Education News Roundup: April 18, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

A Utah 6th District Court judge rules that SITLA lands are not subject to local zoning regulations.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HJ (SLT)

Ogden still considering what action to take for undocumented students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HN (OSE)

Ed Week takes a look at the new school choice law in Arizona.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HX (Ed Week)

Will education become a wedge issue in the 2018 elections?
http://gousoe.uen.org/9I4 (Politico)

Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine says teens shouldn’t start school before 8:30 a.m.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HU (USAT)
or a copy of the statement
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HV (Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine) $

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Project on state trust lands not subject to local zoning, court rules
Decision raises questions about how involved local authorities can be in school-trust projects.

Ogden school officials eye change to ease undocumented students’ jitters

Teacher Salaries On The Rise With A District Domino Effect In Salt Lake Co.

Dixie State Hope Squad helps students to help students

$30,000 awarded at High School Utah Entrepreneur Challenge

Lock down lifted at Fairview Elementary; parents to pick up students at the school

Groundbreaking for Provo elementary school canceled for second time

This Utah dad had a hilarious response after his daughter had an ‘accident’ at school

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Don’t overlook Utah’s optional tax check-off opportunities

Cut the non-education costs in school budgets

A Path to Destruction
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’ budget cuts would harm vulnerable kids and families.

I’m glad I didn’t ‘redshirt’ my child

My Daughter Has Autism But Our Special-Ed System Isn’t What She Needs

NATION

Arizona Victory Emboldens School Choice Supporters
Critics play defense as program expands

Democrats link party rivals to DeVos as 2018 fights emerge
Teachers unions and others are attacking charter supporters in California, New York and New Jersey for doing the administration’s ‘dirty work.’

New Study: 3 Ways to Tell If a Charter School Will Struggle Before It Even Opens Its Doors

What’s Missing From Some State ESSA Plans?

Schools should start later to prevent accidents, depression, scientists say

They’d be their families’ 1st in college, and with AVID’s help they’ll likely make it

Study shows four day school week may be ineffective

U.S. cargo ship blasts off for space station with supplies, experiments

Pro-vegan group seeks to ban processed meat from southern California school cafeterias

Harvard Education Dean Runs Boston Marathon in Honor of 26 Teachers

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Project on state trust lands not subject to local zoning, court rules
Decision raises questions about how involved local authorities can be in school-trust projects.

A state judge has invalidated a conditional-use permit Wayne County officials issued for a gravel pit on state trust lands on the edge of Teasdale, raising new questions on how much say local governments have over projects authorized by the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration.
The county last year approved a gravel pit on part of a 120-acre SITLA parcel just upwind from Torrey, the artsy gateway to Capitol Reef National Park, in an area zoned for agriculture and low-density residential. The move outraged some residents, who took the dispute to court.
A group calling itself Friends of Red Rocks argued a gravel-mining pit in that location risked making a mockery of Wayne County’s zoning ordinance and would subject Torrey to dust driven off the pit by stiff westerly winds.
But 6th District Judge George Harmond ruled that state-owned land is exempt from county zoning rules, so Wayne County properly declined to “rezone” the parcel in question. At the same time, Harmond said in his ruling the conditional-use permit issued to Brown Brothers Construction to operate the pit is not valid – since such permits are premised on a zoning designation.
“The counties cannot regulate conditional uses with a nonexistent zone,” the judge wrote. The county’s permit “is, then, of no force or effect.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HJ (SLT)

 

Ogden school officials eye change to ease undocumented students’ jitters

OGDEN – Ogden School District officials are leaning toward implementing a new policy meant to ease undocumented students’ worries about possible action by federal immigration officials in schools.
But if they do act, the change may not go into effect until the 2017-2018 school year.
Latino and immigrant advocates here, spurred by tough talk on dealing with undocumented immigrants from President Donald Trump’s administration, asked school officials last month to consider a policy restricting action by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials in schools. The Ogden School Board has yet to formally act, but school spokesman Jer Bates said the idea is getting serious consideration.
“We are taking this request very seriously and want to get it right,” Bates said in an email.
The school’s outside legal adviser is looking into the issue, he said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HN (OSE)

 

Teacher Salaries On The Rise With A District Domino Effect In Salt Lake Co.

