Education News Roundup: April 27, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

2017 State Teachers of the Year met with President and Mrs. Trump in the Oval Office on Wednesday. Read more here: http://gousoe.uen.org/9Oa. Photo courtesy CCSSO

Gov. Herbert was in attendance when President Trump signed an order yesterday seeking a review of federal education regulations.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9O4 (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9O6 (NYT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9OB (LAT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9O7 (USAT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9OC (Breitbart)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9O8 (Reuters)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9O9 (AP)
or a copy of the order
http://gousoe.uen.org/9O5 (White House)
or a transcript of President Trump’s remarks
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OF (White House)
or a transcript of Rob Goad phone call on the executive order
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OE (White House)

Ogden School District moves to performance pay for coaches.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Oj (OSE)

Trib follows up on the American Preparatory Academy construction issue in Draper.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OJ (SLT)

2014 Utah Teacher of the Year Allison Riddle discusses after-school programs in Ed Week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OI (Ed Week)

New IES study looks at the Washington, D.C. voucher program and student success.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ov (WaPo)
or a copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ow (Institute of Education Sciences)

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Trump rolls out executive order reviewing federal education rules

Ogden School District approves performance-based bonus pay for coaches

‘House on Mango Street’ author tells Salt Lake elementary students to ‘dream big’

Sky View wins national recognition at We The People championship

Does the U.S. Census undercount Utah Navajos?
San Juan County > New count may complicate court-ordered efforts to redraw voting districts.

New Code.org report offers ways for states to fill computer science teaching gaps
To build a robust computer science teacher workforce, states must create short- and long-term options for potential candidates, the nonprofit says.

Spanish Fork student instrumental in passage of safety bill

States Reconsider Sunscreen as Banned Drug in Schools

Utah school districts work to bring in nations best, brightest educators

Teenager charged with auto homicide in crash that killed two Moab teens
Courts > Driver, 17, suspected of being under the influence.

District: S.L. principal accused of misconduct retires

Utah school district considers cutting ‘unsafe’ bus route

Wasatch Academy sweeps 2017 best of state awards

Holladay Teacher granted 5k for equipment in TV broadcast class
CenturyLink giving out tens of thousands to deserving teachers

Provo School district offers summer access to meals for children

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Take After-School Programs Off the Political Chopping Block

NATION

Nation’s only federally funded voucher program has negative effect on student achievement, study finds

Judge: Mostly white Southern city may secede from school district — even if effort motivated by race

Trump: Nothing More Important Than Being a Teacher

There Are No Quick Fixes for Teacher Shortage, Report Warns

WV Gov. Justice signs bill eliminating RESAs, banning Common Core

Vista district using fingerprint scans for school lunches

District: Star teacher berated kids about ‘animal slaughter’

Education Startup EverFi Raises $190 Million

The ‘X-plan’ and other powerful tools you can provide when talking to your kids about proms and alcohol

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Trump rolls out executive order reviewing federal education rules

SALT LAKE CITY – Gov. Gary Herbert, fresh from attending a signing ceremony of an executive order directing a review of national monument designations, also attended the rollout of a directive to analyze federal education rules impacting states.
Herbert’s day in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday swirled around a theme he has hammered on during his tenure as governor: Vital issues affecting states are best left for states to govern, not some distant government thousands of miles away.
The executive order signed by President Donald Trump directs Education Secretary Betsy DeVos to take the next 300 days to review – and repeal where necessary – federal education rules where the U.S. Department of Education has overstepped its authority.
“This executive order makes certain that local leaders will be making the decisions about what happens in the classroom. Parents will no longer have to worry about the federal government enacting overreaching mandates or requiring states to adopt a federal curriculum at the expense of local education innovation,” said Rob Goad, a senior education department official.
Afterward, Herbert praised the Trump administration’s willingness to engage governors and other local leaders on issues that have direct impact on the lives of everyday Americans.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9O4 (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9O6 (NYT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9OB (LAT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9O7 (USAT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9OC (Breitbart)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9O8 (Reuters)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9O9 (AP)

A copy of the order
http://gousoe.uen.org/9O5 (White House)

Transcript of President Trump’s remarks
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OF (White House)

Transcript of Rob Goad phone call on the executive order
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OE (White House)

 

