Education News Roundup: May 4, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Davis District agrees to allow girls to participate in wrestling.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Se (DN)

New Utah Foundation report looks at difficulties finding qualified workers in Utah … which, of course, ties in with education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sg (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9SL (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9SK (Utah Business)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9So (KTVX)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9St (KSL)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sw (KUER)
or a copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Si (Utah Foundation)

New study looks at the intersection of state spending on education and state population growth.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SP (Governing)
or a copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SQ (Urban Institute)

The health care bill up for a vote today in Washington will have implications for special education because of its ties with Medicaid.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SG (NYT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9SI (CNBC)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9SJ (The Week)

Poll finds parents of color don’t really trust all-white teaching staffs at schools to educate their children.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SA (USN&WR)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9SC (Ed Week)
or a copy of the poll
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SB (Leadership Conference Education Fund)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Davis District will allow girls to wrestle in junior high programs as part of lawsuit settlement

Low wages, skills gap key to finding qualified workers, study says

The Worrisome Relationship Between Population Projections and State Spending on Kids
A new study confirms a long-held assumption but also reveals a potentially big problem for the future.

Students stealing the show in seventh annual Utah High School Musical Theatre Awards

Fremont High teen critically hurt in dump truck vs. car crash

Mother of victim forgives five years after Sandy Hook
Ogden native advocates for safer schools after massacre

Seven students awarded scholarships in honor of fallen Utah officers

Four Davis schools to get summer upgrades

Hillcrest Junior High science teacher gets surprise check
CenturyLink awards 13 teachers in Utah, part of teachers and technology grant

Utah grocery stores donate nearly $60,000 to area schools

JROTC summer camp offers youth leadership orientation

KHS Principal Jackson leaving for UHSAA job

Utah Technology Council (UTC) Announces CEO Search
President and CEO Richard R. Nelson to Transition from CEO Role in 2017; Organization to Discuss “UTC 3.0” Evolution at Annual Members Meeting Event on May 9

Performance Matters Partners with Teaching Channel to Give K-12 Educators Instant Access to Professional Development Videos to Support Educator and Student Growth
Through this exclusive partnership, teachers can now access a library of 1,000+ exemplary Teaching Channel videos through the Performance Matters Platform

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Betsy DeVos and Donald Trump Are Dismantling Public Education

How Central Park Could Fix Public Education
The New York City landmark bucked the tragedy of the commons. Can America’s school systems do the same?

NATION

A Little­Noticed Target in the House Health Bill: Special Education

Poll: Schools With Mostly White Teachers ‘Not Really Trying’ to Educate Students of Color
A new survey finds that parents of students of color who have mostly white teachers are more likely to think the school system is ‘not really trying’ to educate their children.

Educators Get New Help for Creating Lessons With Drones

At School Choice Event, Trump Praises D.C. Vouchers for Helping Kids Graduate

What Went Wrong With 13 Reasons Why?
The Netflix show is a huge hit. It’s also being denounced by educators and experts for the ways in which it tackles suicide.

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Davis District will allow girls to wrestle in junior high programs as part of lawsuit settlement

LAYTON – Kathleen Janis was never quite sure why she had to fight for the same athletic opportunities her male classmates enjoyed, but she fought anyway.
Last week her persistence paid off.
The 15-year-old Layton teen and her family settled a federal lawsuit they filed against the Davis School District after Janis was denied the right to participate in Central Davis Junior High’s wrestling program because she was a girl.
In exchange for dismissing their complaint, Davis District officials agreed to allow girls to participate in any wrestling school-sanctioned wrestling program. The school district also agreed to pay the family’s legal fees and a monetary settlement.
“That was the big win,” said attorney Stewart Gollan of the change in district policy that barred girls from participating in junior high wrestling programs. “I wasn’t surprised that it got resolved quickly. . We were pretty confident that the case law was so clear.”
In fact, it may be that Judge Robert Shelby granted Janis a temporary restraining order against the district, which allowed her to wrestle on the junior high team this year as a ninth-grader, that persuaded the district to settle the case, he said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Se (DN)

 

