Education News Roundup: April 25, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Education News Roundup_"Playground Slide" by cryptic_star/flickr

“Playground Slide” by cryptic_star/flickr

Audit finds problems in Utah’s dual immersion program.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LQ (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9LT (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9LU (UP)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9MQ (AP via CVD)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9LR (KUTV)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mg (KTVX)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9ML (AP via USN&WR)
or a copy of the audit
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LS (Utah Auditor’s Office)

Utah Department of Health looks at playground injuries.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LW (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9MW (AP via CVD)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9Md (KUTV)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mk (KTVX)
or a copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LX (Utah Department of Health)

San Juan District is trying to figure out how best to attract and keep teachers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ln (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9M3 (AP via OSE)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mc (AP via KUTV)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9MK (AP via Grand Junction [CO] Daily Sentinel)

New report finds Utah students have the lowest FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) application rates in the country.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MN (Ed Week)
or a copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MO (National College Access Network)

The latest USN&WR high school rankings are out.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9M4 (PDH)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9M5 (USN&WR)
or just the Utah rankings
http://gousoe.uen.org/9M6 (USN&WR)

Secretary DeVos says Common Core is no more.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LK (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9LL (Fox) video
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9LN (Washington Times)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9MF (Breitbart)

Whatever the results, you’ve gotta give the kid points for trying: “7-year-old fakes note from school saying he needs to play more video games”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MU (NBC Today Show)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9MV (DN)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Audit dings Utah’s dual-immersion program for mismanagement of federal funds
$1.3 million for language immersion program was mishandled through poor oversight, probe says.

About 1,700 Utah elementary students injured yearly on school playgrounds, study says
Over three years, enough students were injured annually to fill 24 school buses.

Wanted: Effective, veteran teachers willing to relocate to San Juan County

Teachers sign off on salary changes ahead of votes in Salt Lake County
Midcareer educators who worry they would lose money under the changes to be voted on Tuesday may have the option to remain in the status quo.

Pathways program connects high school grads with high-tech jobs

After-school programs make a difference for kids, community, group says

Survey to gather input on course credit requirements in Utah

Senator Hillyard: Education fared well during 2017 Legislative Session

Governor appoints new member to State Charter School Board

District 15 Rep. Michelle Boulter to discuss state of education in Utah

Where Students Need Financial Aid the Most, Fewer Apply, Study Finds

Almost Half of Latino Children Live in States that Spend Less Per Child

Local school recognized in annual best schools rankings

Valuable painting missing from Provo school found in Springville museum

Why Utah school buses have more added cameras and monitors to keep an eye on students

Teacher arrested on student relationship charge

Granite school bus sustains minor damage in crash, no students injured

Pleasant Grove school starts food pantry to better serve needs of students

Ogden’s T.O. Smith Elementary presents dual-language ‘Wizard of Oz’

T.H. Bell Junior High authors write novella

4 Ogden School District administrators move into different roles

Northern Utah coaching icon Neville Peterman dies at 73

Logan High rededicates Memorial Bridge

Seniors share time, experience as Head Start volunteers

Volunteers, Fidelity employees help revitalize Utah’s oldest school

7-year-old fakes note from school saying he needs to play more video games

Arby’s Pinpoint Weather Kids: Sandy Elementary

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Who deserves praise and criticism this week in Northern Utah?

Modern society demands excellence in education

Utah is the place to do business

Measure learning differently to dramatically increase student achievement

Attention Utah education leaders: Competency-Based Education Exploratory Team applications now available

Let the teachers teach

Protect our children from bigotry

Want a Formula for Success? Study Utah

Building an Education Marketplace
States face high stakes to avoid the perils and deliver the promise of education savings accounts for school choice.

End of Public Education

NATION

DeVos Tells Fox News: ‘There Isn’t Really Any Common Core Any More’

Ousted Over Sexual Misconduct Claims, and On to the Next Teaching Job

1 in 8 children in California schools have an undocumented parent

A staggering number of NYC public school kids are homeless

Here’s What the U.S. Can Learn About Teaching Quality From Top Countries

Nation’s Report Card Finds Mixed Grades For U.S. Students In Visual Arts, Music

Audit: Weak Accounting Let Mississippi Misspend Federal Cash
Auditors say accounting weaknesses at the Mississippi Department of Education allowed an employee to improperly divert millions of federal dollars, causing the state to slash after-school grants to repay the misspent money.

San Diego schools criticized for effort against Islamophobia

When Preschool Happens at Home
A program in Boston helps new parents find solace.

Mayor Proposes Free, Full-day Pre-K for All NYC 3-year-olds

Summit student faces rape allegation
Federal complaint for $2.5M alleges abuse of a vulnerable person

Overcoming Opioids: Special Schools Help Teens Stay Clean

Microsoft Plans Chromebook Killer for Education Market

 

————————————————————
UTAH NEWS
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Audit dings Utah’s dual-immersion program for mismanagement of federal funds
$1.3 million for language immersion program was mishandled through poor oversight, probe says.

Between 2013 and 2017, the Utah Board of Education potentially mishandled more than $1 million in federal funding for the state’s Dual Language Immersion program, according to a report released Monday by Utah State Auditor John Dougall.
The funding, which Utah received through the Flagship and STARTALK grant programs, lacked adequate oversight, Dougall said, while the structure of the dual immersion program led to inappropriate compensation and payments between administrators at the state and school district levels.
Monday’s audit was requested by the Utah Board of Education, Dougall said, after accounting and reporting errors were noted by board staff.
“The whole arrangement was sloppy,” Dougall said. “Rules weren’t followed.”
Monday’s report highlights several lapses by the Dual Language Immersion program manager, who is not named in the audit. Funding was awarded to school districts without required oversight by state education managers, procurement and hiring procedures were circumvented, and purchases and compensation were carried out without proper documentation.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LQ (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9LT (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9LU (UP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9MQ (AP via CVD)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9LR (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mg (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9ML (AP via USN&WR)

A copy of the audit
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LS (Utah Auditor’s Office)

 

About 1,700 Utah elementary students injured yearly on school playgrounds, study says
Over three years, enough students were injured annually to fill 24 school buses.

