Education News Roundup: April 12, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Salt Lake School District hopes to take advantage of the end of an equalization funding measure.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EQ (SLT)

It will cost $2.5 million to demolish Granite High.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EZ (DN)

Duchesne School District Adult Education Director Danny Drew may challenge Sen. Hatch.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EO (UP)

Study find merit pay may work.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EU (Ed Week)
or a copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EV (Vanderbilt University)

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Salt Lake City schools hope to retain $8M in property taxes after equalization ‘quirk’ ends
Funding > Pending school board action, patrons in districts such as Canyons may see property taxes rise.

Demolition of Granite High School a $2.5 million project

Utah School District Looks to Fill 200 Teaching Vacancies
A Utah school district is looking out of state to fill hundreds of teaching positions as schools across the state struggle with teacher recruitment and retention.

Bringing books to life: How illustrations help tell a story and engage children

Another Democrat looking to knock off Hatch in 2018

Apparent suicide victim found, Kaysville schools put in ‘lock out’ mode

Refugee youth employment boot camp set for Saturday

Community rallies around music teacher with cancer

Utah Girl Who Suddenly Lost Her Hair to Alopecia Wins Her School’s ‘Crazy Hair Day’ Contest with Style: ‘Now I Love Being Bald’

Easter Basket Auction ‘champions’ Provo School District’s after-school programs

Students celebrate Holy Week by re-enacting Stations of the Cross

Can you dig it? Kindergartners learn about gardening

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Carrie Dunn

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Kaiden Ewell

Schools in Box Elder County

OPINION & COMMENTARY

It’s time for Utah, U.S. to address teacher shortages

Vaccinations work when everyone gets them

The Anti-School Choice Coalition
Democrats in Maryland and the GOP in Texas punish poor kids.

Why the Supreme Court should not force the public to pay for religious schools

NATION

After a school shooting, advice on how to help children cope

Boy Killed in Classroom Was ‘Happy Child’ with Rare Disorder

Teachers to Ducey: You Played Us on Education Funding
Republican Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey is defending his decision to sign a massive expansion of the state’s private school voucher program.

Merit Pay for Teachers Can Lead to Higher Test Scores for Students, a Study Finds

Teacher Prep Slow to Embrace Social-Emotional Learning

Study: Music Education in K-12 Promotes Lifelong Engagement With Arts

Trump Taps Lawyer Involved with Trump U Case for Federal Job

More Than 1,450 Groups Ask Congress to Keep Federal Funding for After-School

Value, Number of Education Deals Plummets Over Most Recent Year

How School Start Times Affect High-School Athletics
Catching more sleep could help student-athletes catch more touchdowns, but some still argue sports schedules are a reason against moving back the first bell.

How war and years of lost education have devastated Syrian children – and what can be done to help

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UTAH NEWS
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Salt Lake City schools hope to retain $8M in property taxes after equalization ‘quirk’ ends
Funding > Pending school board action, patrons in districts such as Canyons may see property taxes rise.

Property owners throughout Salt Lake County will face tax adjustments this year after a 7-year-old school equalization law expires.
In most cases, the changes will be negligible, such as the estimated 55-cent annual tax break that Granite School District administrators say average homeowners there will receive.
But in Canyons and Salt Lake City school districts, combined effects from the changes are putting millions of dollars at stake as the byzantine revenue-sharing system among districts is phased out and districts move to adjust.
Paradoxically, leaders in Salt Lake City School District will have to follow a state-required process for increasing taxes – public notices and hearings and the like – just to ask their residents to pay tax bills at existing levels.
Residents in Canyons, meanwhile, will pony up a combined total of $6.8 million in additional property taxes – with no action taken by their school board.
Those and other complex budget effects have school officials wondering if state lawmakers thought the whole thing through.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EQ (SLT)

 

Demolition of Granite High School a $2.5 million project

SOUTH SALT LAKE – Demolition of Granite High School, closed in 2009, is set to begin this summer now that the Granite Board of Education prepares to award a $2.5 million contract to raze the century-old campus.
Administrators recommended approval of $2.55 million to Staker Parson Co. for demolition of structures on the site, 500 E. 3305 South. The school board was expected to act on the award Tuesday evening.
“They’ll start asbestos mitigation immediately. We would not anticipate buildings coming down until August,” said Ben Horsley, director of communications and community outreach for the Granite School District.
The school district will work with the contractor to preserve memorabilia such as bricks and exterior features of buildings to be made available to the public at a later time.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EZ (DN)

 

Utah School District Looks to Fill 200 Teaching Vacancies
A Utah school district is looking out of state to fill hundreds of teaching positions as schools across the state struggle with teacher recruitment and retention.