Granite School District has announced an 11.67 percent salary raise for all teachers beginning next school year, making their beginning teacher salary the highest in Salt Lake County.
It’s like a domino effect. First, Jordan district announced a new salary schedule which bumped first year teacher salaries from 33 to $40,000 dollars. Then Canyons District just to the east proposed a similar plan. And now their neighbor to the north, Granite, will be paying new teachers $41,000.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HS (KUER)

 

Dixie State Hope Squad helps students to help students

ST. GEORGE, Utah – A new program at Dixie State University is a first of its kind – students helping students who struggle with mental illness. It’s called “Hope Squad”. They’ve been seen in high schools throughout Utah, but Dixie State University is bringing Hope Squad to a university campus.
Students at Dixie State’s Health and Counseling Center learn how to help their fellow students through depression and suicidal thoughts. It seems like a heavy burden for young adults to carry, but the students are hand-picked by their peers and say they’re ready for the responsibility.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HR (KTVX)

$30,000 awarded at High School Utah Entrepreneur Challenge

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah’s top high school entrepreneurs won $30,000 in cash and prizes at the 2017 High School Utah Entrepreneur Challenge at the University of Utah’s Lassonde Studios.
The competition, managed by the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute, a division of the David Eccles School of Business and sponsored by Zions Bank, received nearly 150 business idea submissions from high school students throughout the state. The top 24 teams advanced to the final round, where they got the chance to pitch their ideas to judges, made up of community leaders.
The teams’ ideas and business presentations ranged from a portable solar panel to affordable homes for the homeless.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HM (DN)

 

Lock down lifted at Fairview Elementary; parents to pick up students at the school

A suspect is in custody in Fairview following an incident this morning, and Fairview Elementary is no longer on lock down. However, because of the increased number of vehicles in the area of the incident, the district is asking parents to pick up their children at the school if they don’t ride the bus. Here is the information from the North Sanpete School District:
Due to law enforcement activity in Fairview today, Fairview Elementary walking students and North Sanpete Middle School students living in the Fairview walk zone will be released only to parents (or other adults on the student’s emergency release list). Fairview Elementary students that ride the bus will ride home as usual. Fairview Elementary walking students will remain at the school until parents (or another adult on the emergency release list) comes to the school to pick them up.
North Sanpete Middle School students living in Fairview City will be transported to Fairview. Parents (or other adults on the student’s emergency pick-up list) can meet the students at their regular bus stop to pick up their student when the bus arrives. The bus will meet parents at the museum if their students usually get off of the bus at either 1st East and 2nd North, or at 4th East and 2nd North. Any middle school students not met at the bus stop will be delivered to Fairview Elementary to wait for their parents.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HT (MUR)

 

Groundbreaking for Provo elementary school canceled for second time

A groundbreaking scheduled for a rebuild of a Provo elementary school has been canceled for the second time due to weather. It will not be rescheduled.
The groundbreaking for the new Provost Elementary School was scheduled for 10 a.m. Wednesday. It has been canceled due to anticipated rain.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HP (PDH)

 

This Utah dad had a hilarious response after his daughter had an ‘accident’ at school

Utah dad Ben Sowards just made his 6-year-old daughter’s sorrows disappear.
As BuzzFeed News reported, Sowards’ daughter, Valerie, had an accident at school last Friday. Sowards’ wife, Connie, called him to tell him about it, saying that their daughter was so embarrassed she wanted to go home.
“My heart kind of just broke,” Sowards told BuzzFeed News.
But Sowards made a move that cheered his daughter right up. He splashed some water on himself to make it look like he had an accident, too. When he went into the school’s office to pick up his daughter, he asked her for her backpack to cover his own “accident.”
His daughter, of course, laughed about it.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HL (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9HQ (SGS)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Don’t overlook Utah’s optional tax check-off opportunities
Salt Lake Tribune editorial