A new study from the Utah Department of Health showed that about 5,100 elementary school students in the state were injured on school playgrounds over a three school-year period.
Nearly two-thirds of students in kindergarten through sixth grade who experienced injuries at school from mid-2012 to mid-2015 were hurt on school playgrounds, the study found. The yearly tally of students injured over that time – 1,700 students – is enough students to fill 24 school buses.
The Utah Department of Health has tracked school playground injuries for more than 30 years, said Hillary Campbell, a student-injury reporting technician. Clumsiness and using equipment in ways other than intended by equipment designers accounted for a majority of accidents.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LW (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9MW (AP via CVD)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Md (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mk (KTVX)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LX (Utah Department of Health)

 

Wanted: Effective, veteran teachers willing to relocate to San Juan County

ANETH, San Juan County – Their commute starts before sunrise, and much of the year they get home at dusk or as night falls.
While on the job, teachers at Montezuma Creek Elementary School face working conditions to which most public school teachers in Utah would be completely unaccustomed.
The school, near Four Corners, is remote and in an area that struggles with extreme poverty, high rates of absenteeism, homelessness, substance use disorders and frequent turnover of teachers.
In San Juan County’s communities to the north – Blanding, Monticello and La Sal – about half of the district’s teachers have been in the classroom 14-plus years, said Ron Nielson, elementary supervisor for the San Juan School District.
“Down south at Montezuma Creek, Tse’bii’nidzisgai Elementary and at Bluff, the average at those three schools is 7 percent of our teachers have been in the classroom 14-plus years,” Nielson said.
“It didn’t take a lot of real deep analysis to realize we had a retention problem and even to some degree attracting the right talent.”
In an effort to stem turnover and improve academic achievement, the school district three years ago launched a pilot project to pay significantly higher salaries to effective veteran educators selected as lead teachers at Montezuma Creek Elementary School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ln (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9M3 (AP via OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mc (AP via KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9MK (AP via Grand Junction [CO] Daily Sentinel)

 

Teachers sign off on salary changes ahead of votes in Salt Lake County
Midcareer educators who worry they would lose money under the changes to be voted on Tuesday may have the option to remain in the status quo.

Teachers in Jordan School District will have a choice between old and new after the district’s school board votes on a major overhaul of its salary system Tuesday.
The option for teachers to remain in the status quo was announced Friday in response to midcareer educators who say proposed salary changes would hurt their wallets over time.
“We did not want teachers to feel anxious about what was going to happen,” said Janice Voorhies, president of the Jordan Board of Education.
Voorhies said the board plans to move forward with its changes, which would lift the district’s starting salary to $40,000 and offer across-the-board raises. The proposal would also end the practice of capping pay raises after 15 years in exchange for smaller annual salary increases – known as “steps.”
The proposal was accepted last week by the Jordan Education Association, union President Vicki Olsen said, despite reservations by some members.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lf (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ly (KUER)

 

Pathways program connects high school grads with high-tech jobs

SALT LAKE CITY – Much has been made recently about unmet job demand in Utah and across the country, being the direct result of a workforce that simply doesn’t have the skills to engage the employment opportunities available.
Now, thanks to a program launched under Gov. Gary Herbert’s Talent Ready Utah effort, a small but growing number of Utah students are getting trained for and connected with job placements in advanced industry companies directly out of high school.
And it’s an effort that’s become the envy of the country.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lk (DN)

 

After-school programs make a difference for kids, community, group says

SOUTH SALT LAKE – A group of young violinists kicked off a summit on after-school programs Friday with a fine rendition of the national anthem.
Appropriately, the American Preparatory Academy students learned to play the difficult instrument in an after-school program.
The Utah Afterschool Network and Salt Lake Afterschool Regional Network brought about 100 educators, business leaders and local politicians together at the Columbus Community Center to talk about the need for investing in after-school programs in Salt Lake County.
“It’s really a low-cost way for kids to be able to stay engaged during those critical after-school hours, but also learn to be better citizens,” said Kelly Riding, Utah Afterschool Network executive director.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lm (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9LE (DN via KSL)

 

Survey to gather input on course credit requirements in Utah

SALT LAKE CITY – Members of the public are invited to take a short survey conducted by the Utah State Board of Education in regard to course credit requirements for seventh through 12th grades.
The survey can be accessed at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/UtahCourseCreditRequirements until April 28.
“We are ultimately looking for new ways to promote each student’s academic success,” Laura Belnap, the task force’s chairwoman, said in a statement. “We are looking for ways to build upon Utah’s public education system and provide an opportunity for each student to thrive. Doing what is in the best interest of students can only be accomplished through community engagement.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lp (DN)

 

Senator Hillyard: Education fared well during 2017 Legislative Session

He admits it wasn’t perfect, but Republican State Senator Lyle Hillyard said he believes education fared pretty well during the latest session of the Utah State Legislature. However, he said more needs to be done and he’ll be working on the issue during the summer recess. Hillyard said legislators have traditionally met on one Wednesday during the summer months, but it’s been decided to meet on a Tuesday as well this year. Hillyard outlined several topics that need to be addressed.
“For example, we really need to get a better approach on how we’re using technology,” he said. “I think there’s a lot of things that we may be getting as a state that local school districts just don’t understand or don’t have buy-in to them, and there’s got to be a better relationship there. We’re also looking at funding the WPU [the Weighted Pupil Unit], whether that should all be what we call above the line so it all can be handled more broadly or specifically.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ma (CVD)

 

Governor appoints new member to State Charter School Board

SALT LAKE CITY – Gov. Gary Herbert has appointed Cynthia K. Phillips, executive director of Park City’s Weilenmann School of Discovery, to the State Charter School Board.
In addition to her work with Weilenmann, Phillips is a doctoral candidate in comparative languages and cultural studies at the University of Utah and has taught at Waterford School and Weilenmann.
Phillips replaces Robert Enger, who resigned from the board in March.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LA (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9MM (UP)