Ogden School District approves performance-based bonus pay for coaches

OGDEN – Ogden School District coaches and assistant coaches will soon be able to earn bonuses based on their teams’ academic and athletic performance.
Those bonuses can be attained in four areas: team GPA, team attendance, time spent working with feeder programs and on-field success.
The bonus program was implemented to increase student participation, competitiveness, coach retention and quality, and to support the district’s academic and attendance goals, district athletic director Ken Crawford said.
Most of the changes will go into effect in the fall. The district board of education approved the change for high school and junior high coaches at a meeting Thursday, April 20.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Oj (OSE)

 

American Preparatory Academy facing $50,000 deadline as it pushes for traffic access

American Preparatory Academy must resolve its ongoing property dispute before January 1 or pay $50,000 in easement fees, Salt Lake County records show.
The charter school is currently involved in a lawsuit against its southern neighbor, Price Logistics Center Draper, over a narrow strip of land that separates American Preparatory Academy from 11950 South.
That dispute has left American Preparatory Academy functionally landlocked, relying on an easement with The Forest Corporation to allow vehicle traffic to and from the school.
But an easement agreement filed with the Salt Lake County Recorder’s Office in January stipulates that if the lawsuit is not resolved in the school’s favor this year, American Preparatory Academy will owe Forest a one-time payment of $50,000.
The $50,000 lump sum is in addition to monthly payments of $1,000 the school currently pays to use its driveway, which will increase to $3,000 in September, according to the easement agreement.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OJ (SLT)

 

‘House on Mango Street’ author tells Salt Lake elementary students to ‘dream big’

SALT LAKE CITY – Author and National Medal of Arts recipient Sandra Cisneros told fifth-graders at Mountain View Elementary School that they live in a momentous time, but achieving their dreams will take much effort.
“Each one of you is a bridge,” she said. “Each one of you has to step up and be an ambassador at this time. You have to promise me you’ll be ambassadors of peace.”
The students, a majority of whom are native Spanish speakers learning English at the school, have been reading Cisneros’ “The House on Mango Street,” which has sold more than 5 million copies and is acclaimed for its exploration of the lives of the working class.
“Don’t dream little. Dream big,” Cisneros told the students. “Do something every day to walk toward it, even if its something little.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Og (DN)

Sky View wins national recognition at We The People championship

Sky View High is well-known around Utah as the team to beat in the civic debate program We The People, but after a weekend of competitions in Washington, D.C., three Sky View students raised their school’s national profile.
Competing against 1,300 students from 55 teams from all over the country, the Sky View team didn’t rank in the top 10 overall, but seniors Emma Belliston, Carter Martindale and Emma Zook won national recognition in the unit on the Bill of Rights.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Om (LHJ)

 

Does the U.S. Census undercount Utah Navajos?
San Juan County > New count may complicate court-ordered efforts to redraw voting districts.

Demographers puzzled by last month’s U.S. Census update showing that Utah’s San Juan County is the nation’s fast growing are now throwing doubt on the surprise findings, arguing that the census is probably now recording Navajo residents who have not been captured in past surveys.
Evidence suggests that San Juan is home to many more American Indians than officially recognized, which could hold huge political and funding implications for the state’s poorest county.
In March, the Census Bureau released adjustments showing that the population of the southeastern Utah county, home to the new and controversial Bears Ears National Monument, grew by nearly 1,200 people in 2016, indicating an improbable growth rate of 7.6 percent.
What changed was not so much the number of people calling San Juan home, but as how Navajos who live in remote areas near the Arizona state line were counted, according to Pam Perlich, director of demographic research at the U.’s Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute.
If true, the effects could be immense for the sparsely populated corner of Utah where a federal court has ordered county officials to redraw voting districts.
“A whole host of federal moneys are directed to counties linked to these numbers. Every person not enumerated costs the county thousands of dollars,” said Perlich in a phone interview from Chicago where she presented her findings Tuesday.
“If you don’t enumerate the populations, you aren’t going to have the political representation, you don’t have the funding, and you don’t have the data to do proper planning,” Perlich said. “This is an important issue for San Juan County and our Native populations.”
Last month’s census report indicated San Juan’s alleged growth stemmed from net in-migration of 1,050 new residents, bringing its population to 16,895.
But Perlich and others, including Debbie Hatt of the Southeastern Utah Association of Local Governments, could find no evidence of such growth. School enrollment, church membership rolls and housing stocks were pretty flat.
“We are not seeing more kids on the buses, anything like that,” Hatt said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OH (SLT)

 

New Code.org report offers ways for states to fill computer science teaching gaps
To build a robust computer science teacher workforce, states must create short- and long-term options for potential candidates, the nonprofit says.