Low wages, skills gap key to finding qualified workers, study says

SALT LAKE CITY – Low pay, job desirability, a skills gap and a tight employment market are contributing to a lack of qualified workers in the state workforce, a new report says.
Research from the Utah Foundation – a nonpartisan, independent policy organization – found that while the Beehive State boasts a jobless rate of 3.1 percent with annual job growth at 3.2 percent, Utah’s current labor force participation rate of 69 percent is still well below the 71 percent to 72 percent of the 1990s and early 2000s, said foundation research analyst Chris Collard, who authored “Help Wanted: Workforce Participation, Wages, Job Desirability and Skills Gap.”
He said since the Great Recession, a significant number of Utahns have dropped out of the labor force compared to other states, falling to a low point of 67.7 percent in 2012.
“There is a larger amount of people who aren’t even looking for a job,” Collard said. “They could be students who are focusing on school or retirees, but it’s happening across all age groups. So even among your working age population, there is still a substantial decrease in the number of people participating in Utah’s workforce.”
However, the level has climbed slightly to 68.7 percent as of 2016, the report notes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sg (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9SL (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9SK (Utah Business)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9So (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9St (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sw (KUER)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Si (Utah Foundation)

 

The Worrisome Relationship Between Population Projections and State Spending on Kids
A new study confirms a long-held assumption but also reveals a potentially big problem for the future.

Should geography determine a child’s chances for success? A new look at how much states spend per kid indicates that might be the case.
An analysis by the Urban Institute found that states that spend more per child tend to have better outcomes when taking public education, health and social services into account. At the two ends of the spectrum, Vermont spends nearly three times as much annually on children as Utah. The national average is $7,900 per child. A total of 14 states spend less than $7,000 per child and nine spend more than $10,000 each year.
The analysis also found regional trends: States in the Northeast are more likely to spend more while states spending less than $7,000 per child are mostly in the South and West.
Education spending accounts for most of the annual totals. The data, which count all children in each state, is adjusted for a state’s cost of living. For those reasons, the annual spending total often appears lower than education formula funding levels per state.
Julia B. Isaacs, who co-authored the study, says the findings are troubling. “These wide disparities in public investment,” she says, “raise concerns about whether children nationwide are on equal footing when pursuing the American Dream.”

“It’s not like the data says [Vermont] kids are doing three times better than in Utah,” Isaacs says. “But where you look and control for differences, you still find that states that tend to spend more [is where kids] do better.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SP (Governing)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SQ (Urban Institute)

 

Students stealing the show in seventh annual Utah High School Musical Theatre Awards

Abby Watts has sound advice for anyone taking the stage: “Just take a deep breath and enjoy the day. Enjoy the experience.”
The Woods Cross High School senior, who will be pursuing a bachelor’s degree in musical theater at Utah Valley University after graduation, is a participant in this year’s Utah High School Musical Theatre Awards on May 13. This is the first time in the event’s seven-year history that it will be held in the new George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Theater in Salt Lake City.
Founder Michael Ballam said it’s not a night to miss.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sj (DN)

 

Fremont High teen critically hurt in dump truck vs. car crash

A teenage girl was in critical condition Wednesday after the car she was driving collided with a dump truck near Fremont High School, where she is a student.
Weber County Sheriff’s Sgt. Matt Jensen said the 18-year-old was attempting to turn onto northbound 4700 West at 2550 South when she was struck by the southbound truck about 7:20 a.m.
“There was extensive damage to the car and she had to be extricated [by first responders]. She was flown [by medical helicopter] to McKay-Dee Hospital with a broken femur, broken ribs and internal bleeding.”
The victim remained in critical condition Wednesday afternoon, but Jensen said doctors expected her to recover.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sd (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sf (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sl (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sr (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sq (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Su (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sv (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sx (KNRS)

 

Mother of victim forgives five years after Sandy Hook
Ogden native advocates for safer schools after massacre

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – Five years after the Sandy Hook shooting a mother with Utah ties learns to forgive her daughter’s killer. Alissa Parker is now using her heartbreaking experience to prevent another tragedy.
Parker and her husband grew up in Ogden before moving to Connecticut. Their six-year-old daughter, Emilie, was among 20 children and six adults killed by Adam Lanza at Sandy Hook Elementary School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ss (KTVX)

 

Seven students awarded scholarships in honor of fallen Utah officers

Seven plaques sat on a table as family members and police officers came together to award scholarships to seven students. With each plaque comes a $2,500 scholarship. Though, each plaque also carries a name and story: that of fallen police officers.
Zions Bank hosted the Utah 1033 Foundation’s annual leadership award program in the Founders Room of the bank’s head office in Salt Lake City on Wednesday.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sm (PDH)

 

