Education News Roundup: April 21, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Congratulations to Davis School District on its AP honor.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kl (OSE)

Gang conference takes a look at junior high and high school aged gang members.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KN (KSTU)

Arizona Republic takes a closer look at the new voucher program there.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kd (Republic)

’90s icons Carmen San Diego and the Miss Frizzle are back.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KL (Entertainment Weekly)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Davis School District receives AP Honor Roll accolade

Davis School district approves slew of facility upgrades at 18 schools

Retired teacher advocates for refugees while battling cancer

Utah police discuss rise of criminal activity among children at annual gang conference

Hurricane High teacher arrested in sexual battery case involving student

First-grader hit by Dodge Durango near Taylorsville school

Police arrest parents they say gave teen pot to help him in school

Salt Lake police investigate alleged bleach throwing at West High

Students accuse civics program of having sexist dress code

Utah State Evaluation Report Validates Literacy Gains For Students Using Lexia Reading Core5
External Evaluators Also Find Lexia’s Blended Learning Program to be the Only State-Approved Literacy Offering to Demonstrate a Positive Effect on First Grade Reading Levels

Altara Elementary School students take cover during The Great Shakeout

Field trip gives students a chance to scope out the Great Salt Lake

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Thumbs up, thumbs down

Student-centered education

Trump and DeVos should prepare to fight for school choice

How to Hire a Superintendent Who Will Stick Around
Five pitfalls in hiring district leaders and how to avoid them

’90s education is so hot right now

NATION

Key Takeaways: State Accountability Plans Under ESSA

The Effectiveness Dilemma
Teacher prep programs have mixed results but experts question President Donald Trump’s decision to cut them.

Arizona is expanding its school-voucher program. What does it mean for parents?

Trump Picks Ex-HP Executive for Top Management Job at Education Department

‘Rank and file’ educators protest sweeping cuts to APS programs

What Does the ‘March for Science’ Mean for STEM Education?

How Hedge Fund Billionaire James Simons Is Changing Math Education

How Many States Are Following Federal Restraint and Seclusion Guidelines?

More teen knowledge about concussion may not increase reporting

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Davis School District receives AP Honor Roll accolade

BOUNTIFUL – The Davis School District has been recognized as one of four districts in the United States that has made the AP Honor Roll for seven consecutive years.
Districts that are members of the College Board can make the AP Honor Roll by increasing or sustaining the number of students taking Advanced Placement tests and earning high scores.
Nancy Potter, the director of the Western Regional Office for K12 State and District Partnerships, honored the Davis Board of Education at a meeting Tuesday, April 18.
“You’re doing amazingly wonderful things for kids,” she said.
Davis School District students took 4,412 AP exams in May 2016, according to AP data Potter presented to the board. Since students can earn at least three college credits for each successful AP exam, that saved families an estimate of $2.9 million in college expenses.
A total of 3,343 Davis School District students took 5,747 AP exams in 2016. In Utah, 25,142 students took 38,685 exams, Potter said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kl (OSE)

 

Davis School district approves slew of facility upgrades at 18 schools

FARMINGTON – Davis School District approved a slew of facility upgrades for several schools Tuesday.
The Board of Education approved installing new air conditioning units or replacing old ones at several elementary schools – Oak Hills, South Weber, Tolman, Washington Bountiful, Crestview, Meadowbrook, Orchard, Steward, Vae View, Adelaide, Centerville, Clinton, Fremont. Centerville Junior High School will also have new and renovated air conditioning.
Construction is slated to begin in June and end in August, according to board documents. The endeavor will be paid for with capital funds. The board approved bids on the projects totaling $5.6 million.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Km (OSE)

 

