Education News Roundup: April 20, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Latino students at Weber State discuss what they had to do to get to college.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jw (OSE)

Congratulations to this year’s Huntsman Awards for Excellence in Education winners.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jq (SLT)

Congratulations to this year’s STEM Innovation winners.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jk (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jl (UP)

Congratulations to Massachusetts Teacher of the Year Sydney Chaffee, who was named National Teacher of the Year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JG (WaPo)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9JH (CBS This Morning)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9JM (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9JJ (AP)
or http://gousoe.uen.org/9JI (CCSSO)

Secretary of Education DeVos writes about her belief in education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JY (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

ESSA will put a new emphasis on per-pupil spending.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JQ (Ed Week)
and per-pupil spending map
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JR (Ed Week)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Latino WSU students discuss parental expectations, undocumented relatives, more

Venture High students to share oral storytelling project about public lands

‘He is the biggest advocate for kids’: Utah teachers surprised with excellence awards
Two Nebo School District educators are first of 11 to receive Huntsman Awards for Excellence in Education this year.

5 to receive STEM Innovation Awards

Northridge High student honored as Air Force Military Child of the Year

Utah civics program requires girls to wear skirts or dresses; no pantsuits allowed
Utah Girls State » Tradition not a good enough reason to justify continuing the standard, she says.

Utah teen charged with making bomb threat at California high school

Utah principal under investigation put on leave

‘Football season won’t be the same without’ Dakota: Community mourns loss of Utah teen
Memorial » Students, family and friends gather to honor boy who died after collision.

Apple for the Teacher 2017: Who’s the best teacher in Northern Utah?

Utah Dad Goes Viral After Wetting Pants For Embarrassed Daughter

OPINION & COMMENTARY

State needs to solve teacher pay, retention problem

Immersion programs

I support all schools that put students first

The Trump Budget Puts America’s Students Last
Cutting funding for after-school programs would be devastating for low-income students

My Children’s Own (Nonelectronic) Devices
They question, imagine and create, while learning real-world social skills.

NATION

ESSA Aims to Shine Brighter Light on Per-Pupil Spending
Cost figures can prove elusive

Poll reveals support in California for tax-funded school vouchers

DeVos meets with teachers, students at Van Wert City Schools
U.S. Education Secretary joined round-table discussion

Obama’s former Education secretary ticks off how Trump is changing the department

Supreme Court case could pave the way for vouchers for Christian schools — or do just the opposite

For the first time, a charter school teacher wins National Teacher of the Year

Illinois and Everyone Else
Support for public higher education rose in 33 states and declined in 17 in 2016 — including a massive drop in Illinois.

State Board of Education compromises on how evolution is taught
Under the shortened curriculum, students will compare and contrast cell complexity and examine origin of DNA.

This Islamic School Helps Students Build Their American And Muslim Identity

What Students Should Know About Syria

GREEN Tool offers evidence-based guidance for school garden success

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Latino WSU students discuss parental expectations, undocumented relatives, more

OGDEN — When she was 15, Leticia Rodriguez, now a student at Weber State University, learned a tough lesson.
As her friends started investigating the possibility of college and scholarships, she suddenly realized that life after high school would likely be a very different experience for her. As an immigrant from Michoacan, Mexico, she couldn’t go after federal financial aid, for one thing, limiting her ability to pay for college.
“Doors immediately started closing for me,” she said. “It was very devastating seeing other students applying for scholarships while I couldn’t, despite having the same skills, potential and abilities that my friends had.”
In some ways, the college experience is universal, fraught with challenges for all. Latinos, however, particularly immigrants and first-generation students, can face distinct obstacles and frequently come to college with a very different backstory. To highlight that, several Latino WSU students took to the stage for a spoken word presentation, offering their very personal take on growing up and college life.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jw (OSE)

 

Venture High students to share oral storytelling project about public lands

When teaching teens about Utah’s public lands, and the many nuanced attitudes that accompany them, it helps to hit the trail.
With the controversy about Bears Ears National Monument still stirring up the state, around 30 students from Venture Academy High School visited the region between March 27 and March 30. They interviewed tourists, business owners and local government officials about the area. They traveled to different lands managed by different entities, from the National Park Service to the Bureau of Land Management to Utah State Parks.
They collected audio from the adventure, building their own oral storytelling project about public lands and learning a little about their value along the way.
On Friday, April 21, they’ll also get a chance to share the project on live radio.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JB (OSE)

 

‘He is the biggest advocate for kids’: Utah teachers surprised with excellence awards
Two Nebo School District educators are first of 11 to receive Huntsman Awards for Excellence in Education this year.