 

District 15 Rep. Michelle Boulter to discuss state of education in Utah

ST. GEORGE – Dixie Republican Forum invites the public to hear Michelle Boulter, board of education representative for much of Washington and Iron counties, discuss the state of education in Utah and her service to date at a free forum Wednesday night in St. George.
The forum begins at 7 p.m. in the Washington County Commission Chambers, 197 E. Tabernacle, St. George.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lx (SGN)

 

Where Students Need Financial Aid the Most, Fewer Apply, Study Finds

In school districts where students have the greatest need for financial aid, fewer students apply than in wealthier districts where students need it less.
That’s the finding from the first national study to examine the correlation between a school district’s wealth and its FAFSA application rate. The poorer the school district, the less likely students are to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid.
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh conducted the research for the National College Access Network, using district-level FAFSA completion data the U.S. Department of Education made available last June. They examined the districts state by state, and found that in most states, the higher a district’s poverty rate, the lower its FAFSA completion rate.
Each 10-percentage-point increase in a district’s poverty rate tends to be accompanied by a 3-percentage-point decline in its FAFSA completion rate, the study found.
Some states proved to be exceptions to the rule.
Tennessee topped the list of states with consistently high FAFSA completion rates across various levels of district poverty, and still maintained a relatively narrow gap (8 points) between the completion rates in the wealthier and less-wealthy districts. Some states had smaller gaps, but lower overall FAFSA completion rates.
A few states showed a positive, but weak, relationship between high rates of poverty and higher rates of FAFSA completion. In one state, Utah, there was a strong relationship between FAFSA filing rates and high rates of poverty, but Utah is also the state with the lowest FAFSA-filing rate in the country. In Oregon and California, there appeared to be no relationship between the rates of district poverty and FAFSA completion.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MN (Ed Week)

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MO (National College Access Network)

 

Almost Half of Latino Children Live in States that Spend Less Per Child

Almost half of Latino children in the U.S. are living in states, in the South and West, that are considered “low spending,” and it’s negatively impacting their educational and health incomes, according to a report released by the nonprofit Urban Institute on Tuesday.
The study found “substantial differences” in how much states spend on children and it’s based on geographic factors. The majority of states spending $10,000 or more per child are located in the Northeast while those spending $7,000 or less are found in the South and West. For instance, the highest spending state, which is Vermont, spent $13,430 per child in 2013, which is almost three times more than Utah, which spent $4,590.
Only less than one-fourth of Latino kids live in states that spend a minimum of $8,000 per child.
“Spending differences may contribute to differences in child outcomes among racial/ethnic groups,” states the report.
The study looked at 2013 data and examined how much states spent on children in the areas of education, health, income security and social services spending.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MS (NBC)

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MT (Urban Institute)

 

Local school recognized in annual best schools rankings

A handful of Utah County schools are being recognized as some of the best in the state and nation.
The U.S. News & World Report on Tuesday released its 2017 Best High School Rankings, which have lists that include the best schools in the nation and state; best schools for science, technology, engineering and math; and the nation’s best charter schools.
High schools could win gold, silver or bronze medals at the state level based on factors such as participation and passing scores on Advanced Placement tests, results for statewide tests and graduation rates.
Karl G. Maeser Preparatory Academy, a public charter school in Lindon, was the only Utah County school to receive a gold award. The school was also recognized as one of the best charter schools in the country, coming in at 69th on the list, up from 118th place last year.
Timpanogos High School in Orem, Timpview High School in Provo and Mountain View High School in Orem received silver awards.
Utah was ranked in 14th place on the list for its proportion of schools with gold or silver awards. Of 136 eligible high schools in Utah, three received gold awards, 18 received silver awards and two received bronze awards.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9M4 (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9M5 (USN&WR)

Utah rankings
http://gousoe.uen.org/9M6 (USN&WR)

Valuable painting missing from Provo school found in Springville museum

Provo City School District’s most valuable painting has been found.
“Terraces of Gold,” a painting by James T. Harwood, has been located at the Springville Museum of Art. It’s been cleaned, framed, was previously circulated around and is now being stored at the museum.
For now, it’s going to stay there.
“We aren’t in the business of being art curators,” said Christine Durst, the district media coordinator for Provo City School District who has taken up the responsibility of handling the district’s art collection. “It’s in good hands and they are taking good care of it.”
The painting had previously been listed as missing on the district’s art inventory. An article published in December in the Daily Herald highlighted the painting as one of more than 30 pieces of art the district had listed as missing. At the time, the district suspected the missing artwork wasn’t intentionally stolen, but that paintings had gone missing as staff retired and principals gifted them with a piece of art.
After the article was published, Durst said retired employees contacted the district to tell them the painting was on permanent loan to the Springville Museum of Art.
Most of the artwork listed as missing has since been found – including another district-owned painting at the museum that Provo City School District didn’t have listed in its inventory.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lt (PDH)

 

Why Utah school buses have more added cameras and monitors to keep an eye on students

The fight between two middle school boys was captured on video showing one boy repeatedly punching another student cornered in his seat and kicking back in self-defense.
According to research on bullying, fights breaking out on school buses is not unusual, particularly among boys. But what was different in last year’s brawl on a bus in Tennessee was the recording was made by a student, not a camera that many school districts across the country install to prevent bullying on buses.
A 2015 study conducted by Seon demonstrated video surveillance to be the most popular and effective way to combat school bullying in the U.S. and Canada. Sixty-three percent of surveyed schools reported that bus cameras are the most effective anti-bullying tool.
But some advocates contend more effective prevention is providing resources to help identify problems and intervene early so that fights and other abuse among students don’t happen.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lj (DN)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9M8 (Seon)