Retired teacher advocates for refugees while battling cancer

SOUTH SALT LAKE, Utah- When The Church of Jesus Christ Latter-day Saints launched its “I Was a Stranger” initiative last year, Don Ward couldn’t help but smile.
People were suddenly motivated and wanted to get involved. But there was a problem.
“I had people say, ‘I would really love to help refugees. I wish there were some in Utah,'” Ward said. “I’d tell them there are 60,000 refugees in Utah, and they’d say, ‘Are you serious?'”
The figure of 60,000 is correct, according to the Utah Refugee Coalition. The refugees primarily come from countries in Asia, Africa and the Middle East and find homes in Salt Lake County.
Ward, a 75-year-old retired high school history teacher, estimated that he and others have helped more than 20,000 refugees in Salt Lake County over the past eight years.
And he’s done so while battling cancer.
“I feel I have been blessed in my life . and this is a way to show appreciation for those blessings,” Ward said. “Against some significant odds, I am still here. I know I still have cancer, but because I’m so busy with these things . cancer is not the focus of my life.”
Ward taught AP history and student government at Jordan and Alta high schools for 35 years before he retired, although he continues to be a substitute teacher.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kn (AP via OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9KO (AP via PDH)

 

Utah police discuss rise of criminal activity among children at annual gang conference

SANDY, Utah — Law enforcement personnel met in Sandy for their 27th annual gang conference this week, and while many things regarding gangs and gang enforcement have changed, cops said several things stay the same.
Those involved in the lifestyle are usually after money and power, and it usually involves drugs and guns.
“Death or prison, those are your only two choices if you choose this lifestyle,” said Lt. Mike Schoenfeld of the Metro Gang Unit.
The disturbing trend for police, prosecutors and school officials is that gang members seem to be getting younger.
Many high-profile crimes over the past year, including the death of West Valley City Officer Cody Brotherson, involved gang suspects who are junior high or early high school age.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KN (KSTU)

 

Hurricane High teacher arrested in sexual battery case involving student

HURRICANE, Washington County – A teacher at Hurricane High School was arrested Thursday and accused of having an inappropriate relationship with a 17-year-old student.
Aaron Karl Esplin, 40, of LaVerkin, was arrested for investigation of dealing in harmful materials to a minor, sexual battery and exploitation of a minor.
Hurricane police were notified by the school that they “had received information of an inappropriate relationship between a 17-year-old female student and her teacher,” according to a prepared statement from the police department.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kf (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kp (KSL via SGN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kq (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ky (DN via KSL)

 

First-grader hit by Dodge Durango near Taylorsville school

TAYLORSVILLE – A first-grade boy is in the hospital with broken bones after he darted in front of an SUV near his school Thursday.
Police say the 7-year-old is in fair condition after the collision that happened just as school let out. A crossing guard was directing students a little ways down the street, officers said. It was not immediately clear why the boy ran into the road.
People who saw the accident told investigators the driver of the white Durango was driving responsibly at the time of the accident, said Unified Police Lt. Brian Lohrke.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kg (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kh (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kr (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kt (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kx (DN via KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9KA (KSTU)

 

Police arrest parents they say gave teen pot to help him in school

SPANISH FORK – Police say parents of a 14-year-old son who allowed the boy to smoke marijuana have been arrested at their home.
Edwin Lee Steward and Valerie Steward, both 37, were booked into Utah County jail Tuesday for investigation of felony child endangerment and misdemeanor charges of contributing to delinquency of a minor, marijuana possession and drug paraphernalia possession.
The couple told police they allow their son to smoke a joint or two at night if he goes to class and makes good grades, said Utah County Sheriff’s Sgt. Spencer Cannon. The parents also said they left marijuana around the home, Cannon said, explaining they used the drug to alleviate medical issues and believed it helped their son focus in school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kk (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ko (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ku (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kw (DN via KSL)

 

Salt Lake police investigate alleged bleach throwing at West High

SALT LAKE CITY – Police are investigating allegations that students may have thrown bleach on classmates during a pep rally at West High School earlier this month.
On April 7, students at West High were in the gymnasium for the annual Spirit Bowl, a competition between classes. At some point during the assembly, bleach was thrown into the crowd.
Salt Lake police are investigating whether a senior or group of seniors were upset with members of the freshman class for beating them.
Two students were sent to the hospital and later released, according to police.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kj (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kz (DN via KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9KB (KSTU)