“I like to pay taxes. With them, I buy civilization.”
– Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.
But even the most public-spirited of us may want to choose which parts of civilization we pay for.
Those of you waiting until the last minute to file your 2016 income tax forms – due at midnight Tuesday – may be in too much of a rush to notice or, depending on what the rest of the form looks like, may not be in a giving mood. But, like many other states, Utah offers its taxpayers a chance to direct some money for one or more of a handful of good causes, from education to homelessness to buying body armor for police dogs.
It’s worth a serious look. Especially if you are due a refund of any size, agreeing to hand some of that money back to particular uses might help some taxpayers feel as though they have done something more for the common good.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HI

 

Cut the non-education costs in school budgets
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Ron R. Smith

In announcing pay raises for teachers in Granite School District, spokesman Ben Horsley said, “We want Granite to become the destination and school district of choice.”
What a refreshing idea in a state where underfunding public education has become the Legislature’s annually relied-upon trick for balancing the state’s budget at the expense of teacher recruitment and retention. What a novel approach to having at least some chance of putting proven-effective teachers in every classroom instead of encouraging them to leave for classrooms in other states actually willing to pay for top-drawer talent. What an opportunity to start something important going in Utah toward changing the family-friendly state’s perennial ignominy – last in per-pupil funding and most students per teacher.
Enough euphoria. Not all districts can raise property taxes higher than they already are. What they can do and, in my estimation, should be encouraged to do is cut costs not directly related to K-12 education. Better utilization of facilities through scheduling is a big one. Elimination of intramural athletics and related buildings/grounds is another. Grounds and facilities upkeep/maintenance by volunteers is almost a no-brainer, as is reduction in administrative costs at individual school and district levels.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HK

 

A Path to Destruction
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’ budget cuts would harm vulnerable kids and families.
U.S. News & World Report op-ed by Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos spent two decades defunding and destabilizing public schools in Michigan, and now she wants to spread that same agenda to every town and city in America. How else do you explain the cruel and craven cuts she and President Donald Trump have proposed to funding for after-school and summer programs, child nutrition programs, class-size reduction, community schools and the supports kids need and parents rely on? How else can you rationalize the White House budget director claiming that there’s no evidence that feeding hungry children helps them do better in school? These are programs essential to meeting the social, emotional and academic needs of children. We can’t go back and undo what DeVos did in Michigan, but we can and must stand up and stop her from pushing this anti-public school agenda across the country.
Public schools enable opportunity and a pathway to success for kids, but these cuts drive a stake through the heart of public education and destroy the promise and potential it offers our children.
By eliminating after-school and summer programs, Trump and DeVos are telling working parents: Either work and leave your young children unsupervised for several hours a day, or stay home with them and lose the job you need to pay the rent and grocery bills. For many children with tough situations at home, school may be the only safe sanctuary they can count on, or the only place they reliably receive a meal each day; this budget would rob them of that safety and security. These cuts would leave kids hungry and unsupervised, and force them into potentially dangerous situations.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9I7

 

I’m glad I didn’t ‘redshirt’ my child
Washington Post commentary by columnist Esther J. Cepeda

CHICAGO — There are a few precious moments in every parent’s life when you realize you didn’t inadvertently torpedo your kid’s chances at success and happiness. Last week, I had one.
My vindication came courtesy of a new paper to be published in the Summer 2017 issue of Education Next, a policy research journal. The paper focuses on all the reasons that “academic redshirting” — delaying a child’s entry into kindergarten in order to derive benefit from an extra year of physical growth and social-emotional maturity — can potentially do more harm than good.
“Redshirting is generally not worth it,” write authors Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, a professor of education and social policy at Northwestern University, and Stephanie Howard Larson, the director of a Montessori school in Wilmette, Illinois.
In fact, they write, “the benefit of being older at the start of kindergarten declines sharply as children move through the school grades.” And, notably, “For the older students [who were redshirted] … the positive impacts of being more mature are offset by the negative effects of attending class with younger students.”
This was music to my ears.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HO