Spanish Fork • Several years ago, some of J. Merrill Hallam’s students joked that they were planning to toilet paper their teacher’s home.
Hallam responded in kind, joking that he would pay them each a visit “with a shovel” to dole out justice, keeping the threat cryptic.
Since then, the Spanish Fork Junior High teacher has kept a tongue-in-cheek list with the names of rabble-rousing pupils written on the handle of a shovel kept in his biology classroom.
But one shovel may no longer be enough, he said Wednesday — after the surprise announcement by students, family and fellow educators that Hallam is among the winners of this year’s Huntsman Awards for Excellence in Education.
“I got duped into this,” Merrill said. “I’m going to have to find a bigger shovel because you’re all going on the list.”
Each year, the Huntsman family honors seven teachers, three administrators and one school volunteer with an award that includes a $10,000 check from philanthropist and family patriarch Jon Huntsman Sr.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jq (SLT)

 

5 to receive STEM Innovation Awards

SALT LAKE CITY — The STEM Action Center will recognize five Utah individuals for their contributions to education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics statewide.
The recipients of the third annual STEM Innovation Awards are:
• Kathy Liu, a student at West High School.
• Dawn McNiel, a fifth-grade teacher at Mountainville Academy.
• John Donley, career and technical education coordinator in the Weber School District.
• Jill Wood, a day camp director with the YMCA of Northern Utah.
• Mark Jones, a counselor at West Jordan Middle School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jk (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jl (UP)

 

Northridge High student honored as Air Force Military Child of the Year

A Northridge High School senior has been named Air Force Military Child of the Year.
Jamal Braxton said he found out about the award in February but was recognized for the honor at a Tuesday, April 18, Davis School District Board of Education meeting.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jv (OSE)

 

Utah civics program requires girls to wear skirts or dresses; no pantsuits allowed
Utah Girls State » Tradition not a good enough reason to justify continuing the standard, she says.

Chloe Collins canvassed for Sen. Bernie Sanders in Nevada last summer. She interns for a community organizer in Utah. But the Cottonwood High School senior was discouraged when she found out that her summer plans for civic growth would include “a way to force women to make themselves smaller.”
The 17-year-old was surprised that Utah Girls State ­— a five-day camp that teaches high school seniors about local and national government — requires attendees to wear skirts or dresses with blouses.
No pantsuits allowed.
“The dress code, I feel, is doing a disservice to all the girls,” Collins said. “When I found out that I had to wear a dress or a skirt, I was a little offended.”
The American Legion Auxiliary (ALA) Girls State program develops “leadership skills, confidence and action-based understanding of the government process,” according to its website.
Young women attending the program are required to bring “dresses or skirts and blouses to wear every day.” Utah Boys State requires participants to wear trousers and provides a T-shirt for participants, according to the program’s website.
Wearing a dress or skirt makes Collins uncomfortable, she said, because she has to adjust the way she sits and carries herself.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jr (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Js (KUTV)

 

Utah teen charged with making bomb threat at California high school

A Utah teen is facing terrorism threat charges after an incident in which police say he called in a bomb threat to a California high school.
The 15-year-old boy called the administrative office at Chino Hills High School on April 4, and said there was a bomb on campus, according to a press release from the San Bernardino, CA Sheriff’s Office.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9K0 (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9K1 (San Bernardino [CA] Sun)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9K2 ([Los Angeles] KCAL)

 

Utah principal under investigation put on leave

SALT LAKE CITY — A Salt Lake City elementary school principal has been placed on leave while police investigate a report of inappropriate conduct involving a student.
Reports say Edison Elementary School Principal Laurie Lacy is being investigated for an allegation made earlier this month.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JC (AP via OSE)

 

‘Football season won’t be the same without’ Dakota: Community mourns loss of Utah teen
Memorial » Students, family and friends gather to honor boy who died after collision.