Four Davis schools to get summer upgrades

BOUNTIFUL – Davis School District schools will be seeing a variety of building upgrades this summer.
The Board of Education approved a handful of facilities projects at a meeting in April and approved four more at a meeting Tuesday, May 2.
All of the newly approved construction projects will take place over the summer. They will be paid for from the district’s capital fund, spokesman Chris Williams said in an email.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sk (OSE)

 

Hillcrest Junior High science teacher gets surprise check
CenturyLink awards 13 teachers in Utah, part of teachers and technology grant

SALT LAKE, UT — For the last month CenturyLink has been awarding deserving teachers up to $5,000 in grant money.
The telecom giant awards $50,000 dollars every year in Utah, through its Teachers and Technology grant program.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sp (KTVX)

 

Utah grocery stores donate nearly $60,000 to area schools

SALT LAKE CITY – Grocery stores affiliated with Associated Foods donated $59,600 to area elementary schools as part of the School Cents program.
Donated funds will be used to purchase a variety of items, depending on the schools’ needs.
This is the 17th year the stores – Macey’s, Lin’s, Dan’s, Dick’s Market and Fresh Market – have run the program, which allows shoppers to donate to the school of their choice when they shop with their Macey’s Perk’s or PLUS rewards account.
Schools earn money from August through March before receiving a check during a special presentation at the school with store team members. School Cents has donated more than $624,000 over the past five years.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sh (DN)

 

JROTC summer camp offers youth leadership orientation

The Dixie High School and Pine View High School units of Air Force JROTC will participate together in a joint summer camp from June 26 to 30 and are inviting all incoming 9th through 12th graders in the Washington County School District to sign up.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sn (SGS)

 

KHS Principal Jackson leaving for UHSAA job

The Utah High School Activities Association announced Brenan Jackson, Jan Whittaker and Jonathan Oglesby as assistant directors.
“All three of the new assistant directors have been affiliated with exceptional schools and programs, and have been trained by, and worked alongside, some of the best in their profession,” UHSAA Executive Director Rob Cuff said. “The objective of the hiring committee was to blend and balance the strengths and skill sets of three quality candidates. The administrative and leadership experience of Jackson, the strength of Whittaker’s organization and management skills, and the technology, media and marketing knowledge which Oglesby possesses will be tremendous assets for the member schools, students, and student-athletes of the association.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SO (Southern Utah News)

 

Utah Technology Council (UTC) Announces CEO Search
President and CEO Richard R. Nelson to Transition from CEO Role in 2017; Organization to Discuss “UTC 3.0” Evolution at Annual Members Meeting Event on May 9

Utah Technology Council (UTC), one of the nation’s most vibrant and highly respected technology associations, has announced that it is launching a CEO search. President and CEO Richard R. Nelson, who has headed UTC for 18 years, since 1999, will be transitioning away from his current full-time role later this year. The Executive Committee is looking for qualified leadership candidates, who are invited to apply via UTCCEO at perelson.com.
UTC will discuss its plans for further evolution and growth becoming one of the nation’s most compelling locations for technology advancement at its Annual Members Me
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SM (BusinessWire)

 

Performance Matters Partners with Teaching Channel to Give K-12 Educators Instant Access to Professional Development Videos to Support Educator and Student Growth
Through this exclusive partnership, teachers can now access a library of 1,000+ exemplary Teaching Channel videos through the Performance Matters Platform

SANDY, Utah — Most K-12 teachers work alone in their classrooms, so they rarely have the time or the opportunity to see others teach. Videos can improve teacher effectiveness – and student success – by exposing educators to methods they may not have tried or even imagined in their own teaching. To make it easy for teachers to watch, share, and learn new techniques to help every student grow, Performance Matters has partnered with Teaching Channel. Through this exclusive partnership, Teaching Channel’s award-winning library of exemplary teaching videos are now seamlessly integrated into the Performance Matters Platform.
Within the Performance Matters Educator Growth and Student Growth solutions, teachers now have anytime, anywhere access to Teaching Channel’s collection of more than 1,000 videos. The online library of inspiring, curated, and effective teaching practices is indexed for easy retrieval and can be searched by Common Core State Standard, grade level, subject, topic or teaching strategy.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SN (BusinessWire)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Betsy DeVos and Donald Trump Are Dismantling Public Education
Time op-ed by Randi Weingarten, president of the AFT