 

Students accuse civics program of having sexist dress code

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah female students are accusing a national organization of having a sexist dress code.
The dress code for the American Legion of Auxiliary’s Utah Girls State requires girls wear only blouses with skirts or dresses throughout most of the program. It specifically bans pantsuit options.
Cottonwood High School senior Chloe Collins, who worked for a presidential campaign and is a community organizer’s intern, says the dress code will make it hard for her to feel comfortable at the program. Collins says constantly having to keep her sitting position in mind will impact her experience.
Girls State education director Cary Fisher says the board previously considered adding pantsuits to the dress code.
Fisher says girls who do not agree with the dress code can chose not to attend.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ki (AP via DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kv (AP via KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9KR (AP via USN&WR)

 

Utah State Evaluation Report Validates Literacy Gains For Students Using Lexia Reading Core5
External Evaluators Also Find Lexia’s Blended Learning Program to be the Only State-Approved Literacy Offering to Demonstrate a Positive Effect on First Grade Reading Levels

BOSTON – After implementing Lexia Reading Core5(r) for more than 55,000 students, Utah schools have seen considerable literacy gains. According to a new report released by the Utah State Board of Education for the Early Intervention Software Program grant (EISP) 2015-2016 school year, students with strong performance in Core5 also had increased gains in The Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS). DIBELS are a set of procedures and measures for assessing the acquisition of early literacy skills for students in kindergarten through sixth grade. The Evaluation and Training Institute (ETI), which conducted the report, also found that students using Core5 had the highest fidelity of use across all the literacy products being assessed.
The ETI report noted that additional weeks of Core5 use were associated with increased DIBELS scores for students in grades K-2 and Core5 had the most consistently positive results for usage across all literacy programs evaluated. Moreover, Core5 was the only product to demonstrate a positive effect on first grade reading skills.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KS (Lexia)

 

Altara Elementary School students take cover during The Great Shakeout

SANDY, Utah – Students at Altara Elementary School is Sandy were among the nearly one-million people who took part in the Great Shakeout, a worldwide drill to prepare people for earthquakes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ks (KTVX)

 

Field trip gives students a chance to scope out the Great Salt Lake

Micah Vernon, a fourth-grader at Orchard Elementary School, looks through binoculars while on a field trip at the Great Salt Lake Shorelands Preserve in Layton on Thursday, April 20, 2017.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ke (DN)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Thumbs up, thumbs down
(Provo) Daily Herald editorial


Provo resident Emily Nelson is being recognized as Utah’s PTA Volunteer of the Year. Nelson’s commitment to serving in her city’s schools and making them a better place for every student is infectious and should be something we all value.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KP

 

Student-centered education
Deseret News op-ed by M. Donald Thomas, a retired superintendent of schools, and Lynn Stoddard, who has 50 years of experience as a teacher, principal and education leader

“The secret of education lies in respecting the pupil. It is not for you to choose what he shall know, what he shall do.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson
Public education in our nation is in serious trouble. Jefferson’s “general diffusion of knowledge” has now become a general infusion of robots. Jefferson wished to provide education as the knowledge base for individual growth and self-expression. Today, however, schools are rapidly becoming factories that attempt to produce similarity rather than variety of human expression.
The purpose of education is to develop individual self-enlightenment, for each person to become a unique individual, possessing attributes and values that are self-developed, not stamped in their heads by a predetermined subject-centered standard. It is time, therefore, that we begin to change our education system from one centered on subject matter to one that is student-centered.
Student-centered education differs from one that is centered on content (or subject). SCE consists of experiences that nurture each child’s unique strengths, talents, interests and character. Education, as Jefferson intended it, is to assist each child, in his own way, to become a valuable contributing member of the general society.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KQ

 

Trump and DeVos should prepare to fight for school choice
(Washington, DC) The Hill op-ed by RICK ESENBERG, president and general counsel at Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty, AND CJ SZAFIR, Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty’s vice president for policy and deputy counsel