SALT LAKE CITY – A Utah school district is looking out of state to fill hundreds of teaching positions as schools across the state struggle with teacher recruitment and retention.
Steve Dimond, human resources director for Canyons School District, has been attending job fairs across the country in search of candidates to fill 200 teaching jobs within the district, The Deseret News reported.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fa (AP via USN&WR)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fb (AP via LHJ)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fc (AP via KUTV)

 

Bringing books to life: How illustrations help tell a story and engage children

Think about your favorite picture book when you were a child. Did the illustrations help you imagine what the characters looked like in your head? What about the scenery? The action?
Illustrations are powerful ways of helping books come alive. There are several illustrators here in Utah County. Two of them, Guy Francis and Will Terry, have shared their thoughts about the illustration process, how illustrations enhance a child’s experience reading a book, and advice they have to future authors or illustrators.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9F7 (PDH)

Another Democrat looking to knock off Hatch in 2018

Another day, another Democrat entering the fray to unseat Sen. Orrin Hatch.
Danny Drew, who works in public education, says he’s bringing an entirely different perspective to next year’s race.
How so?
Drew is the Director of Adult Education for the Duchene County School District, which he says gives him a unique viewpoint.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EO (UP)

Apparent suicide victim found, Kaysville schools put in ‘lock out’ mode

An apparent suicide on the grounds outside of Kaysville Junior High School on Tuesday prompted “lock out” restrictions on the campus, as well as nearby Columbia Elementary School.
Kaysville police dispatchers confirmed that a man’s body reportedly was found around 8:15 a.m. on school property outside the buildings.
No other details – including by what means the man, in his 20s, died, or his identity – were immediately released.
Davis School District spokesman Chris Williams confirmed the two schools kept students and staff inside behind locked doors while police investigated. Inside the schools’ classes were being held as normal; the lock outs were lifted at noon.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EY (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9F5 (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fd (AP via KUTV)

Refugee youth employment boot camp set for Saturday

SOUTH SALT LAKE – The Granite School District will host a refugee youth employment boot camp Saturday, April 15, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Utah Refugee Education & Training Center, 250 W. 3900 South.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9F1 (DN)

 

Community rallies around music teacher with cancer

Creating Ripples tells the story of Kerry Moore’s impact on the local community. He has been a music teacher at Cyprus High School for decades. He has been fighting pancreatic cancer since his diagnosis in 2001. Mr. Moore is the focus of the documentary “Creating Ripples”. The title is meant to represent the fact that one person or one tiny moment can create a ripple effect and change life forever. A percentage of all money raised for the film will be given to the Moore family.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fe (KSTU)

 

Utah Girl Who Suddenly Lost Her Hair to Alopecia Wins Her School’s ‘Crazy Hair Day’ Contest with Style: ‘Now I Love Being Bald’

It was on New Year’s Day of this year that 7-year-old Gianessa Wride’s hair first started falling out in quarter-sized clumps as her mom brushed through her tangles in the morning.
Twenty days later, when her long, dark locks were completely gone, the Salem, Utah, first-grader and her family learned that she had the autoimmune disease alopecia and that her hair and eyebrows would likely never grow back.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fo (People)

 

Easter Basket Auction ‘champions’ Provo School District’s after-school programs

Early in his business career, a mentor warned Brent Brown that he would receive a lot of requests from charitable organizations asking for money. Realistically, Brown knew he couldn’t support all of the organizations that would contact him about donations, so he took this advice from his mentor: “Choose a category and then champion it.”
And now Brown has been championing the Easter Basket Auction for 14 years, an event he organized to help raise funds for the Provo School District after-school programs. Provo School District first approached Brown about donating to the after-school programs 14 years ago, but Brown saw an opportunity to do more.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fp (Utah Valley 360)