States should create opportunities and certification paths for teachers to ensure that computer science is a subject taught in every K-12 school, according to a new report from Code.org.
According to the recently released report, states should develop “multi-pronged approaches” to prepare and license a new generation of computer science teachers. All states deal with teacher certification differently, but they should “create pathways that align with their existing preservice teacher preparation, certification, and endorsement pathways,” according to the report.
Currently, just 29 states offer clear pathways for computer science teachers, and there is a lack of clear and consistent rules and policies that teachers must follow from state to state to receive full certification to teach the subject – in much higher demand now than it was several years ago.
The paper lays out what should be done in the short and long terms, as well as right now, in order to guarantee that there will be enough computer science and programming teachers to fill the schools that need them. The authors highlight Arkansas and Utah as model examples of certification procedures and outcomes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OM ([Washington, DC] EdScoop)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ON (Code.org)

 

Spanish Fork student instrumental in passage of safety bill

Nebo School District Superintendent Rick Nielsen; Rep. Mike McKell, R-Spanish Fork; and Nebo student Reed Heywood, from Spanish Fork High, met with Gov. Gary Herbert at the ceremonial bill signing for H.B. 235, Automated Traffic Enforcement Safety Devices.
This bill authorizes the use of an automated traffic enforcement safety device on a school bus to capture a photograph or video image of a possible violation of certain traffic laws; authorizes the use of a photograph or video image obtained by an automated traffic enforcement safety device as evidence of certain traffic violations and provides for a portion of fines collected for certain traffic violations related to school buses to be allocated to offset costs of an automated traffic enforcement safety device if the device was used to provide evidence of a violation.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ol (PDH)

 

States Reconsider Sunscreen as Banned Drug in Schools

Head to a park or a pool and you’ll see it-parents lathering their kids with sunscreen. And for good reason. Childhood skin is very vulnerable to sun damage. “Sunburns in childhood play a big role in the risk of skin cancer later in life,” according to Dr. Jeff Ashley, a California dermatolgist and the founder of sunsafetyforkids.org.
So it may seen surprising that in most states children aren’t allowed to bring sunscreen to school-at least not without a doctor’s note. That’s because the Food and Drug Administration considers sunscreen an over-the-counter drug, and most schools have a zero-tolerance policy for drugs. Generally, students can’t possess sunscreen and school employees can’t offer it to their students. Ashley has a simple word for that policy: “Silly.”
This may soon change in Washington state, where a bill passed by the legislature and now sitting on Gov. Jay Inslee’s desk would allow “students, parents, and school personnel to possess and apply sunscreen products” on school property, on a field trip, or a school summer camp. No prescription required. The only rule is the parent or guardian must supply the sunscreen. Republican state Senator Ann Rivers sponsored the legislation. She told Education Week, “I want both students and school districts to have protection, students from the sun, and school districts from the idea that sunscreen [is] a dangerous pharmaceutical that needs to be overseen by nurses and others.”
At least five states, California, New York, Oregon, Texas, and Utah, allow sunscreen use by students at school, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Besides Washington, this year six other states-Alabama, Arizona, Georgia, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island-are considering similar legislation.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Oy (Ed Week)

 

Utah school districts work to bring in nations best, brightest educators

In this era of national teaching shortages, school districts are pulling out the stops to attract and retain the best and brightest for classrooms.
Mindy Robison, principal of Crescent Elementary in the Canyons District, is here today to discuss a recent development that will hopefully draw the attention of great educators.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OO (KUTV) video

 

Teenager charged with auto homicide in crash that killed two Moab teens
Courts > Driver, 17, suspected of being under the influence.