The Trump Administration is setting their sights on a tax-reform package which could include a new national school choice tax credit program likely favored by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and Congressional Republicans.
This is a worthwhile pursuit but not an easy one.
The Trump Administration should learn the lessons of Milwaukee, home to the country’s oldest and one of its largest school voucher programs. Even though Milwaukee shows that school choice can work, any national voucher plan will have plenty of opponents who will work to undermine it, putting their interests ahead of children.
Starting in 1990, a bipartisan coalition created the nation’s first private school choice program in Milwaukee. The Milwaukee Parental Choice Program currently gives families at 300 percent of the poverty line or below access to a taxpayer funded voucher of $7,646 (average) to attend a private school of their choice. The program is incredibly popular, serving over 27,000 low-income children at 121 private schools in Milwaukee.
Not every private voucher school is high-performing.
But new research by our colleague, Dr. Will Flanders, adds to the growing number of studies showing how children in the Milwaukee choice program are better off than their peers in Milwaukee Public Schools – which receives 30 percent more per student than the voucher (more if you include federal dollars) to produce a dismal graduation rate of 58 percent and 23,000 children attending 41 failing schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KM

 

How to Hire a Superintendent Who Will Stick Around
Five pitfalls in hiring district leaders and how to avoid them
Education Week op-ed by Cathy Mincberg, president and CEO for the Center for Reform of School Systems

The average superintendent tenure is approximately three years in urban districts and six years in suburban districts, according to a 2014 Council of the Great City Schools survey, and those time spans make it hard to develop and institute significant improvements. While some factors shortening superintendent tenure are beyond control, many other factors are manageable. Here are some common pitfalls your local school board must circumnavigate when choosing new district leadership:
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KF

 

’90s education is so hot right now
Entertainment Weekly commentary by columnist MARC SNETIKER

With the newly-announced return of yet another paragon of millennial mystique – Carmen Sandiego, she of oversized fedoras and under-detailed itineraries – it appears time to make The Announcement: 2017’s hottest new trend is ’90s education.
You must understand something about the so-called “’90s kids” you read so much about on weblogs. It’s not just all Nickelodeon cartoons and Disney princesses and discontinued lines of dunkable graham crackers. For this generation of Geocities slickers, growing up in the ’90s also meant living on the receiving end of what the advent of computers meant for education; the twenty- and thirtysomethings whose thinkpieces you now actively ignore online probably first learned their typing skills and pixelated prowess through the educational programs worshipped in an ancient house of sacrifice known as a “computer lab.”
This “computer lab” was a temple, and as with any altar, there were deities worth worshipping – and apparently, these goddesses have been deemed worthy of late indoctrination to a new, savvier generation of children. That’s the conceit, anyway, with so many of these nostalgic rebirths, but something feels different about folks like Carmen Sandiego or The Magic School Bus’ Miss Frizzle. It’s no longer a curious thing for ’90s icons to be back in vogue, but these characters demand to be seen through a different lens than the rest of the reboot mania dominating the zeitgeist.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KL

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Key Takeaways: State Accountability Plans Under ESSA
Education Week

Twelve states and the District of Columbia have submitted plans for implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act. The law gives states significant new leeway to set student achievement goals and calls for looking beyond test scores in gauging school performance.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KI

 

The Effectiveness Dilemma
Teacher prep programs have mixed results but experts question President Donald Trump’s decision to cut them.
U.S. News & World Report

