needed school choice expansion, but opponents argued it will benefit the wealthy, who they say will use state money to pay for private education they would fund anyway.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CT

http://gousoe.uen.org/9CU ([Phoenix] Arizona Republic)

 

States All Over the Map on Setting Computer Science Policy
Education Week

One of President Barack Obama’s pet education initiatives was Computer Science for All: The federal government dedicated $4 billion to help states develop their computer science programs, arguing that working with technology is an essential skill.
But with funds for federal education programs in question, future leadership in computer science education will likely come from states. And right now, there are major differences in how states have approached strategy, standards, and other state-level computer science education initiatives. For instance, seven states now have standards for computer science education and 22 have teacher licensure standards for the subject. Those aren’t the same states as those that require high schools to offer computer science, or those that have created a state computer science position.
That’s according to a new report from the Massachusetts Computing Attainment Network, or MassCAN, an initiative of the Education Development Center, and a number of partner organizations. It takes stock of the current state of computer science education-related policies in states across the country and recommends that states create plans for increasing access to this fast-growing field.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CW

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9CX (Education Development Center)

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

April 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
2750 University Park Blvd., Layton
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

April 21:

Utah State Board of Education Law and Licensing Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

Utah State Board of Education Finance Committee meeting
1 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

April 26:

Utah State Board of Education Standards and Assessment Committee meeting
9:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 4:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

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