A Moab teenager was arrested and booked into jail on Wednesday for allegedly driving while under the influence during a March car crash that killed two other teens.
The teen driver, who was 17 at the time of the crash, has been charged in Monticello’s 7th District Juvenile Court with two counts of second-degree felony automobile homicide, two counts of third-degree felony driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, and one count each of class B misdemeanor reckless driving and unlawful possession of alcohol by a minor.
He also was charged one count of second-degree felony sexual abuse of a child, and one count of a class A misdemeanor lewdness involving a child.
Neither the court documents nor a San Juan County Sheriff’s Office news release explain whether the alleged sexual abuse and lewdness counts are related to the fatal crash. Charging documents indicate only that all eight alleged crimes occurred on March 5.
The teen, who turned 18 four days after the crash, was being held without bail at the San Juan County jail. An initial court hearing was set for May 2.
The crash occurred sometime before 7:30 a.m. on March 5, which was the morning after Grand County High School’s prom.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Of (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Oi (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Oo (Moab Sun News)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9On (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Os (DN via KSL)

 

District: S.L. principal accused of misconduct retires

SALT LAKE CITY – The principal of an elementary school accused of some kind of misconduct will not return to the school and will instead retire, school officials say.
Edison Elementary Principal Laurie Lacy told the district she will retire, the Salt Lake City School District said Wednesday. Lacy was recently placed on leave while Salt Lake police investigate an incident at her school, 466 S. Cheyene St.
A message left at a number believed to be Lacy’s was not immediately returned Wednesday.
Police say the report appears to be isolated, but beyond that, they have released few details about their probe. No criminal charges have been filed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Oh (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Op (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Or (KSL)

 

Utah school district considers cutting ‘unsafe’ bus route

SANDY, Utah- The superintendent of a Salt Lake County school district is recommending the district halt school bus service on a route that has been deemed unsafe by a state engineer who examined the roadway in Big Cottonwood Canyon.
The Deseret News reports state engineer Bruce Spiegel said in a letter to the Canyons School District that there is a “high probability of a serious unfavorable outcome” with the route.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ok (AP via OSE)

 

Wasatch Academy sweeps 2017 best of state awards

MT. PLEASANT – An acknowledged leader in the field of education, Wasatch Academy has been recognized as “Best of State” among all private K-12 schools in Utah for the past eight consecutive years (2009-17).
Wasatch Academy, founded in 1875 and located in Mount Pleasant, is the oldest secondary school in the state, and Utah’s only college preparatory boarding school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OG (Mount Pleasant Pyramid)

 

Holladay Teacher granted 5k for equipment in TV broadcast class
CenturyLink giving out tens of thousands to deserving teachers

HOLLADAY, Utah – CenturyLink gives back to the community through its Teachers and Technology grant program. The company provides $50,000 in education grants a year in Utah.
This month, they’ve been traveling around the state and surprising each chosen teacher with up to $5,000.
Every day, Good4Utah provides the news of the day, while high school students in Kirk Miller’s television broadcast class are providing the important happenings at Olympus High School.
Students are getting hands on experience of putting a newscast together for their school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Oq (KTVX)

Provo School district offers summer access to meals for children

This summer children can enjoy free lunches through Provo City School District’s Summer Child Nutrition Program beginning Monday, June 5, 2017. The Summer Meals Program assures that all children have access to healthy food during the summer when schools are not in session so they can continue to learn and grow.
No applications are necessary to drop in for a meal and all children and teens are welcome. In addition to lunch, all Provo summer meal sites offer free breakfast to accompany a day of fun and educational activities.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ol (PDH)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Take After-School Programs Off the Political Chopping Block
Education Week op-ed by Allison Riddle, 2014 Utah Teacher of the Year

As an elementary teacher, I don’t often get to see where my students end up in life. Colleagues teaching in high school watch their students climb the stage at graduation, winning scholarships and awards I rarely hear about. As my 11-year-olds leave, I can only predict the progress they may make, or challenges they may face in coming years.
A few years ago I ran into the parents of a student I had taught some 15 years earlier. I remembered their daughter Amy Jo as a happy, active student with a blonde ponytail and beautiful blue eyes. When I asked what she was up to, her parents beamed.
“She’s a rocket scientist,” her mom said. I admit that at first I thought they were kidding. She was serious. The adorable 10-year-old who loved softball and coloring pictures was now a rocket scientist working for a private company stationed at Hill Air Force Base. She shared with me that Amy Jo often credits our after school Young Astronauts program for launching her interest in space flight.
“That program is the reason she is a rocket scientist,” her mom told me. “The excitement she experienced never left her!”
I wouldn’t want to be the one to have to tell Amy Jo’s parents that the kind of opportunity that fueled their daughter’s dream may not exist much longer in America.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OI