 

Students celebrate Holy Week by re-enacting Stations of the Cross

Ethan McKenzie, center, portrays Jesus, and Brock Gutierrez, left, and Aaron Kolff portray Roman guards as students at St. John the Baptist Middle and Elementary schools re-enact the Living Stations of the Cross for visitors to the Skaggs Catholic Center in Draper on Tuesday. For Roman Catholics throughout the world, the Stations of the Cross are synonymous with Lent, Holy Week and especially Good Friday. This devotion, also known as the “Way of the Cross,” the “Via Crucis” and the “Via Dolorosa,” commemorates 14 key events on the day of Christ’s crucifixion. The majority concern his final walk through the streets of Jerusalem while carrying the cross. The object of the stations is to help the Christian faithful make a spiritual pilgrimage through contemplation of the Passion of Christ. A series of 14 images commonly are arranged in numbered order along a path, and the faithful travel from image to image, in order, stopping at each station to say selected prayers and reflections.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9F0 (DN)

 

Can you dig it? Kindergartners learn about gardening

Kindergartners Taimana Moore and Taylor Augsan look at something they found in their soil while learning how to plant seeds as part of Tractor Supply’s “Dig It” school garden program at Odyssey Elementary School in Woods Cross on Tuesday. The elementary school was one of 11 schools in Utah to receive a $500 grant from Tractor Supply earlier this year to start or sustain a school garden.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9F2 (DN)

 

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Carrie Dunn

Carrie Dunn is a first-grade teacher at Park Elementary in Spanish Fork. She was chosen as the Daily Herald’s Educator of the Week
http://gousoe.uen.org/9F8 (PDH)

 

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Kaiden Ewell

Kaiden Ewell is a fifth grader at Park View Elementary in Payson. He was chosen as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley student of the Week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9F9 (PDH)

 

Schools in Box Elder County

Just as school bells have evolved over time from a brass bell rung by hand to a computerized tone from a speaker system, education from pioneer days to the present has progressed dramatically. An historical exhibition featuring photographs and artifacts titled “From A to Z – Schools in Box Elder County, Past and Present” will be on show at the Brigham City Museum April 1 through June 10. Admission is free.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9F6 (OSE)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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It’s time for Utah, U.S. to address teacher shortages
Deseret News editorial

Utah schools recruiting teachers ‘coast to coast’ in face of high turnover, retirements
Utah needs permanent solutions to solve its ongoing teacher shortage.
Such solutions may include: flexibility to provide greater pay for high performers or those who come from competitive fields; efforts to boost the professional prestige for educators; and greater freedom for teachers to be creative and passionate in their own classrooms without overly onerous regulations.
Deseret News reporting this week documents the scramble among school districts to fill hundreds, if not thousands, of open positions by recruiting teachers from beyond the Beehive State’s borders. Fully 56 percent of public school teachers who entered the profession in 2008 exited by 2015, according to data from the Utah Education Policy Center at the University of Utah.
And the problem is not unique to the Beehive State. In recent years, regional neighbors such as California and Arizona, among other states across the nation, have faced their own shortage challenges.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9F3

 

Vaccinations work when everyone gets them
Salt Lake Tribune editorial

While some children were hoping for a snow day in April, others actually did get a day off. But not for the weather. Last Friday school was closed at Murray’s American International School of Utah for whooping cough. The charter school had 30 students quarantined and hundreds of absences after an outbreak of whooping cough – or pertussis – spread through the school’s population.
But whooping cough has been largely contained through vaccination. And if there is one thing we know, it is that vaccination works.
Utah requires that entering kindergartners receive five doses of the pertussis vaccine, or four by the age of 4, as well as a plethora of other vital vaccinations. But Utah law allows parents to claim exemptions from vaccination requirements for medical, religious or personal reasons.
Yet despite the life-saving protections vaccinations offer, likely one of the greatest medical advancements after the washing of hands, people still continue to exempt their children from these protections.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EP

 

The Anti-School Choice Coalition
Democrats in Maryland and the GOP in Texas punish poor kids.
Wall Street Journal editorial