Teacher arrested on student relationship charge

A Hurricane High School teacher accused of having an inappropriate relationship with a student has been charged with a felony in relation to nude photos he allegedly obtained from the teen.
Aaron Karl Esplin, 40, of Hurricane was arrested Thursday after school administrators reported they had received information Esplin violated his professional responsibilities toward a 17-year-old female, according to Hurricane City Public Information Officer Tiffany Mower.
A probable cause statement filed Friday with 5th District Court noted a student told the principal about the alleged relationship. An investigating school resource officer spoke with the girl who has allegedly been involved with Esplin, and she “admitted to having a relationship with the teacher and having sent photographs to the teacher of herself naked from her phone to his phone via snapchat,” the report states.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lw (SGS)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9LF (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lz (KNRS)

 

Granite school bus sustains minor damage in crash, no students injured

A bus carrying students from Granite Park Junior High was part of a “minor” crash Monday, and no one was injured.
The crash occurred about 3:15 p.m. near 3300 South and 700 West in South Salt Lake, according to a tweet from Granite School District. The bus sustained minor damage, the district said, and a new bus was on its way to pick up students by 3:30 p.m.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LY (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9M0 (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Me (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mh (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mn (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mp (KSTU)

 

Pleasant Grove school starts food pantry to better serve needs of students

Room 115 of Pleasant Grove’s Grovecrest Elementary was originally designed to be an office.
But that office has taken on a new purpose and serves as the Principal’s Pantry, a place where students who need a little extra assistance can get food for the days they aren’t in school.
Ryan Green, a fifth-grade teacher at the school, said he started the pantry in mid-November to help children that weren’t getting enough to eat.
“If your basic needs aren’t met, you aren’t interested in dividing fractions,” Green said. “That is what I was thinking (when starting the pantry). At least I know (now) they are coming with full bellies. I can’t make them go to bed on time and I can’t make them eat, but I know they aren’t starving.”
The food pantry, which runs entirely on donations and time Green volunteers, works based on referrals from teachers. When they notice a student they think might need extra assistance, Green sends a paper home to their parents.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lu (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mo (KSTU)

 

Ogden’s T.O. Smith Elementary presents dual-language ‘Wizard of Oz’

OGDEN – It was dress rehearsal in the gym at T.O Smith Elementary School and a hesitant pair of apple trees stood onstage next to Dorothy, Toto and the Scarecrow.
“Throw the apples!” teacher and director Amy Dunn said. “Go ahead, throw them!”
The two little trees pulled Styrofoam apples that were attached to their shirts with Velcro and tossed them softly at their classmates.
It could have been any “The Wizard of Oz” production, but it wasn’t – the Cowardly Lion, the Tin Man and the Scarecrow all spoke Spanish.
Dunn said this is the first time T.O. Smith is putting on a dual-language play. The school is one of four in the Ogden School District that offer a Dual Language Immersion program.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9M1 (OSE)

 

T.H. Bell Junior High authors write novella

The young authors club at T.H. Bell Junior High has gone way beyond “It was a dark and stormy night.”
This year, members of the club have written and published a book with local author Joy Spraycar that showcases their writing journey over the past year.
“I was excited to write a book,” said Sarandon Doutre, one of the young authors who worked on the project. “When I was little, I wanted to make a mark on the world somehow, and this is some way to be remembered.”
The 135-page novella, “Betrayed,” is a science-fiction love story that combines action and mystery as the main characters, Valcor and Loreen, try to fulfill their opposing missions. Valcor is on a mission to take Earth girls back to his planet and set himself up to become the next president of Dactilt. Loreen has been banished to Earth, waiting to redeem herself.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lr (OSE)

 

4 Ogden School District administrators move into different roles

OGDEN – Several Ogden School District administrators are moving into different positions, effective July 1.
The changes were announced by Superintendent Sandy Coroles at a Board of Education meeting Thursday, April 20.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ls (OSE)

 

Northern Utah coaching icon Neville Peterman dies at 73

ROY – By all accounts, Neville Peterman was a great track and field coach.
But those who knew him best say he was an even better human being.
Peterman died last week, succumbing to a yearslong fight against deteriorating health. He was 73.
For 31 years, the Canada native taught special education and coached track and field at Bonneville and Roy high schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9M2 (OSE)

 

Logan High rededicates Memorial Bridge

As Logan High turns 100 years old, the deep history of traditions and the sacrifice of its students were remembered in a rededication ceremony of Memorial Bridge on Friday night.
The collection of plaques on Memorial Bridge honors the 1,400 Logan High students who served in World War II, especially the 46 who lost their lives, as well as five who died in the Korean War and three who made the ultimate sacrifice in the Vietnam War. The bridge was built in 1950, improved in 1993 and rededicated in 2002. With a renovation this summer, pavers will be sold to include names and graduating years of students.
Student Body President Alex Lambert made a few remarks at the ceremony before introducing Logan Mayor Craig Petersen. He said it’s hard to look at the list of names on the plaques and not feel a sense of reverence
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lv (LHJ)

 

Seniors share time, experience as Head Start volunteers

SOUTH SALT LAKE – Each morning that Janice Jenkins walks into her classroom, she braces herself as 17 preschoolers swarm her with hugs.
Jenkins, 70, is a Senior Corps volunteer and participant in the Foster Grandparents program. She donates her time and energy to the Head Start preschool at 2825 S. 200 East, assisting the classroom’s teacher and imparting wisdom to the young students.
“I love working with children,” she said. “I did not know that I could after I raised my own. The literacy that we teach to them makes it such a thrill.”
On Monday, Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams encouraged senior citizens in the community to join the county’s Senior Corps, where they can participate in programs such as Foster Grandparents, Meals on Wheels and even ride-sharing.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lo (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9LD (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mm (DN via KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ms (KUER)

 

Volunteers, Fidelity employees help revitalize Utah’s oldest school

SALT LAKE CITY – Fourteen-year-old Celeste Litchfield said she feels right at home walking through the halls at West High School, even though she’s only in eighth grade.
And she notices the finishing touches, saying that they help the really old building feel nice.
“I remember thinking when school started that the sayings on the walls were really cool,” Celeste said. “It’s nice to have good things to look at.”
The inspirational quotes, at least 22 of them, that now adorn the tall concrete walls at the 127-year-old school were put there by Fidelity Investments of Utah employees on Saturday, along with a couple dozen high school and university students who wanted to help. The volunteers returned to the school this year after making some much-needed enhancements last year, as well.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ll (DN)