Syracuse • Blue and orange usually represent Syracuse Junior High School, but on Wednesday night, the Seahawks wore purple.
Dakota Kilburn loved the NFL’s Minnesota Vikings more than anything, so the team’s purple is what his classmates chose to represent the 15-year-old at a vigil the day after he died.
Hundreds of people carried candles and purple plastic cups to remember Dakota, gathering near the crosswalk that two days earlier had been given a new unofficial name: Koda’s Crossing.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jx (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jy (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jz (OSE)

 

Apple for the Teacher 2017: Who’s the best teacher in Northern Utah?

Who is the local teacher who’s had the greatest impact on you or your child — the one who works hard every day to inspire students and help them grow?
We want to know your answer to that question.
This year the Standard-Examiner will honor a local teacher with its Apple for the Teacher award. To kick the process off, send us a nomination for the local teacher you think should be recognized for his or her work.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JA (OSE)

 

Utah Dad Goes Viral After Wetting Pants For Embarrassed Daughter

Cedar City, UT — A Utah dad is getting a lot of love on social media after trying to reassure his daughter that it was okay that she wet her pants in school. Ben Sowards says his daughter called him in tears last week after the embarrassing incident during her kindergarten class. Sowards says he just wanted to make his little girl smile, so he put water on the front of his pants before heading to her Cedar City school. Dad and daughter took a picture together showing the prominent stain and it was tweeted by the girl’s older sister. The photo has been liked and shared by more than a quarter-of-a-million people.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JE (MUR)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9JZ (KSTU via SGN)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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State needs to solve teacher pay, retention problem
Deseret News editorial

The state needs a comprehensive plan for solving the state’s teacher pay and retention problem.
​In lieu of a comprehensive policy on the state level to deal with a growing shortage of public school teachers, at least three large school districts are taking matters into their own hands by looking for ways to increase teacher pay. Their plans will probably involve increases in property taxes, even while the Legislature has looked at but so far rejected calls to raise taxes for additional education funding.
​In a perfect world, there would be more guidance from state lawmakers on how to deal with a legitimate crisis in recruiting and retaining a sufficient number of qualified educators. With districts acting on their own, we face the risk of what some educators are calling an “arms race” among schools competing with each other on the hiring front. While district leaders are doing what they feel they need to do to staff their classrooms, their actions could eventually lead to disparities in the qualifications of the teaching corps between wealthier districts and those with a shallower property tax well to dip into. It’s in the state’s interest to avoid that scenario.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jt

 

Immersion programs
Deseret News letter from Justin Gilbert

I believe that language immersion programs help young students understand other cultures, improve their performance in their secular learning and also help them in the workplace. The amount of language immersion programs in the United States has increased greatly over the last 35 years (from 30 programs in 1981 to 448 programs in 2011). This can only be described as a good thing for students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ju

 

I support all schools that put students first
Cleveland Plain Dealer op-ed by Betsy DeVos, U.S. secretary of education

WASHINGTON, D.C. — In today’s polarized environment, it can often be hard to discern the truth. So allow me to lay out two facts plainly and clearly:
I believe every student should have an equal opportunity to get a great education.
And I believe many of those great educations are, and will continue to be, provided by traditional public schools.
These are not new views for me. You may just never have heard them if you only read about my views in the press.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JY

 

The Trump Budget Puts America’s Students Last
Cutting funding for after-school programs would be devastating for low-income students
Education Week op-ed by Margaret McKenna, chairman of the board of the National Summer Learning Association

President Donald Trump’s “America First” federal-budget blueprint, released last month, stands to undermine one of the nation’s most successful K-12 learning programs. The president’s suggested funding cuts would take away resources that are critical to the academic success and healthy development of our most vulnerable students.
The Trump administration has proposed eliminating the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program—the only source of federal funding, an annual $1.1 billion, for after-school and summer programs. Since the 1990s, the program has funded nearly 9,600 centers nationwide—most located in schools in high-poverty communities. This measure would affect the more than 1 million children now enrolled in federally financed programs across the country.
In rationalizing the proposed cut, Mick Mulvaney, the White House budget chief, claimed there is “no demonstrable evidence” that after-school programs, designed to help low-income children do better in school, are successful. Whether administration officials are consciously rejecting evidence or just alarmingly uninformed, they are completely wrong.
On the contrary, after-school and summer learning programs are a highly effective and cost-efficient way to maintain the educational progress students make during the school year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JP