Teachers unions portray vouchers as a nefarious Republican scheme though support for-and opposition to-private school choice is often bipartisan. Witness how Democrats in Maryland and Republicans in Texas have stymied efforts to improve educational options for poor kids.
Last week Maryland’s Democratic General Assembly overrode GOP Gov. Larry Hogan’s veto of a bill that restricts his ability to enact school reforms. Under the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, states must develop plans to identify and rehabilitate low-performing public schools. In Maryland this job falls to the 12-member Board of Education appointed by the governor.
Democrats have passed legislation limiting objective measures of academic performance (e.g., student achievement, growth, graduation rates) to 65% of a school’s score. So schools in which the vast majority of kids fail state tests could still get a passing grade if, say, they score high on teacher satisfaction or attendance.
The legislation also prohibits the board from issuing letter grades to schools and converting failing ones to charters or appointing new management-interventions backed by the Obama Administration. Nor can the board offer vouchers to students who attend chronically low-performing schools. In other words, Democrats want to keep poor kids trapped in failing schools while concealing the evidence.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ER $

Why the Supreme Court should not force the public to pay for religious schools
Washington Post commentary by Diane Ravitch, author of “The Death and Life of the Great American School System”

Robert Natelson, a retired constitutional law professor who is allied with the ultraconservative Heartland Institute, writes in this opinion article that the Supreme Court may well strike down the state prohibitions on public funding of religious schools – known as “baby Blaine Amendments” – because of their origins in anti-Catholic bias. If this happened, it would pave the way for government to divert public funding to the vouchers for religious schools for which Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos advocates.
The original Blaine Amendment was proposed by U.S. House Speaker James G. Blaine in 1875. Blaine was an ambitious politician from Maine who ran for president in 1876, 1880, and 1884. He was interested in a wide range of issues, including trade, monetary policy, and foreign affairs. He is remembered today for the constitutional amendment he proposed, which passed the House but not the Senate:
“No State shall make any law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; and no money raised by taxation in any State for the support of public schools, or derived from any public fund therefor, nor any public lands devoted thereto, shall ever be under the control of any religious sect; nor shall any money so raised or lands so devoted be divided between religious sects or denominations.”
Although the Blaine Amendment was not adopted as an amendment to the U.S. Constitution, it was adopted by many states and incorporated into their state constitutions to prohibit spending public money on religious schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fq

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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After a school shooting, advice on how to help children cope
Los Angeles Times

North Park Elementary School in San Bernardino was closed on Tuesday, the day after a man walked into a special education classroom and killed his wife, an 8-year-old student and then himself.
In the meantime, the children in that classroom and school and in surrounding schools – as well as their parents and teachers – have to cope with what they experienced Monday.
Counselors will be available for North Park students, parents and staff Tuesday and Wednesday at Del Vallejo Middle School, said Maria Garcia, spokeswoman for the San Bernardino City Unified School District.
“We’re going to make sure that they have counseling available as well as referrals to local agencies that might be able to assist,” she said.
The district’s superintendent, Dale Marsden, also asked parents to try to return to regular routines.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ES

 

Boy Killed in Classroom Was ‘Happy Child’ with Rare Disorder
Associated Press

SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. — An 8-year-old boy shot and killed along with his teacher in a San Bernardino special-education classroom was born with a genetic condition and had survived heart surgery, a school official said.
Jonathan Martinez had Williams syndrome, a rare disorder characterized by learning delays, mild-to-moderate intellectual disabilities and heart problems, according to Dale Marsden, superintendent of the San Bernardino City Unified School District.
But affected children also have “extraordinary gifts,” including a passion for music and extremely friendly personalities, an expert said.
“By all accounts, Jonathan Martinez was a happy child,” Marsden said Tuesday at a news conference.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ff

 

Teachers to Ducey: You Played Us on Education Funding
Republican Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey is defending his decision to sign a massive expansion of the state’s private school voucher program.
Associated Press via U.S. News & World Report