Donald Trump may say teachers are important, but he spent his first 100 days undermining the schools most educators work in -America’s public schools.
One of President Trump’s first acts was to appoint the most anti-public education person ever to lead the Department of Education. Betsy DeVos has called public schools a “dead end” and bankrolled a private school voucher measure in Michigan that the public defeated by a two-to-one ratio. When that failed, she spent millions electing legislators who then did her bidding slashing public school budgets and spreading unaccountable for-profit charters across the state. The result? Nearly half of Michigan’s charter schools rank in the bottom of U.S. schools, and Michigan dropped from 28th to 41st in reading and from 27th to 42nd in math compared with other states.
Now DeVos is spreading this agenda across the country with Trump and Vice President Mike Pence’s blessing. They’ve proposed a budget that takes a meat cleaver to public education and programs that work for kids and families. After-school and summer programs – gone. Funding for community schools that provide social, emotional, health and academic programs to kids – gone. Investments to keep class sizes low and provide teachers with the training and support they need to improve their craft – gone. Their budget cuts financial aid for low-income college students grappling with student debt at the same time the Trump administration is making it easier for private loan servicers to prey on students and families.
The Trump/DeVos budget funnels more than $1 billion to new voucher and market strategies even though study after study concludes those strategies have hurt kids. Recent studies of voucher programs in Ohio and Washington, D.C., show students in these programs did worse than those in traditional public schools. Further, private voucher schools take money away from neighborhood public schools, lack the same accountability that public schools have, fail to protect kids from discrimination, and increase segregation.
It’s dangerous in education when the facts don’t matter to people. But it doesn’t stop there. Schools must be safe and welcoming places for all children, and that’s a belief shared both by parents who send their kids to voucher schools and those who send their kids to public schools. But Trump and DeVos have acted to undermine the rights of kids who look or feel different, and to cut funding for school health and safety programs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SH

 

How Central Park Could Fix Public Education
The New York City landmark bucked the tragedy of the commons. Can America’s school systems do the same?
Atlantic commentary by GAIL CORNWALL, a writer based in San Francisco

“[T]hat which is common to the greatest number has the least care bestowed upon it.” – Aristotle
The economics concept of “the tragedy of the commons” sounds both dramatic and complex, but it’s actually quite familiar, particularly to anyone who has rented a car.
Also known as “the open-access problem,” the theory gained notoriety when the ecologist Garrett Hardin used it in a 1968 Science article. “Picture,” he wrote, “a pasture open to all.” Each herdsman gains by “keep[ing] as many cattle as possible on the commons,” because he reaps the full profit from additional milk production yet spreads the cost of overgrazing out over the entire community. All know their shared resource would be maximized if they restrained themselves, yet each is personally incentivized to exploit.
That’s what happens with “it’s just a rental.” Everyone wins if we all take good care of the Hyundai Sonata, but the math comes out differently when I can only make it to my important meeting by eating soup while hopping a curb.
Like other public goods, education is supposed to flow freely, not resemble a commons. Grinnell Smith and Colette Rabin, elementary-education professors at San Jose State University, explain, “[Americans] recognize that higher levels of education track with lower incidences of crime, lower healthcare costs, higher employment rates and many other factors likely to improve conditions for everyone . so collectively, we agree to pay for public schools.” But in practice, funding (and teacher) shortages create a limited resource that’s then depleted by school-choice programs and segregation.
To see why this is so, and what can be done about it, a short stroll through the history of Central Park is in order.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SF

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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A Little­Noticed Target in the House Health Bill: Special Education
New York Times

WASHINGTON – While House Republicans lined up votes Wednesday for a Thursday showdown over their bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act, Vickie Glenn sat in her Murphysboro, Ill., office and prayed for it to fail.
Ms. Glenn, a Medicaid coordinator for Tri­County Special Education, an Illinois cooperative that helps more than 20 school districts deliver special education services to students, was worried about an issue that few in Congress were discussing: how the new American Health Care Act, with its deep cuts to Medicaid, would affect her 2,500 students.
With all the sweeping changes the Republican bill would impose, little attention has been paid to its potential impact on education. School districts rely on Medicaid, the federal health care program for the poor, to provide costly services to millions of students with disabilities across the country. For nearly 30 years, Medicaid has helped school systems cover costs for special education services and equipment, from physical therapists to feeding tubes. The money is also used to provide preventive care, such as vision and hearing screenings, for other Medicaid­eligible children.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SG

http://gousoe.uen.org/9SI (CNBC)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9SJ (The Week)

 

Poll: Schools With Mostly White Teachers ‘Not Really Trying’ to Educate Students of Color
A new survey finds that parents of students of color who have mostly white teachers are more likely to think the school system is ‘not really trying’ to educate their children.
U.S. News & World Report