 

My Children’s Own (Nonelectronic) Devices
They question, imagine and create, while learning real-world social skills.
Wall Street Journal op-ed by Batsheva Neuer, a writer in New York

My 5-year-old son is beyond his years in many ways—with one big exception. He still doesn’t know how to turn on an iPad. In an effort to stave off a lifetime of device dependence, my husband and I have nurtured a screen-free environment in our home. It’s kooky, but if you ask me, it’s made all the difference in my children’s development.
Having both been raised in homes without televisions, our decision to limit screens came somewhat naturally to us. We wanted to delay technologically induced social isolation and encourage our children to develop skills that would serve them well in the real world. In our minds, childhood should be about fostering social interactions, encouraging creativity, and responding to real-world stimuli.
To cultivate a screen-free environment—if only for a few years—we’ve taken an old-fashioned approach. We bought a 1987 Golden Book Encyclopedia set on eBay . We’ve also developed a habit of contacting “local experts.” How does the sun move? That’s a good question for Uncle Ariel, who studied chemistry in college. How do you build a door? Ask Uncle David, the contractor. Who created the world? As the self-appointed Bible scholar, that’s my turf.
We aren’t absolutists. The only way the children can survive the eight-hour drive to my Canadian parents’ home in one piece is by watching “Sesame Street” on the TV screen in the back seat of our SUV. And when it’s been weeks since they’ve seen their grandparents, we know that they have more to gain than lose by a video-chat session.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jn $

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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ESSA Aims to Shine Brighter Light on Per-Pupil Spending
Cost figures can prove elusive
Education Week

States and school districts are girding for a little-known but tricky piece of the Every Student Succeeds Act: the requirement that states report per-pupil spending for all their schools, a level of detail unknown even to many district superintendents.
Without specific federal guidance so far, state finance officials must untangle the myriad—and sometimes obscure—costs behind school operations to come up with a single figure for each of the nation’s 99,000 public schools.
Do transportation and school lunch count as a district’s administrative costs, for example, or are they school costs? How do you split the expense of a bus that stops at several schools?
“It’s a big shift in how we’ve traditionally seen finance data,” said Maureen Wentworth, the director of education data and information systems for the Council of Chief State School Officers. “It’s going to open a window of new conversation across states and districts.”
Presenting school spending data in a comparable way to the public in annual school report cards starting in 2017-18, as ESSA requires, also could have dramatic political repercussions, according to district and state officials who have conducted such forensic audits in the past. The data could figure into everything from basic maintenance to the distribution of experienced teachers, the fate of magnet programs, and other sensitive policy decisions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JQ

Per-pupil spending map
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JR (Ed Week)

 

Poll reveals support in California for tax-funded school vouchers
San Francisco Chronicle

President Trump supports tax-funded vouchers letting parents send their kids to private schools of their choice — and it turns out Californians do too, according to a poll released Wednesday.
A solid majority of state residents, 60 percent, say they favor vouchers, and public school parents like them even more, with two-thirds saying they back the idea, according to a Public Policy Institute of California survey.
The annual education survey, conducted in early April, queried residents about a range of issues, including teacher quality, school funding, early childhood education and the impact of immigration policies on schools. This year, the pollsters included the question on vouchers, given the Trump administration’s proposal to use tax dollars to help families pay for private or parochial school.
California’s gut reaction to vouchers shouldn’t be surprising, said Michael Kirst, president of the state Board of Education. If you ask people whether they’d like free money to pay for a school of their choice, most will say yes, Kirst said.
In 1998, the last time the PPIC asked about vouchers, 58 percent of residents said they supported them. However, California voters have twice rejected statewide propositions on vouchers, Kirst said, in 1993 and 2000.
“The experience has been the devil is in the details,” he said. “As the public sees the details behind it and the various problems, this support drops off fast.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JS

A copy of the poll
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JT (Public Policy Institute of California)

 

DeVos meets with teachers, students at Van Wert City Schools
U.S. Education Secretary joined round-table discussion
Toledo (OH) Blade