PHOENIX- Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey on Tuesday defended his decision to sign a massive expansion of the state’s private school voucher program, saying the state can invest more money into public K-12 education while adding reforms like the voucher program.
The throaty defense of the legislation signed by the Republican governor last week came a day after he met with six state teachers of the year. One said after the meeting that the governor had “played” them about his public education goals during last year’s campaign to pass a school funding initiative known as Proposition 123. The voter-approved measure tapped the state trust land fund for an extra $3.5 billion over 10 years for K-12 schools.
A letter the teachers gave Ducey talked about a statewide teacher shortage and said “funneling public money into private hands with a total lack of oversight will only exacerbate that crisis.”
“It’s hard not to feel betrayed when we went out and stumped for 123,” Beth Maloney, the state’s 2014 teacher of the year, told KPNX-TV Monday. “People voted for 123 because we said it was a good idea, it was something that we could back. And now there is a very real sense that we got played. I think the taxpayers of Arizona just got played.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ET

 

Merit Pay for Teachers Can Lead to Higher Test Scores for Students, a Study Finds
Education Week

Teacher participation in a merit-pay program led to the equivalent of four extra weeks of student learning, according to a new analysis of 44 studies of incentive-pay initiatives in the United States and abroad.
The U.S. merit-pay studies on their own showed increased student learning equivalent to three additional weeks of schooling.
“The findings suggest that merit pay is having a pretty significant impact on student learning,” said study author Matthew G. Springer, an assistant professor of public policy and education at Vanderbilt University. “Now we need more research to figure out what an optimal merit-pay program looks like and how it is designed.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EU

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EV (Vanderbilt University)

 

Teacher Prep Slow to Embrace Social-Emotional Learning
Education Week

As social-emotional learning gains traction in schools, many teachers are coming into their jobs unprepared to develop students’ skills in areas like self-awareness and navigating relationships, advocates say.
That’s because many teacher-preparation programs don’t provide enough training on how to identify the skills students need to be successful, and how to teach those skills, they say. Some states have also been slow to adapt teacher-licensing requirements to the reality that a growing numbers of schools and districts are exploring or implementing social-emotional learning.
Developing students’ abilities in understanding their emotions and making responsible decisions is accomplished through a combination of direct instruction, incorporating those skills into academic work, and changes to whole-school factors like discipline policies and family engagement.
“It’s important for teachers to learn how to specifically identify social and emotional competencies that are important for their students to have and to learn how to systematically develop them,” said Roger Weissberg, the chief knowledge officer of the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, or CASEL. “This does not necessarily come naturally to people.”
While a majority of states include at least some social-emotional-learning competencies and whole-school factors in teacher-certification requirements, very few teacher-prep programs address such issues in mandatory coursework, according to a report by researchers at the University of British Columbia that was prepared for the collaborative.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fi

 

Study: Music Education in K-12 Promotes Lifelong Engagement With Arts
Education Week

A new study from the University of Maryland indicates that adults who participated in music education in school in grades K-12 were more likely to attend a musical performance and play an instrument in later life. Education in other artistic disciplines, including theater, was also associated with participation in those disciplines later on in life.
Using information from the National Endowment for the Arts’ Survey of Public Participation in the Arts, Kenneth Elpus, an assistant professor of music education and the author of the study, examined how adults who reported studying a given art form in school engage with the arts as adults.
While other researchers have noted that participation in arts education is tied to being active in the arts as an adult, Elpus focused in on who had studied specific disciplines and on just how adults are involved with art later in life.
The findings may seem obvious-Theater kids turn into theater adults! Those who study music when they are young participate when they’re older! But Elpus writes that there are good reasons to look at how arts education affects behavior later in life.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fj

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fk (Psychology of Music) $

 

Trump Taps Lawyer Involved with Trump U Case for Federal Job
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — As a top aide to Florida’s attorney general, Carlos G. Muniz helped defend the office’s decision to sit out legal action against Trump University. Now the president is naming him to be the top lawyer in the U.S. Education Department.
President Donald Trump has announced his intent to nominate Muniz to serve as general counsel to Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. The Senate would then consider the nomination of the Republican lawyer.
Emails reviewed by The Associated Press show that in 2013 Muniz, who served as Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi’s chief of staff for three years, was included in discussions about student complaints alleging fraud with Trump’s namesake real-estate seminars.
Muniz, now in private practice, has also been the lead attorney defending Florida State University in a lawsuit by a former student who said the school failed to investigate after she said she was sexually assaulted by the star quarterback of the Seminoles’ 2013 national championship football team. The player was never charged with a crime by police in Tallahassee, and the state attorney’s office declined to pursue a criminal case against him.
An investigation by the Education Department’s Office of Civil Rights is still underway, presenting a potential conflict of interest if Muniz is confirmed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fg