 

7-year-old fakes note from school saying he needs to play more video games

One boy in Utah hatched a hilarious plan to get more video game time at home.
When Lori Anderson of Eagle Mountain, Utah, read a note from her son’s “school” one day, she nearly burst out laughing. While it was a very serious-sounding letter, it appeared as though her 7-year-old son, Nathan, had forged it on a 5-by-7-inch piece of loose-leaf paper.
Maybe it was the handwriting that gave it away, or perhaps the fact that it said he was “doing good” in all his classes except for – wait for it – video game class. The ultimate warning? “If he does not stay up all night and practice video games, he will get kicked out of school!!!” the letter read.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MU (NBC Today Show)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9MV (DN)

 

Arby’s Pinpoint Weather Kids: Sandy Elementary

Chief Meteorologist Dan Pope caught up with his friends from Sandy Elementary School at the Arby’s located at 129 West 900 South in Sandy. They helped him deliver the Pinpoint Weather forecast.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mj (KTVX)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Who deserves praise and criticism this week in Northern Utah?
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

The Standard-Examiner Editorial Board hashes out the positions we take on the Opinion page. Here’s what members recommended last week for praise and criticism:
THUMBS DOWN: To Girls State for adopting a sexist dress code.
The American Legion Auxiliary of Utah now requires girls to wear dresses or blouses with skirts throughout most of the Girls State program. Pants or pantsuits are banned.
Girls State and Boys State, held in separate locations, are summer leadership and citizenship programs to teach students about state-level civics and teamwork.
There has been no explanation for the change in policy. Meanwhile the boys’ only requirements stipulate a single day of business casual attire.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lq

 

Modern society demands excellence in education
Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Ron Jibson, recently retired chairman and CEO of Questar and co-chair of Our Schools Now

Our Schools Now has created a buzz in Utah not just about education funding, but also tax policy. Regrettably, some have become focused on tax structure while overlooking the overwhelming evidence that calls for additional investment in education. As this initiative moves forward, we cannot afford to forget what’s at stake.
First, student achievement in Utah currently falls short. By multiple measures, thousands of students are not receiving the education necessary to be successful in the 21st century. End of year testing for elementary students? In every assessed subject – math, science and English – more than 50 percent of Utah students are not proficient. That’s roughly 200,000 students. ACT tests in high school? Widely recognized as a standard of college and career readiness, it’s evident our kids aren’t sufficiently prepared for post-high school pursuits: 67 percent do not meet the ACT science benchmark, 66 percent do not meet the ACT math benchmark, 56 percent fall short of the ACT reading benchmark, and 41 percent fail to reach the ACT English benchmark. Sadly, education in the U.S. is deteriorating to such low levels that some are willing to accept these results as adequate. Should we be satisfied by simply scoring better than poor performing states? I don’t think so.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Li

Utah is the place to do business
Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Theresa Foxley, president and CEO of the Economic Development Corporation of Utah, Lane Beattie, president and CEO of the Salt Lake Chamber, and Val Hale, executive director of the Governor’s Office of Economic Development

Utah’s growing reputation as a premier business destination is gaining traction. This week the Beehive State is playing host to some of our nation’s top site selectors and consultants at the Business Facilities LiveXchange in Park City.
Many Utahns likely do not understand that these folks are critical stakeholders behind the decisions that help bring new jobs to our community and keep our state competitive. While we hope the attendees will enjoy Utah’s unrivaled quality of life in scenic Park City, we have to take this opportunity to share why they shouldn’t just bring a conference here, but their next company or expansion opportunity.
Utah has built a model for corporate recruitment in partnership with many of the attendees to the event, and we are always looking to improve. This starts with Gov. Gary Herbert’s recent announcement of the “Utah Business Promise,” the state’s commitment to a business-friendly environment and high quality of life. While some state’s marketing might get ahead of product development, in Utah, we deliver on our commitments. Take the following into consideration:

* Educated workforce: Utah’s nation-leading population growth builds on a burgeoning talent pool of an educated and prepared workforce ready to meet industry needs. For example, 120 languages are spoken in daily commerce in the state, giving the workforce deep cultural insights few states, or even nations, can boast. This comes in addition to Herbert’s new initiative, Talent Ready Utah, which aims to fill 40,000 new high-skill, high-paying jobs through innovative partnerships and work-based learning opportunities to better meet industry needs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MP

Measure learning differently to dramatically increase student achievement
Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Lynn Stoddard, who has 67 years of experience as a teacher, principal and education leader, and Donald Thomas, a retired superintendent of schools

“Not everything that can be counted counts and not everything that counts can be counted.”
– Albert Einstein
The time has come for the state of Utah to establish an education assessment system that measures important attributes of student self-development.
As is well stated by Dr. Arthur Costa, professor emeritus at California State University, Fullerton: “What was once educationally significant, but difficult to measure, has now been replaced by what is insignificant and easy to measure. So now we test how well we have taught what we do not value.”
This is especially true with the use of standardized tests and letter grades for schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lh

Attention Utah education leaders: Competency-Based Education Exploratory Team applications now available
Sutherland Institute commentary by Christine Cooke, education policy analyst

Utah education leaders: Have you heard of “competency-based education”? Are you interested in learning more? Do you want to bring it to your district?
You can now apply to build a Competency-Based Learning Exploratory Team. Teams will learn about competency-based learning through in-state and out-of-state site visits and other resources. Applications are due to Sarah Young, Director for Digital Teaching and Learning at the State Office of Education, by May 15, 2017, by 5 p.m.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mb

 

Let the teachers teach
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Curtis Miller