The most important factor in a student’s academic success is an effective teacher, most education policy experts agree. In fact, high quality instruction can counter crippling disadvantages, like those associated with low socioeconomic background.
That’s why Florida’s Palm Beach County school district, where about 65 percent of its 190,000 students are poor enough to qualify for free and reduced-priced lunch, places so much emphasis on teacher preparation and professional development.
“As a superintendent, the better you hire and the better you develop, the better the outcomes,” says Robert Avossa, superintendent of Palm Beach County school district. “We have to invest in people and we have to invest in them fast and furious because the kids are coming to us more and more disadvantaged, more children from single-family homes, more children living in poverty.”
Avossa directly credits those efforts with spring boarding 21 of its 28 schools labeled “F” or “D” last year to a “C” or higher this year.
If having great teachers in the classroom is so important, why then is $2.4 billion in federal funding for teacher preparation, the third-largest federal K-12 program in the country, on the chopping block?
The Trump administration’s fiscal 2018 budget proposal calls the program, known as Title II, Part A or the Supporting Effective Instruction grant program, “poorly targeted and spread thinly across thousands of districts with scant evidence of impact.” Its axing is one of the biggest single-line items up for elimination in the president’s sweeping $9 billion cut to federal education programs.
As it turns out, the Trump administration isn’t the first to take aim at the program, which was also a favorite punching bag of former Education Secretary Arne Duncan during the Obama era.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KJ

 

Arizona is expanding its school-voucher program. What does it mean for parents?
(Phoenix) Arizona Republic

The Arizona Legislature has passed one of the most expansive school-voucher programs in the nation.
In April, Gov. Doug Ducey signed into law Senate Bill 1431, which allows all 1.1 million public-school students to apply for the Empowerment Scholarship Account program. The program gives public funds to students to use on private-school tuition, therapies and other educational services. Republican lawmakers narrowly approved the plan, which allows an estimated 30,000 students to take part in the program by 2022.
Many Republicans hail the plan as a novel way to give students more access to the schools they want. But Democrats and some moderate Republicans say it will take millions of dollars away from public schools to subsidize private and religious education for some families that might already be able to afford it.
Since its passage, there have been unanswered questions about how the expansion will be implemented. The Arizona Republic sought to answer them, but in some instances, state officials said they can’t fully explain how the program will be implemented because it was advanced by the Legislature and signed into law so quickly.
Here’s what we know at this point.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kd

 

Trump Picks Ex-HP Executive for Top Management Job at Education Department
Education Week

President Donald Trump has announced he will select a former executive for HP Inc., Holly Luong Ham, to serve as assistant secretary for management at the U.S. Department of Education.
An announcement from the Trump administration highlighted her experience as a sales executive at the computer company, which at one time was led by a rival of Trump’s for the presidency in 2016, Carly Fiorina, as well as her experience at the Center for Asian Pacific American Women, a nonprofit group that promotes leadership skills for Asian-American women. The department’s office of management oversees operations and administration at the department.
Ham does not need Senate confirmation to assume the post, the department said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kc

 

‘Rank and file’ educators protest sweeping cuts to APS programs
Albuquerque Journal

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – Former Grant Middle School principal Edgar Briggs has seen failing students turn their lives around thanks to an after-school sports program that may be dropped as a cost-cutting measure.
“There are life-defining aspects to the mentorship they get,” he said. “They build self-discipline, and kids need that foundation.”
On Wednesday, Briggs appealed to the Albuquerque Public Schools Board of Education to save middle school athletics, which currently serves 3,400 kids.
He was one of about 20 teachers, parents, students and administrators who addressed various aspects of the district’s projected $25 million budget reduction during the meeting’s public comment period.
Earlier this month, the board approved a tentative budget proposal that lists a number of unpopular options, including the middle school athletics cut, reduced employee work days, bigger classes and a heavier high school schedule.
The Albuquerque Teachers Federation has taken a strong stand against the schedule change, and its members were out in force Wednesday.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Kb

 

What Does the ‘March for Science’ Mean for STEM Education?
Education Week

Scientists and educators across the country will converge on the National Mall tomorrow for the March for Science, an event meant to highlight the importance of science to society and advocate for evidence-based policymaking.
The march has special relevance for K-12 science teachers, who will be well-represented in Washington and in 374 satellite marches across the country, said David Evans, the executive director of the National Science Teachers Association, which is partnering with the march.
“Teachers are marching because they want the public to recognize that science is important,” said Evans, whose organization has 55,000 members. “Science is important to our life; science is important to our governance.”
The day’s schedule kicks off with a rally and series of teach-ins around the National Mall, and culminates in a 2 p.m. march from the Washington Monument to the U.S. Capitol.
The march is billed as nonpartisan, and the organizers say that it is meant to counter efforts to discredit and restrict scientific discovery, not to promote any particular ideology. One of the march’s core principles, though, is supporting funding for scientific research and education programs that Evans says are in jeopardy because of President Trump’s proposed budget cuts.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KE