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Nation’s only federally funded voucher program has negative effect on student achievement, study finds
Washington Post

The nation’s only federally funded voucher program had a negative effect on student achievement from one year to the next, particularly in math, according to a new federal analysis of the program, which helps about 1,100 students in the District of Columbia attend private school.
The Institute of Education Sciences, the research arm of the Education Department, released the evaluation Thursday in the wake of recent studies of state-funded voucher programs in Indiana, Louisiana and Ohio that also showed negative effects on achievement. It comes amid growing scrutiny of voucher programs as President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos are seeking to pour billions of dollars into expanding vouchers and other alternatives to public schools.
Vouchers, deeply controversial in public education, are direct government subsidies that parents can use as scholarships for private schools. These payments can cover all or part of the annual tuition bills, depending on the school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ov

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ow (Institute of Education Sciences)

 

Judge: Mostly white Southern city may secede from school district — even if effort motivated by race
Washington Post

A federal judge has ruled that a predominantly white Alabama city may separate from its more diverse school district, even though the judge concluded that the action was motivated by race and sent messages of racial inferiority and exclusion that “assail the dignity of black school children.”
For years, Gardendale, a bedroom community of Birmingham, has been pushing to form its own small school system. That would mean leaving the school system of surrounding Jefferson County, where black students outnumber whites.
Backers of secession have said that they are seeking local control over schools, not racial segregation. But opponents say that the separation is deeply tied to race and should not be allowed in a place that has been struggling to desegregate its schools since black families first sued half a century ago.
Judge Madeline Haikala of the U.S. District Court in Birmingham – who oversees Jefferson County’s long-running desegregation efforts – issued a ruling late Monday that fully satisfied neither side, charting a path forward for a breakup that she said had been “deplorable” in some ways.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ot

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ou (Birmingham [AL] News)

 

Trump: Nothing More Important Than Being a Teacher
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump has recognized the National Teacher of the Year, and says nothing is more important than being a teacher.
Sydney Chaffee, a humanities teacher at Codman Academy, a public charter school in Boston, holds the honor for 2017. Trump says it’s “really something special” that the winner is from a charter school. Charter schools are publicly funded but privately operated, and Trump supports creating more of them.
Trump commented as he welcomed teachers of the year from all U.S. states and territories to the Oval Office.
The teachers’ visit coincided with first lady Melania Trump’s 47th birthday and she joined the president and Education Secretary DeVos for the event.
The teachers apparently sang “Happy Birthday” to the first lady. Trump said they were “very nice” to do so.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Oa

A copy of the President’s remarks.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OR (White House)

 

There Are No Quick Fixes for Teacher Shortage, Report Warns
Education Week

If you think raising teacher salaries is the way to attract talented young people into the profession, well, that sort of easy-fix, across-the-board solution to the teacher shortage problem will just not do, according to a new report.
Such solutions, say the authors, don’t take into account that shortages do not exist everywhere and in every field. There are, rather, isolated shortages in certain subject areas (like science, math, and special education) and in certain locales (like rural or high-needs schools), and these demand targeted solutions.
The new report, “Understanding and Addressing Teacher Shortages in the United States,” homes in on strategies the authors say will increase the flow of teachers into areas where they’re in shortest supply.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Oz

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9OA (Brookings)

 

WV Gov. Justice signs bill eliminating RESAs, banning Common Core
Charleston (WV) Gazette-Mail

Gov. Jim Justice on Wednesday signed a bill eliminating the current Regional Education Service Agencies and the state Office of Education Performance Audits.
After Wednesday night, bills that Justice has neither signed nor vetoed will automatically become law.
House Bill 2711 also will ban the current Common Core-aligned Smarter Balanced standardized tests and the K-12 Common Core math and English language arts standards themselves.
But several West Virginia education officials have said they don’t believe HB 2711 actually would require the state Board of Education to change its current education standards. The state school board revised its standards, but they are still largely identical to the Common Core national standards blueprint.
HB 2711 also would give county public school systems the new right to make up entire missed school days with built-up extra instructional minutes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Oc

 

Vista district using fingerprint scans for school lunches
San Diego Union-Tribune