In regards to the Associated Press article, “Absences, fitness, atmosphere – new ways to track schools,” (The Tribune, April 18).
Looking for new metrics by which to evaluate schools will not “fix” education.
People criticize the use of test scores for school evaluation because tests ignore other dimensions that are important to intellectual development. This leads to students and schools being harmed when they don’t “measure up,” and some going through contortions to game the tests (which are always flawed) to artificially look good.
The solution, though, is not to find a new metric or set of metrics. The problems stem from the use of any metric – be it a test or a Frankenstein’s monster of a composite score – to judge school quality and impose severe consequences on those who, under that lens, look bad. We would be trading one set of horror stories for another set of horror stories.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Lg

 

Protect our children from bigotry
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Stacie Cottrell

Equality Utah applied enough legal pressure to the education system to essentially force it to change discriminatory “no promo-homo” laws.
Suicide is the leading cause of death for our adolescents. Suicide rates in Utah are consistently higher than the national average. Correlative data has demonstrated that LGBTQ youth are at dramatically higher risk for suicide than other groups.
Policies like this are put into place because of the values and beliefs of those who promoted, supported and enacted them.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LZ

 

Want a Formula for Success? Study Utah
Bloomberg commentary by columnist Matthew A. Winkler

A Gallup Poll proved prescient in 2012 when it rated Utah No. 1 among U.S. states in “future livability” based on 13 economic, health and lifestyle measures. Five years later, it’s become the fastest-growing state and enjoys the lowest rate of inequality nationwide.
During the second and third quarters of 2016, Utah’s economy expanded 2.24 percent, almost twice the U.S. rate of growth during the same period, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Only Idaho experienced greater employment growth in 2016, Bloomberg data show.
The Utah boom is partly attributed to its youth: More than 30 percent of the state’s 3 million residents are under 18, compared with 22.9 percent for the U.S. At the other end of the scale, only 10.3 percent are older than 65, as against 15 percent all Americans.
Demographics isn’t Utah’s only advantage. Another is the educational and cultural influence of the Mormon Church, to which 62 percent of state residents belong.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MR

 

Building an Education Marketplace
States face high stakes to avoid the perils and deliver the promise of education savings accounts for school choice.
U.S. News & World Report op-ed by Nat Malkus, a research fellow in education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute

With school choice supporters helming both the White House and the U.S. Department of Education, media attention to school choice has focused on potential changes at the federal level. It’s true that change could come from Washington: Trump could make good on his promise of $20 billion for school choice, or after hearing arguments last week in Trinity Lutheran Church v. Pauley, the Supreme Court could pave the way for more choice programs by ruling that Blaine Amendments, which prohibit state funds from going to religious schools in 37 state constitutions, are unconstitutional. However, the real action to date on school choice has been at the state level, as evidenced with this month’s dramatic expansion of education savings accounts, or ESA, in Arizona.
The first ESA program was established in Arizona in 2011. It places part of the state’s per-pupil education funding into a restricted-use account that parents can spend to customize their child’s education by choosing among education service providers. ESAs circumvent Blaine Amendments because the state does not transfer the funds to schools or education service providers; parents do.
This new school choice mechanism has proven popular since its Arizona debut. Florida, Tennessee, Mississippi and Nevada have since passed ESA programs, and 18 states considered similar legislation in 2017. Nevada’s ESA was the furthest-reaching, offering nearly universal eligibility where other states limited participation to specific subgroups of students. However, in September the state Supreme Court put Nevada’s program on hold until the legislature arranges a dedicated funding stream for it.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MB

End of Public Education
Michigan Radio commentary by columnist JACK LESSENBERRY

When I was a child, there was this widespread quaint notion that children ought to attend the public schools where they lived. Except for a few kids that went to Catholic schools, and one who won a scholarship to Cranbrook, everybody did.
This was a middle-class to working-class suburban Detroit district, virtually all white, in the era shortly before busing was first considered as a remedy for de facto segregation. There were no very rich people, but some doctors and lawyer’s kids did go to school with the children of shop rats and assembly line workers. There was concern about quality, but as far as I remember, nobody talked about pulling their kids out and sending them to a better district.
Charter schools hadn’t been invented. Private schools were not only beyond most people’s means, they seemed somehow vaguely unpatriotic, at least to those of us who grew up on a diet of World War II movies, where O’Malley was in school with Rosenberg and D’Annunzio and Lowell and all four wound up in the same landing craft headed for Okinawa.
There was concern about quality, and conscientious mothers lobbied their neighbors to support proposals raising millage rates.
Property taxes were the main source of school funding before Proposal A came in 1994, and communities had considerable latitude over what they spent. But you wanted a public education, and if your parents moved to a different district, you had to change schools.
Well, we are in a different world, with a bewildering array of options. Some districts have become nightmares that any parent who can is attempting to flee. They often can escape, since for the last twenty years, Michigan has had a Schools of Choice program, which enables parents in dubious districts to shop for better ones.
Not surprisingly, the Grosse Pointe Public Schools are much in demand. For many years, the five Grosse Pointes refused to participate in Schools of Choice. But times change. Even the Pointes have been hit with budget cuts and significantly declining enrollment.
So now the Grosse Pointe Board of Education is considering charging students from outside the district a whopping $13,000 tuition fee. Any student from, say, Detroit who wanted to come there would have to plunk that much down, and have a clean school record and at least a 2.0 grade average. The school board hasn’t definitely decided to do this.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MD

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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DeVos Tells Fox News: ‘There Isn’t Really Any Common Core Any More’
Education Week

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos seems to be indicating that, as far as she’s concerned, the Common Core State Standards aren’t really a big point of discussion in education any longer. But how did she express that idea, and does it hold up to scrutiny?
During a Fox News interview Monday, anchor Bill Hemmer asked DeVos whether the U.S. Department of Education would withhold federal money from states that use the standards.
“The Every Students Succeeds Act … essentially does away with the whole argument about common core,” DeVos responded, adding that the law gives states more flexibility in education policy decisions. She added that she hoped all states in their ESSA plans would include high expectations for students.
But Hemmer pressed her again on the question about withholding federal funds over the common core. DeVos replied, “There isn’t really any common core any more. Each state is able to set the standards for their state. They may elect to adopt very high standards for their students to aspire to and to work toward. And that will be up to each state.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LK

http://gousoe.uen.org/9LL (Fox) video

http://gousoe.uen.org/9LN (Washington Times)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9MF (Breitbart)