 

My Daughter Has Autism But Our Special-Ed System Isn’t What She Needs
Time op-ed by Katherine Osnos Sanford, a public school teacher in Northern California

Mae has a red backpack that I ordered shortly before she started school. Her two brothers have similar backpacks, also in bright colors, each embroidered with their initials. I love the sight of my children’s backpacks hanging together on the hooks by our back door. It makes me feel that things are in order.
What you can’t see when you look at their backpacks is how differently they experience school. My sons, who are in elementary and middle school, are on a largely regular trajectory. Mae, however, is autistic; she is almost completely nonverbal and, at the age of nine, still in diapers. Five years after Mae entered a classroom for the first time, school is a vital but incomplete experience.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9I8

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Arizona Victory Emboldens School Choice Supporters
Critics play defense as program expands
Education Week

School choice supporters already hope to broaden Arizona’s newly expanded education savings account program that allows any parent to seek public funds for private schools, even as teachers and school groups decry the most expansive such law in the country.
Gov. Doug Ducey, a Republican, signed the law April 6, opening up eligibility for the accounts, known as ESAs, to any of the state’s 1.1 million students. In a last-minute compromise, the law capped the number of students receiving the voucherlike funds, at about $4,400 per child a year, to some 30,000 students after 2022.
Victor Riches, the president of the Goldwater Institute, an Arizona-based group that advocates for school choice nationally, said Arizona’s law will be seen as a model as other states and the federal government seek to expand private-school-choice options under President Donald Trump’s administration. The group will seek to lift the cap on Arizona’s Empowerment Scholarship Accounts if there is demand.
“It’s a huge issue for Arizona, butit’s also a big issue at the national level,” Riches said. “With the passage of this bill, Arizona becomes the first state to have genuine school choice.”
But teachers and school groups-including a group of Teachers of the Year who met with Ducey on April 11-criticize the law as snatching money away from public schools in a state that ranks near the bottom of school funding nationally-$7,528 per pupil, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2014 figures. Critics also worry that more-affluent families would use the accounts to partially pay for private schools, which often charge more than the allocated amount. Plus, the costs could grow even higher for special education students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HX

 

Democrats link party rivals to DeVos as 2018 fights emerge
Teachers unions and others are attacking charter supporters in California, New York and New Jersey for doing the administration’s ‘dirty work.’
Politico

LOS ANGELES – It’s rare that Democrats are cast as puppets of the Trump administration. But on the issue of education, many Democrats who have long supported school choice are newly on the defensive within their party, forced to distance themselves from President Donald Trump and his education secretary, Betsy DeVos.
The unusual dynamic started soon after Trump’s inauguration, when a teachers union in Los Angeles sent voters mail depicting two charter-school-friendly school board contenders, both Democrats, as “the candidates who will implement the Trump/DeVos education agenda in LA.”
The message was repeated in New York, where the Alliance for Quality Education, an advocacy group partially funded by teachers unions, likened Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s education policies to Trump’s. The group urged online audiences to “stop Cuomo from doing Betsy DeVos’s dirty work.” In New Jersey, Sen. Cory Booker opposed DeVos’ appointment but came in for criticism for working with DeVos on school choice initiatives when he was mayor of Newark.
Though Democrats across the country widely repudiated DeVos, publicity surrounding her controversial appointment has allowed a new line of attack on members of the party who, while resisting school vouchers and certain teacher performance measures, have embraced charter school expansion and other education policies opposed by unions and traditional public school advocates.
Labor-backed Democrats are seizing on the DeVos issue as an opportunity ahead of the 2018 primary elections. In the race for California governor, Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom invoked DeVos’ appointment last month, telling a crowd in Hollister, California, that education would be the “wedge issue” in the 2018 campaign.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9I4

 

New Study: 3 Ways to Tell If a Charter School Will Struggle Before It Even Opens Its Doors
(New York) The 74