The Vista Unified School District is rolling out a system in which students scan their fingerprints to buy lunch at the cafeteria, employing technology used for airport security, government clearances and law enforcement.
The program uses biometrics, which records human measurements for identification purposes. The technology – which has been around for decades – has become a popular feature on cellphones and other devices, and Vista is one of hundreds of school districts across the country relying on it for school lunch programs.
Vista Unified officials say the system expedites lunch lines and protects students’ accounts from theft or accidental misuse, but critics of biometrics have complained that using the technology at schools is overkill, and could expose students to identify theft and privacy risks.
The product’s provider say the system doesn’t store or share fingerprint images, and encrypts them in a way that would be extraordinarily difficult to hack. Students are automatically enrolled in the program, unless parents request that they be excluded.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Oe

 

District: Star teacher berated kids about ‘animal slaughter’
Ocala (FL) Star-Banner

One of Marion County’s star teachers has been placed on unpaid leave amid accusations that he bullied and harassed FFA students who raised livestock to be sold at the Southeastern Youth Fair for slaughter.
Thomas Roger Allison Jr., 53, who taught science at Horizon Academy at Marion Oaks, has called the Future Farmers of America students “murderers” for participating in the program, according to a School District letter documenting the case.
“When the animals’ throats are being slit, they are calling out your names, asking why you are not coming to save them,” Allison, a self-proclaimed animal rights activist, reportedly told students, according to Superintendent of Schools Heidi Maier’s written recommendation for termination.
Maier wrote that Allison “has engaged in a repeated, egregious pattern of mistreating, ridiculing, insulting, intimidating, embarrassing, bullying and abusing FFA students, crushing their dreams and causing them to feel that they must discontinue FFA activities in order to enjoy a peaceful school environment.”
Allison is further accused of harassing the FFA teacher adviser and encouraging his honors science students to harass the FFA members. A district investigation has revealed that Allison is on a quest to end the animal agriculture program because of his beliefs in animal rights. And, Maier alleges, Allison has made it harder for FFA students to get good grades in his science classes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ob

Education Startup EverFi Raises $190 Million
Fortune

When Tom Davidson served as a state legislator for a small district in southern Maine two decades ago, he became intimately familiar with the byzantine, bureaucratic, and often, frankly, subpar sausage-making that goes into bankrolling education at a local level. (“There was never a shortage of good ideas, but almost always a shortage of money,” he says.)
So Davidson took his learnings to the private sector and founded EverFi, an education software startup, in 2008. As CEO, Davidson has been rallying some of the biggest names in business behind his cause. Indeed, on Wednesday, EverFi will announce that it has raised $190 million in new funding from a host of magnates to help bring schooling into the digital age. The company last raised $40 million a year ago, news Fortune covered first.
The round marks one of the largest deals to date in the area of education technology, also known as “ed tech.” It is exceeded in size by only two others: German publishing giant Bertelsmann’s $230 million stake in HotChalk, a firm that develops software for online graduate degree programs, and a $200 million fundraising by TutorGroup, an Alibaba-backed (BABA, +0.74%) startup that helps Chinese speakers learn English online. Both of those came in November 2015.
“We’re starting to see for the first time some scale in the space and the investments are reflective of that playing out,” Davidson said on a phone call.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Od

 

The ‘X-plan’ and other powerful tools you can provide when talking to your kids about proms and alcohol
USA Today

She’s got the dress. He’s got the suit. They’ve got the date. They’ve got the destination.
But have you had the PST? Yup, the Prom Safety Talk.
Probably. But was it a half-hearted “Be careful” type of thing? Quite possibly. We all tend to hope for the best and avoid communicating concern to our kids, despite deep worries, such as those expressed in a just-released Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) poll that found parents ranked prom season as the time of year they are most anxious about their teens drinking alcohol.
Don’t hold back, say the experts. Your worries are completely valid.
And you must have a plan.
“This is night that has been planned for months, down to the most finite detail. Not least of which is how to sneak, hide, and invent new ways to party so the adults won’t catch them,” says Joani Geltman, a Boston-area family counselor and author of A Survival Guide To Parenting Teens, Talking To Your Kids About Sexting, Drinking, Drugs, and Other Things That Freak You Out.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ox

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

May 4:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

May 16:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

May 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=INTEDU

June 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

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