 

More Than 1,450 Groups Ask Congress to Keep Federal Funding for After-School
Education Week

More than 1,450 organizations have signed a letter to members of Congress on a key appropriations subcommittee asking that they reject President Trump’s plan to cut federal support for after-school programs.
In the letter, the signers request that $1.167 billion be provided for 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC), which is the program’s current level of funding. These learning centers provide after-school and summer programs for students in low-income communities. President Trump’s proposed budget would eliminate the program.
The Afterschool Alliance, one of the organizations that signed the letter, released it to the public Monday.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EW

A copy of the letter
http://gousoe.uen.org/9EX (Afterschool Alliance)

 

Value, Number of Education Deals Plummets Over Most Recent Year
Education Week

The number of mergers and acquisitions in the education industry fell over the most recent year, and the total value of transactions plummeted, in an overall cooling of dealmaking in the sector, a new report shows.
There were 379 total transactions in the education market in 2016, an 11 percent drop from 426 the year before, according to the report from Berkery Noyes, an independent investment bank. The bank provides consulting on mergers and acquisitions and financial consulting.
Meanwhile, the total value of transactions dropped sharply, from $17.75 billion to $5.32 billion, Berkery Noyes officials said. That decline was partly due to a falling off in the number of mega-deals. In 2016, there were just seven deals with disclosed values at above $100 million, compared with 19 deals of that magnitude in 2015.
Some of the drop-off in dealmaking in the most recent year was a result of a heating up of transactions the year before.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fh

 

How School Start Times Affect High-School Athletics
Catching more sleep could help student-athletes catch more touchdowns, but some still argue sports schedules are a reason against moving back the first bell.
Atlantic

On March 13, the board of education in Sag Harbor, New York, a wealthy town on the eastern end of Long Island, sat down to discuss what time local schools should start. The principal question in front of the board was simple: Should Pierson Middle-High School, which is located in Suffolk County, New York, maintain its 7:35 a.m. start time or push back the opening bell to allow students more sleep in the morning?
Later start times have long been a pet cause for the board member Susan Lamontagne, a health advocate and Sag Harbor parent. In 2013, Lamontagne founded the Long Island chapter of Start School Later, a national organization that lobbies school districts to alter their schedules. A year later, she led a successful effort to push back start times at Pierson by 10 minutes. Unsatisfied with that modest change, she ran for the board in 2016 promising even later bells.
Now she was again bringing the cause to Sag Harbor, and this meeting was the first step toward change. She knew there would be resistance-there always was-but she hoped Sag Harbor residents could get on board with an 8 a.m. start time. That was earlier than the pediatrician-recommended 8:30 a.m., but at least it was later than 7:35 a.m.
But when it came time for public input, Don O’Brien made it clear that resistance to a 25-minute delay would be hard to overcome.
“You are putting our student-athletes at a disadvantage by having them get out at 3 o’clock,” O’Brien, a father of two Sag Harbor elementary-school students and a varsity soccer coach in a nearby town, told the board. “Every single contest that we play next year will be affected by a 3 o’clock time. Every practice and every single game.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fl

 

How war and years of lost education have devastated Syrian children – and what can be done to help
NewsHour

More than a third of schools in Syria have closed since the war began six years ago; a recent report found more than 1.7 million children and youth are not attending classes. David Miliband of the International Rescue Committee joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the devastating effects of trauma and the long-term consequences of a generation of children missing out on quality education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Fm

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

April 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
1:30 p.m., 2750 University Park Blvd., Layton
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

April 21:

Utah State Board of Education Law and Licensing Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

Utah State Board of Education Finance Committee meeting
1 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

April 26:

Utah State Board of Education Standards and Assessment Committee meeting
9:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 4:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

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