VAN WERT, Ohio — U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos joined an unlikely touring companion in an unexpected place as she meets today with teachers and students at Van Wert City Schools.
President Trump’s cabinet pick, controversial among many public school educators for her charter school advocacy, is spending several hours in this rural northwest Ohio district with one of her most-vocal critics, a teachers union president.
Randi Weingarten, leader of the 1.6 million-member American Federation of Teachers, joined Ms. DeVos in Van Wert at the invitation of the local union president.
Lori Bittner, principal of the Van Wert Early Childhood Center, which serves 325 preschool and kindergarten students —including those with special needs — welcomed Ms. DeVos and shook her hand.
She ushered her into a room where parents and teachers held a round-table discussion with her.
Ms. DeVos and Ms. Weingarten sat side by side at the head of the table, asking those gathered about their work with students.
The secretary’s first question was about intervention strategies for early childhood education and then to talk directly with mothers and fathers of students.
“I’d love to hear from the parents,” Ms. DeVos said later.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jo

http://gousoe.uen.org/9JF (WaPo)

 

Obama’s former Education secretary ticks off how Trump is changing the department
Los Angeles Times

Since finishing his tenure as President Obama’s second Education secretary, King has watched a new administration implement policies diametrically opposed to his own.
“As a teacher, as a parent and as a citizen, it’s distressing to see the department walking away from its core responsibility of advancing equity,” he said Wednesday.
King is starting a new job as president and chief executive of the Education Trust, a Washington-based nonprofit focused on educational equity. He spoke at an outdoor reception organized by the group’s California outpost, EdTrust-West, in downtown Los Angeles.
After his speech, he outlined in an interview the different ways the federal government’s role in education has changed since the inauguration of President Trump.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JW

 

Supreme Court case could pave the way for vouchers for Christian schools — or do just the opposite
Washington Post

The specific question that the Supreme Court discussed Wednesday morning may have been settled before the justices even heard the case.
The matter concerns a Lutheran church in Missouri which applied for state funding to refurbish its preschool playground, but was told that the state Constitution forbids financially supporting a religious institution. The question of whether the church should be eligible for the playground funding made it all the way to the highest court in the nation — but then last week, Missouri’s new governor declared that he was changing the policy, and the church could apply for the playground program after all.
Case closed, right?
Not for the Supreme Court, which heard arguments in Trinity Lutheran Church v. Comer on Wednesday despite the late-breaking news from Missouri. And not for advocates on both sides, who see potentially monumental consequences of the case, either for expanding churches’ access to government funds or for cutting them off from basic government services they have long enjoyed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Jp

 

For the first time, a charter school teacher wins National Teacher of the Year
Washington Post

Sydney Chaffee, a ninth-grade humanities teacher from Boston, has been named National Teacher of the Year, making her the first teacher from Massachusetts — and the first working in a charter school — to win the honor.
Chaffee will spend the next year traveling the country, talking with teachers and serving as an ambassador for their profession. She’s taking on that responsibility at a time when education policy is even more intensely politicized than usual, as President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos have sought to promote parents’ access to charter schools, private-school vouchers and other alternatives to public schools.
Chaffee said that she intends to use her platform to send the message that “public schools are the best schools” — and that charter schools are public schools that are strongest when they’re held accountable for students’ performance.
“The conversation needs to be rooted in what are all of our public schools doing, and how can they work together to make sure that kids are getting the best education possible?” she said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JG

http://gousoe.uen.org/9JH (CBS This Morning)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9JM (Ed Week)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9JJ (AP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9JI (CCSSO)

 

Illinois and Everyone Else
Support for public higher education rose in 33 states and declined in 17 in 2016 — including a massive drop in Illinois.
Inside Higher Ed

It’s impossible to examine state higher education finances in 2016 without separating the collapse in Illinois from a more nuanced picture across the rest of the country.
State and local support for higher education in Illinois plunged as the state’s lawmakers and governor were unable to reach a budget agreement and instead passed severely pared-down stopgap funding. Educational appropriations per full-time equivalent student in the state skidded 80 percent year over year, from $10,986 to $2,196. Enrollment in public institutions dropped by 11 percent, or 46,000 students.
That situation proved to be enough of an outlier that it weighed down several key markers in the 2016 State Higher Education Finance report from the State Higher Education Executive Officers association, which is being released today. The report annually offers an in-depth look at the breakdown of state and local funding, tuition revenue, enrollment, and degree completion across public higher education, a sector that enrolls roughly three-quarters of students in U.S. postsecondary education.
Include Illinois in the report’s key markers, and overall public support for higher education fell by 1.8 percent per full-time equivalent student in 2016, to $6,954, according to the report. Exclude Illinois, and overall support increased by 3.2 percent, to $7,116.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JU