 

How Hedge Fund Billionaire James Simons Is Changing Math Education
Forbes

Before Renaissance Technologies founder James Simons became a hedge fund billionaire, he taught math.
Now, Simons, who has an estimated net worth of $18 billion, is supporting math education through the National Math Festival on Saturday April 22 in Washington, DC. The one-day event will have interactive math-themed activities, film screenings of movies such as “Hidden Figures” and talks with professors on topics like the math of DNA, the Zika virus and athletics. When it was last held in 2015 about 20,000 people came.
The lead financial sponsor of the festival is the Simons Foundation, which Simons started in 1994 to focus on scientific research. Simons is also the founder of Math For America, a program for STEM teachers to receive better training and higher pay, and he’s provided funding for the National Museum of Mathematics in New York, which will also be represented at the festival.
Simons is a Massachusetts Institute of Technology and UC Berkeley grad, who was a codebreaker for the U.S. during the Vietnam War, and later chaired and rebuilt the math department at Stony Brook University. He eventually founded Renaissance in 1982 using computer modeling to spot inefficiencies in highly liquid securities. The fund now manages some $36 billion. Simons and his wife Marilyn have been on FORBES’ list of America’s 50 Top Givers, and he has donated some $2.1 billion to charity over his life.
FORBES spoke with Simons to discuss his own passion for math education and philanthropy.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KK

 

How Many States Are Following Federal Restraint and Seclusion Guidelines?
Education Week

Students with disabilities represent 12 percent of all students, but 67 percent of students who are restrained or secluded. But while federal policy governs many aspects of how to educate students in special education, there’s no similar mandate governing the use of restraint and seclusion.
The closest that lawmakers came was in 2010, when the House of Representatives passed federal restrictions, but the bill ultimately died in the Senate.
That wasn’t the last the federal government had to say on the matter, however. Though it doesn’t have the force of law, the U.S. Department of Education in 2012 released “Restraint and Seclusion: Resource Document,” in which it outlined 15 principles that states should consider using when creating their own policies and procedures.
A recent analysis of state laws that was published in the Journal of Disability Studies shows that states have indeed used the resource document as a guide for state law, as the Education Department intended.
But the analysis, published in March, also shows that states have adopted the 15 principles unevenly, and some of them have been included in state law more than others.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KG

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KH (Journal of Disability Policy Studies) $

 

More teen knowledge about concussion may not increase reporting
Reuters

High school athletes with access to a certified athletic trainer are more knowledgeable about concussions and their consequences, but that doesn’t make them more likely to report a concussion, a U.S. study finds.
“The underreporting of concussions is estimated to be high, and the No. 1 reason athletes do not report a concussion is because they do not want to lose playing time,” lead study author Jessica Wallace of Youngstown State University in Ohio said by email.
Although experts estimate that athletic trainers are present in 86 percent of U.S. high schools, only about 37 percent of high schools employ one full-time. In high schools with no athletic trainer, athletes are five times more likely to not report concussion symptoms because they didn’t know they had a concussion, Wallace told Reuters Health.
Sports-related concussions account for about 4 percent to 9 percent of high school injuries and have symptoms such as headaches, confusion, nausea, amnesia and trouble sleeping.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KC

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9KD (Journal of Athletic Training)

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

April 21:

Utah State Board of Education Law and Licensing Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

Utah State Board of Education Finance Committee meeting
1 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

April 26:

Utah State Board of Education Standards and Assessment Committee meeting
9:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 4:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

May 16:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

May 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., TBD
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=INTEDU

June 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

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