Black and Latino parents whose children’s teachers are mostly white are more likely to believe schools are “not really trying” to educate students of color than those with mostly black or mostly Latino teachers.
That’s one of the major findings in the second annual poll from The Leadership Conference Education Fund and Anzalone Liszt Grove Research, which aim to capture the views of parents and families of color on education – a group, the poll organizers underscored, whose members are often left out of debates about education policies that directly affect them despite the fact that their children constitute a majority of public school students.
The sentiment speaks to mounting research on the impact of teachers of color, including the latest finding that having at least one black teacher in elementary school significantly increases the chances that low-income black students graduate high school and consider attending college.
Specifically, the poll found that among black parents whose children’s teachers are mostly white, 50 percent believe that schools are “not really trying to educate” black and Latino students, compared to 39 percent whose children have mostly black teachers. Among Latino parents whose children’s teachers are mostly white, 27 percent believe school are not trying to educate black and Latino students, compared to 20 percent whose children have mostly Latino teachers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SA

http://gousoe.uen.org/9SC (Ed Week)

A copy of the poll
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SB (Leadership Conference Education Fund)

 

Educators Get New Help for Creating Lessons With Drones
Education Week

Drones have been drifting into K-12 classroom lesson for years. Now teachers are receiving more specific guidance than ever before on how to use the aerial devices in ways that will bring a payoff for students.
The guidance is coming from organizations like the International Society for Technology in Education, which recently published advice for educators on the subject, and the National Science Teachers Association, which at its conferences has offered educators guidance on how to use drones in classes.
ISTE’s blueprint, “Drones in Education: Let Your Students’ Imaginations Soar,” argues for integrating drones into instruction across multiple subjects. The science teachers’ group is staging professional development activities to help teachers come up with specific ideas for lessons crafted around the aerial devices.
One of the authors of the ISTE book, Laura Zieger, argued that lessons involving drones can not only expose students to cutting-edge technology, but also prepare them for potential careers in science-focused fields.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sy

A copy of the book
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Sz (ISTE) $

 

At School Choice Event, Trump Praises D.C. Vouchers for Helping Kids Graduate
Education Week

At a White House event Wednesday to promote school choice, President Donald Trump praised a District of Columbia program that provides vouchers for low-income children to attend private schools. But he didn’t mention a recent federal study showing negative impacts on students who received the vouchers compared to those who applied for, but did not get, the vouchers.
Trump stopped by the event, which was led by Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and Vice President Mike Pence, and said the following, according to a transcript of the president’s remarks sent along by the administration:
“The opportunity scholarship program that we’re funding allows families in the inner city of our nation’s capital to leave failing public schools and attend a private school, making an extraordinary difference in these incredible young lives. … The results speak for themselves. Ninety-eight percent of scholarship recipients represent their high school diplomas, and they’re really very, very special. They go into tremendous successes.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SD

 

What Went Wrong With 13 Reasons Why?
The Netflix show is a huge hit. It’s also being denounced by educators and experts for the ways in which it tackles suicide.
Atlantic

By Netflix’s metric of success, 13 Reasons Why is a huge hit. The 13-episode drama, structured around the narrative of a girl explaining posthumously why she killed herself, is the most tweeted-about show of 2017. It’s also been hugely popular among teen viewers, whom Netflix is eager to hook. Given that the streaming service’s business model values perceived popularity over actual popularity, the record levels of engagement with 13 Reasons Why make it such a surefire winner that the show’s writer’s room was reportedly brainstorming a second season within days of the release of the first.
But the positive buzz around the show has been engulfed in recent days by charges that the show glamorizes suicide: that its graphic portrayal of Hannah Baker’s death is fundamentally irresponsible and could contribute to a contagion effect that leads vulnerable teens-the show’s primary demographic-to end their lives. The National Association of School Psychologists has issued guidelines for educators in talking with students about the show, while the New Zealand Office of Film and Literature has created new standards to advise that under-18s don’t watch the series without adult supervision.
On Wednesday, Netflix announced that it was adding “additional advisories” to the show, including a new warning card at the beginning of the first episode. But the scene of Hannah’s death remains in the final episode, urging the question of how a show themed around such a sensitive subject managed to break virtually every rule in the media playbook when it comes to treatment of suicide-so much so that when a suicide-prevention expert was shown episodes in advance, he reportedly advised Netflix not to release it.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9SE

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

May 4:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

May 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

May 16:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

May 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=INTEDU

June 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

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