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JV (State Higher Education Executive Officers Association)

 

State Board of Education compromises on how evolution is taught
Under the shortened curriculum, students will compare and contrast cell complexity and examine origin of DNA.
Austin (TX) American-Statesman

The State Board of Education has compromised on how Texas high school students will learn about the theory of evolution in school.
“I think this is a product … of the board recognizing the input … and working with the committee to come up with an acceptable language … that both meets the expectations of the committee and also balances with it the input I’ve received from constituents, educators, community members and a lot of other folks,” said board vice chairman Marty Rowley, R-Amarillo.
On Wednesday, the panel gave preliminary approval of new high school biology curriculum that is slightly pared down from the current standards. The move follows a months-long process examining how evolution should be taught in classrooms.
Currently, high school students must learn about scientific phenomena that can’t readily be explained by evolution, like cell complexity, origin of DNA and life and abrupt appearances in fossil records, which left-leaning critics have said invites teachings of creationism and intelligent design.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JX

 

This Islamic School Helps Students Build Their American And Muslim Identity
NPR Morning Edition

Like any good fifth-grade teacher, Mike Matthews wants to make his social studies unit on the American West as exciting as possible. So he’s planning a special “Wild West” evening at the school with his students.
“We’re going to have good ol’ cowboy-fashion hot dogs and beans, Texas Toast and beef jerky,” he says. Matthews will tell stories around a mock campfire, and for added authenticity, the fifth-graders will set up a saloon.
Of course, the saloon scene will be free of any references to alcohol, since the school — Al Fatih Academy in Reston, Va. — is an Islamic institution.
“We had the discussion already about what is appropriate, according to our mission,” Matthews says. “The students are going to create an indoor saloon, but we’re going to make it kid-friendly.”
The academy, which serves elementary and middle school grades, was established in 1999, “to cultivate and nurture a thriving American Muslim identity that balances religious, academic and cultural knowledge and imparts the importance of civic involvement and charitable work.”
The school combines traditional classes with Islamic instruction. All students take Arabic, recite from the Quran, and are taught how to pray. Shad Imam, who has a daughter and a son enrolled here, says he and his wife were drawn to this school because of the way Islamic ideas are woven into the curriculum.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JD

 

What Students Should Know About Syria
Education Week

Students may have heard that the United States recently dropped a bomb in Syria. Or they may have heard about the chemical weapons the country’s leader is said to have to attack his own people. They may have heard the country’s name among those whose citizens President Donald Trump aimed to ban from traveling to the United States. Or they may have met new neighbors from the Middle Eastern nation who have arrived as refugees.
How can teachers address the complex and horrific situation in Syria? TED-ed, the youth education branch of the media organization that produces TED talks, has some suggestions about topics to cover:
* Syria’s history and cultural significance, including the many important artifacts in the Mediterranean country;
* The origins of the refugee crisis and the definition of a refugee; and
* How different countries have responded to the crisis.
TED includes links to some resources on each of the topics and suggests that teachers encourage students to reflect on their own responses to the crisis and how they might act if they were in a position of political power.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JN

http://gousoe.uen.org/9JO (TED-ed)

 

GREEN Tool offers evidence-based guidance for school garden success
Reuters

Planting a successful school garden requires a lot more than just soil, seeds and water, say researchers who have come up with a planning tool that can help ensure school gardens thrive and endure.
A teacher or parent may be the driving force behind getting a garden started, but once the teacher leaves the school, or the parent’s child graduates, gardens can wither away unless they have been well integrated into the school community, the study team writes in Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
School gardens have a host of health and educational benefits, from getting kids to eat more fruits and vegetables to boosting academic achievement in science, math and reading, they write.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JK

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9JL (Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) $

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

April 21:

Utah State Board of Education Law and Licensing Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

Utah State Board of Education Finance Committee meeting
1 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

April 26:

Utah State Board of Education Standards and Assessment Committee meeting
9:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 4:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

May 16:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

May 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., TBD
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=INTEDU

June 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

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