What if a bad school can be stopped before it ever exists?
That’s not the plot of an education-themed sci-fi show, but the aspiration of a new Fordham Institute report attempting to identify “risk factors” that predict the failure of a charter school. The study, based on data from four states, concludes that charters are more likely to be low-performing when their application does not identify a principal, states a commitment to a “child-centered instructional model,” and indicates plans to serve disadvantaged students without providing individualized tutoring.
In the foreword to the report, Fordham’s Amber Northern and Michael Petrilli say the findings should be helpful to policymakers but must be interpreted carefully. “If our results are used to automatically reject or fast-track an application, they have been misused,” they write. “Yet they ought, at minimum, to lead to considerably deeper inquiry, heightened due diligence, and perhaps a requirement for additional information.”
The study, “Three Signs That a Proposed Charter School Is at Risk of Failing,” was conducted by Anna Nicotera and David Stuit and released by the Fordham Institute, a conservative education think tank that generally backs charter schools as well as rules to hold them accountable for test score performance.
The analysis relies on data from Colorado, Indiana, North Carolina, and Texas, four states with large charter school sectors. Using information on charter school applications between 2011 and 2014,1 the researchers coded for a number of factors to see which predicted approval, and, in turn, performance.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9I5

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9I6 (Fordham Institute)

 

What’s Missing From Some State ESSA Plans?
Education Week

Under the Every Student Succeeds Act, states get to decide what goals to set for student achievement, how to gauge schools’ academic progress and quality, and more.
But in some of the 12 plans that have already been submitted to the U.S. Department of Education, elements are still to be determined. Some states didn’t completely spell out their student achievement goals. Others didn’t say exactly how much each individual factor would count toward schools’ overall ratings. And others proposed school quality indicators they didn’t fully explain.
The blank spots in state plans could set up an interesting test for U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, who has made local control a watchword for the department, but also said she is not going to rubber-stamp all plans. Will she approve plans despite the blanks? Reject the plans?
There are some middle-ground options too, including approving plans conditionally, or allowing states to add the missing information during the typical bureaucratic back-and-forth over plan details. The department also could decide to ask states to flesh out their plans before starting the peer review process.
So what exactly are these blank spots?
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HY

 

Schools should start later to prevent accidents, depression, scientists say
USA Today

Teenagers’ school days shouldn’t begin before 8:30 a.m., says American Academy of Sleep Medicine, linking early start times to car accidents, depression and poor academic performance.
In a position statement published Saturday in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, the sleep research group asserted that later start times aid peak alertness and performance while supporting better mental health and student safety.
As teenagers enter puberty, their biological programming for sleep shifts later, the statement notes, causing a clash with early start times that results in sleep depravation.
“Early school start times make it difficult for adolescents to get sufficient sleep on school nights, and chronic sleep loss among teens is associated with a host of problems, including poor school performance, increased depressive symptoms, and motor vehicle accidents,” said Nathaniel Watson, M.D., the statement’s lead author.
“Starting school at 8:30 a.m. or later gives teens a better opportunity to get the sufficient sleep they need to learn and function at their highest level.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HU

A copy of the statement
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HV (Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine) $

 

They’d be their families’ 1st in college, and with AVID’s help they’ll likely make it
(Boise) Idaho Statesman

One way that’s proving successful at getting more high school seniors to go to college is to help them build confidence, grit and an ethic of organization and hard work.
So West Ada School District is joining five other Idaho districts in starting to help students at risk of not going to colleges learn those skills and more.
West Ada, whose 38,000 students make it the state’s largest school district, is putting Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) into Mountain View and Meridian high schools. It will expand to other schools over the next several years.
AVID is used in more than 6,000 schools across the country, reaching 1.5 million students in 16 countries or territories. It combines instruction in organizational skills and note-taking with a rigorous curriculum, leadership-building skills and scholarship hunting to help students get to post-secondary education. Students, for example, learn a note-taking system that allows them to review, put questions into notes or look at specific material. Students also carry a large three-ringed binder to keep everything organized in one place: assignments to turn in, tests and quizzes, and papers returned from teachers.
Boise, Emmett, Homedale, Mountain Home, and Vallivue districts already use AVID.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9I1