 

Ousted Over Sexual Misconduct Claims, and On to the Next Teaching Job
New York Times

For many years, when teachers at private schools were forced out over claims of sexual misconduct, administrators let the accused quietly move on to teach elsewhere. The pattern was so common it earned its own grim moniker: “passing the trash.”
A report released this month by Choate Rosemary Hall, an elite Connecticut boarding school, is filled with instances of men who had been accused of sexually abusing students, yet were allowed to keep teaching. Now accusations have emerged that two of the men may have abused students at other schools.
Two women have come forward to accuse one former teacher, Frederic Lyman – who was forced to leave Choate over claims of sexual misconduct in 1982 – of inappropriate behavior while he was on the faculty at Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass., before he came to Choate.
After leaving Choate with a recommendation, he got a job at a school in Colorado, Kent Denver.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LH

 

1 in 8 children in California schools have an undocumented parent
(Oakland, CA) EdSource

Posing significant challenges for educators, about 1 in 8 students in California schools has at least one parent who is undocumented, according to a new brief from the Education Trust-West.
Undocumented children as well as U.S. citizen children with undocumented relatives have experienced heightened anxieties for several years as a result of deportation policies begun under President George W. Bush and tightened ones under President Barack Obama.
But according to school officials, those anxieties have reached new heights since Donald Trump’s inauguration, with possible consequences on their ability to focus on school work, the willingness of parents to attend school events, or even to bring their children to school.
Education Trust-West, an advocacy organization in Oakland, estimates that 750,000 students in California’s preK-12 schools have an undocumented parent, out of a total enrollment of 6.2 million. Some of these students may be undocumented themselves, but the vast majority of K-12 children with undocumented parents are U.S. citizens.
According to the Ed-Trust West brief, only 240,000 children between 3 and 17-year-olds are undocumented.
These figures do not include most of the teenagers and young adults who have received temporary protection from deportation through the Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals program. By far the majority of the 214,000 young people who were approved are of college-going age.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LO

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LP (Education Trust-West)

 

A staggering number of NYC public school kids are homeless
New York Post

The number of homeless kids enrolled in city schools last year rose by 15 percent from 2013-2014, according to an analysis by the city’s Independent Budget Office.
The IBO found that there were roughly 33,000 kids who spent at least some time at a shelter enrolled in city public schools last year, up 4,000 from the prior year.
The Bronx had the most homeless enrollees, with 13,729, the report found.
Brooklyn was second, with 9,223, followed by Manhattan, with 4,909, Queens, with 3,971, and Staten Island, with 971.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MH

http://gousoe.uen.org/9MI (NYT)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MJ (NYC Independent Budget Office)

 

Here’s What the U.S. Can Learn About Teaching Quality From Top Countries
Education Week

States and districts, plagued with recurring waves of teacher shortages in certain subject areas (namely science, math, and special education), have come up with short-term solutions like hiring teachers with emergency or temporary credentials or using substitutes. Teacher-preparation enrollment numbers have dropped in recent years, and surveys of U.S. teachers show a growing discontentment with the profession.
Is there a better way?
Education researcher Linda Darling-Hammond’s new book, Empowered Educators: How High-Performing Systems Shape Teaching Quality Around the World, is a three-year study into how seven high-performing jurisdictions recruit, develop, and support high-quality teachers. These countries and provinces-Finland; Singapore; the states of New South Wales and Victoria in Australia; the provinces of Alberta and Ontario in Canada; and the province of Shanghai in China-have all focused on building effective teaching systems, instead of short-term fixes, and professionalizing teaching as an occupation.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9M7

 

Nation’s Report Card Finds Mixed Grades For U.S. Students In Visual Arts, Music
NPR

For only the third time ever, the government released today a national report card examining the knowledge, understanding and abilities of U.S. eighth-graders in visual arts and music.
And in many ways, the numbers aren’t great, with little progress shown in most categories since the last time the assessment was given in 2008. One bright spot: The achievement gap between Hispanic students and their white peers has narrowed. But Hispanics and African-Americans still lag far behind white and Asian eighth-graders.
The findings come from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, or NAEP, which regularly reports on U.S. student achievement, including math, reading and science. But only three times – in 1997, 2008 and now from 2016 – has it looked at music and visual arts.
Overall, the national scores on arts achievement remained flat when compared with 2008, said Peggy Carr, the acting commissioner of NAEP. “Granted this is not the best score,” she said, especially when compared with U.S. students’ progress in math. “Math has shown a tremendous improvement.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mq

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mt (AP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9My (Ed Week)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mr (NAEP)

Audit: Weak Accounting Let Mississippi Misspend Federal Cash
Auditors say accounting weaknesses at the Mississippi Department of Education allowed an employee to improperly divert millions of federal dollars, causing the state to slash after-school grants to repay the misspent money.
Associated Press via U.S. News & World Report

JACKSON, Miss.- Auditors say accounting weaknesses at the Mississippi Department of Education allowed an employee to improperly divert millions of federal dollars, causing the state to slash after-school grants to repay the misspent money.
Bill Early, a partner with accounting firm Clifton Larsen Allen, presented the results to the Board of Education Thursday, but copies of the twoaudits weren’t released until Friday. They flagged nine problems, including five classified as material weaknesses, the most severe kind of finding.
State Superintendent Carey Wright said the department is reorganizing its accounting department and fixing the problems. The department fired three employees after problems with the after-school money were discovered.
“We have taken swift action to remedy all deficiencies, including making key personnel changes to ensure strong oversight and to raise the level of accountability,” Wright said in a statement .
She said new Chief Operations Officer Felicia Gavin , who was executive director of the Department of Finance and Administration under Gov. Ronnie Musgrove, as well as a casino executive, has a strong accounting background.
The audit found that a department official improperly diverted $11.5 million from federal anti-poverty grants into the separate federal after-school grant program after the state awarded more grants than it had money for. Two other employees didn’t stop the diversion. Clifton Larsen Allen said higher-level approval should be required for overriding accounting rules, and also said the diversion wouldn’t have lasted four months if the department balanced its books each month.
The snafu had severe consequences for Mississippi students served by the program. The department had originally planned to fund after-school programs for 29,000 students in 67 school districts this year, but had to cut that amount to 7,000 students in 28 districts.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mz