 

Study shows four day school week may be ineffective
Daily Ardmoreite (OK)

A study conducted by the Oklahoma State Department of Education suggests that four-day school weeks may not be as cost effective as previously thought.
Many districts have resorted to exploring four-day school weeks as cuts to state aid put pressure on district budgets. A survey by the Oklahoma State School Boards Association early this month determined that at least 44 school districts are considering adopting a four-day school week or shortening the school year. An overwhelming majority of districts have considered cutting activities like art, athletics, advanced coursework and field trips, according to the survey.
With the four-day week trend picking up steam statewide, the OSDE conducted a study to find the cost effectiveness of the change. The results were, at best, varied.
The number of districts on a four-day school week almost doubled for this school year, with 97 districts trying the reduced week, according to the OSDE. The study looked at 16 districts expenditures and compared them to before they switched to the shorter week. Of the 16, nine districts actually spent more money on utilities, food, transportation and support staff after the switch. Eight of those nine also saw a decrease in Weighted Average Daily Membership, a metric used in calculating the amount of state aid funding a school will receive.
The study determined that, on average, school districts spent more on utilities and support staff, but less on food and transportation.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9I2

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9I3 (Oklahoma State Department of Education)

 

U.S. cargo ship blasts off for space station with supplies, experiments
Reuters

CAPE CANAVERAL, FLA. | A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket lifted off from Florida on Tuesday, propelling a cargo capsule filled with supplies and science experiments toward the International Space Station.
The 19-story booster soared off its seaside launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 11:11 a.m. EDT/1511 GMT. NASA broadcast an unprecedented 360-degree view of the launch via YouTube, in a debut of new video technology.
“A beautiful launch,” said Vern Thorp, a United Launch Alliance manager. “It looks like we nailed the orbit once again.”
Atop the rocket was an Orbital ATK Cygnus capsule loaded with more than 7,600 pounds (3,450 kg) of food, supplies and experiments for the station, a $100 billion research lab flying about 250 miles (400 km) above Earth.
The Cygnus is scheduled to reach the station, a project of 15 nations, on Saturday. Its cargo includes a greenhouse that the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration is testing to grow food for astronauts on long missions.
The capsule also carries 38 shoebox-sized satellites and a high school student’s science project that will test how telomeres, which are structures at the ends of chromosomes, are affected by microgravity.
As people age, telomeres tend to shorten. Preliminary results from a study of astronaut twins, however, show the telomeres of former astronaut Scott Kelly, who spent nearly a year aboard the station in 2015 and 2016, actually lengthened during his time in orbit, the opposite of what was expected.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9HW

 

Pro-vegan group seeks to ban processed meat from southern California school cafeterias
Fox

A non-profit advocacy group has teamed up with Los Angeles Unified District teacher Jennifer Macks and two others in San Diego County, to pressure two Southern California school districts to stop serving processed meats to students.
The group, The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), which advocates for a vegan, plant-based diet, filed the lawsuits against the Los Angeles and Poway, Calif. districts, alleging that the meat being served violates a state education code requirement that all food served in cafeterias must have the “greatest nutritional value possible” and be of the “highest quality.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9I9

 

Harvard Education Dean Runs Boston Marathon in Honor of 26 Teachers
Education Week

Here’s a fun Boston Marathon tradition: Jim Ryan, the dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, has once again run the race in honor of teachers.
Ryan asks the Harvard community to sponsor each of the 26 miles of the marathon as a way to raise money for financial aid for HGSE students. Each sponsor has named a teacher for Ryan to honor during his run. Those teachers are listed on Ryan’s running jersey, and each gets a T-shirt version of the jersey and a personal note from Ryan.
This year, Ryan honored 26 educators, including Maggie MacDonnell, the Canadian teacher who won a $1 million Global Teaching Prize.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9I0

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

April 21:

Utah State Board of Education Law and Licensing Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

Utah State Board of Education Finance Committee meeting
1 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

April 26:

Utah State Board of Education Standards and Assessment Committee meeting
9:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 4:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

June 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

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