 

San Diego schools criticized for effort against Islamophobia
Fox

One of the nation’s largest school districts has launched a campaign against Islamophobia, drawing praise and criticism.
The San Diego Unified School District’s multiyear plan includes a letter addressing Islamophobia to staff and parents of its 132,000 students. The letter is expected to be drafted and sent before Ramadan begins in late May. The district is also reviewing internal staff calendars to make sure Muslim holidays are recognized.
The plan drew little attention when the board approved it 4-0 on April 4. Public comments from staff and community members were uniformly positive. Pushback gradually spread on the internet and social media, with written attacks on Islam and the Council on American-Islamic Relations.
The San Diego Union-Tribune and The Los Angeles Times both ran articles on the issue. The story was also picked up by Breitbart. The school district is holding a meeting Tuesday night that is expected to draw large crowds.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9MG

 

When Preschool Happens at Home
A program in Boston helps new parents find solace.
Atlantic

Samira Abdulkadir came to the United States 10 years ago, a young bride with a baby boy. She was from Somalia but came to the U.S. by route of Kenya, where she was married. The family settled just outside of Boston, in Chelsea, Massachusetts, and Abdulkadir had more children. Her second child, a girl, was born deaf. Then she had a boy, who died after five months in the hospital. Her next child, another girl, was also deaf-like their father.
When this youngest girl was born without hearing, Abdulkadir drifted toward despair. She spoke very little English, she didn’t have any extended family in the area, she was still grieving the loss of her baby, two out of her three surviving children were deaf, and she said her husband couldn’t share much of the responsibility at home because of his own disability.
MGH Chelsea HealthCare Center referred Abdulkadir to its Healthy Families America home-visiting program. The service is designed to support first-time parents, as well as those raising babies for the first time in the United States. The program offers supports to immigrant families adjusting to U.S. culture and an unfamiliar health-care system until their youngest child turns three. Based on individual needs, MGH home-visitors help connect families to social services, educational opportunities, and medical or mental health care. They also follow an early-childhood curriculum to ensure babies and toddlers meet developmental milestones on time.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9LM

 

Mayor Proposes Free, Full-day Pre-K for All NYC 3-year-olds
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Mayor Bill de Blasio is proposing free, full-day early childhood education for all of New York City’s 3-year-olds by the fall of 2021.
De Blasio said Monday that the city hopes to launch a pilot of the “3-K” program next fall year at a cost of $36 million. But the state and federal governments would have to pitch in.
The cost would rise to $177 million when the program is fully in place.
The pilot program would focus on low-income districts in the South Bronx and Brownville, Brooklyn.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mv

 

Summit student faces rape allegation
Federal complaint for $2.5M alleges abuse of a vulnerable person
(Bend, OR) The Bulletin

Bend-La Pine Schools and one of its students are facing a lawsuit in federal court after an alleged rape during school hours at Summit High School.
Both the victim and her alleged rapist were Summit students who belonged to Tamarack Program, an off-campus facility for students with challenging behaviors and mental health needs.
The mother of the victim filed suit in U.S. District Court late last month and is seeking $2.5 million for personal injury, discrimination in education and abuse of a vulnerable person following the incident, alleged to have occurred Sept. 23, 2015.
The victim was 15 at the time, but the age of her alleged attacker was not revealed in the complaint.
No charges were ever filed by the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office because the victim reported that she never told the suspect “no” and there is school bus video surveillance that took place shortly before the alleged rape that shows the two teenagers kissing in what the DA’s office and Bend Police Department consider consensual.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9M9

Overcoming Opioids: Special Schools Help Teens Stay Clean
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — When Logan Snyder got hooked on pills after a prescription to treat pain from a kidney stone, she joined the millions already swept up in the nation’s grim wave of addiction to opioid painkillers.
She was just 14.
Youth is a drawback when it comes to kicking drugs. Only half of U.S. treatment centers accept teenagers and even fewer offer teen-focused groups or programs. After treatment, adolescents find little structured support. They’re outnumbered by adults at self-help meetings. Sober youth drop-in centers are rare. Returning to school means resisting offers to get high with old friends.
But Snyder is lucky: Her slide ended when her father got her into a residential drug treatment program. Now 17 and clean, she credits her continued success to Hope Academy in Indianapolis, a tuition-free recovery school where she’s enrolled as a junior.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Mx

Microsoft Plans Chromebook Killer for Education Market
Fortune

Microsoft wants more students and teachers to use Windows 10 and related software, but the company needs a better way to get its technology into cash-strapped schools. So the software giant plans to make less expensive hardware available to the education market, according to tech news site Windows Central.
Microsoft’s idea is to help hardware partners build cheaper hardware running Windows 10 for schools.
The goal is to challenge Google Chromebooks, have done extremely well with schools. Microsoft’s existing Surface laptops and tablets have been well reviewed, but they start at $799 for the Surface Pro 4 to $1,499 for the Surface Book without software. Chromebooks, by contrast, can be had for as little as $179, ranging up to $499.
Citing a confidential Microsoft document, Windows Central lists minimum specifications for a new “Cloudbook.” The laptop would run an Intel quad-core processor with 4GB of RAM and 32 GB of storage.
One of the goals for the computer is that it have a battery that lasts all day (there are a limited number of plugs in classrooms, after all). In addition to the usual keyboard , it may also come with the option of a touch screen or the ability to use a stylus to write or enter data directly on the screen.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ME

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

April 26:

Utah State Board of Education Standards and Assessment Committee meeting
9:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 4:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

May 16:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

May 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=INTEDU

June 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

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