Education News Roundup: May 15, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos

AP looks anew at vouchers in Utah with the ascendancy of Secretary DeVos, a voucher proponent.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xp (AP)

AP also has a national package on vouchers and school choice generally.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XR (AP) main story
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XS (AP) Secretary DeVos’ political involvement in school choice
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XT (AP) school choice financial backers generally

Congratulations to new Murray Supt. Jennifer Covington.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xq (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xw (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9XV (DN via KSL)
or http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xr (Murray School District)

KSL looks at Utah’s teacher shortage.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yk (KSL)

New York Times looks at the Google-ization of American education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Y0 (NYT)

For parents is the equation really Math < Reading?
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yd (Ed Week)
or a copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ye (Overdeck Foundation)

If gym class burps can be ruled on by the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals and discussed by the U.S. Supreme Court, they can be included in the news roundup.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xk (AP)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xl (Reuters)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yf (Ed Week)
or a copy of the 10th Circuit Court ruling
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yg (10th Circuit Court)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Trump, DeVos embolden Utah school voucher supporters

Murray School District chooses its first female superintendent

Schools scramble to hire teachers amid shortage

American Fork charter school still on warning, changing locations

New Program Builds Bridges Across Disciplines

Huntsman Awards recognize excellence in education

San Juan County hopes significant salary incentive will attract veteran teachers

Utah schools receive official state STEM designation

Utah High School Musical Theater Awards earns straight A’s

2017 Sterling Scholar awards winners, Northeast region

Playground honoring Provo family killed in plane crash opens

So long, South Campus: Emotions mixed as program moves back to Logan High

Utah Education Network (UEN) Recognizes Utah Educators Working With At-Risk Youth
UEN-TV Airs Documentary “The One That Got Away” Examining the Life of an At-Risk-Youth

Names, mascots and color options released in survey for new Farmington high school

North-side school parents learn about upcoming CCSD reconfiguration

New boundaries set for Pine View, Desert Hills, Crimson high schools

Coming out of retirement: Principal agrees to one more year at Edith Bowen

Learning technology in Utah is good business

Ridgeline band director released, relocated to teaching position at South Cache

Former basketball coach accused of threatening school takes plea deal

HOPE Squads help prevent suicide in Utah high schools

Physics students from Utah, Nevada, Wyoming, Idaho test Lagoon’s Physics Day

Logan’s Bike to Work and School week starts Monday

Provo students’ essays lead to garage, bake sale for good cause

Utah’s lacrosse history has roots in Logan

Q&A: Could less school and fewer tests be the key to better scores?

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Who deserves praise and criticism this week in Northern Utah?

Valuing children requires more than words

Shannon Hale’s ‘Real Friends’ recalls navigating tricky elementary school years

Unique needs

Vaccinate children

Band director move not a news story

How to stop school lunch shaming? Leave kids out of it

Betsy DeVos was asked to address education reporters at their annual convention. She said no.

NATION

Voucher Proposals Expose Rift in School Choice Movement

Education Secretary Has Long History of Financing Politics

Key Findings on Political Spending by School-choice Backers

How Google Took Over the Classroom
The tech giant is transforming public education with low­cost laptops and free apps. But schools may be giving Google more than they are getting.

Revamped “Anti-Science” Education Bills in U.S. Find Success
Legislation urges educators to “teach the controversy” and allows citizens to challenge curricula

Do Parents See Math as ‘Less Useful’ Than Reading?
Survey finds parents rank subject lower

School Boards Give Superintendents Hefty Severance Packages to Quit Early

Stigma Hobbles Career and Technical Education

AP Test-Takers’ Tweets May Not Give Away Answers, But They Raise Questions

Solving the Mystery of Underachievement
Why work hard enough to earn an A when a D will suffice for college admission?

Schools Face Vexing Test: Which Kids Will Sexually Attack?

Ohio Supreme Court: backpack searches fair game on school property

Justices Reject Appeal of Student Arrested for Burping

Texas Latest State to Consider Requiring High School Civics Test

At 3 a.m., NC Senate GOP strips education funding from Democrats’ districts

More States Allow Sunscreen at Schools Without Doctor’s OK

Michelle Obama slams Trump school lunch rollback, says kids will eat ‘crap’

Barron Trump to Attend Suburban Washington Private School
The 11-year-old is moving with first lady to D.C. this summer

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Trump, DeVos embolden Utah school voucher supporters

Emboldened by the new White House administration, the money man behind Utah’s ambitious voucher proposal that was crushed by voters a decade ago says there is a renewed appetite to expand school choice in the state.
Overstock founder Patrick Byrne said the school vouchers movement has been rekindled in his home state now that his longtime acquaintance and fellow school vouchers advocate Betsy DeVos has been appointed education secretary by President Donald Trump.
DeVos was in Utah on Tuesday at an annual education technology conference, where she compared school choice to being able to switch between phone service providers.
“There’s all kinds of things I disagree with from the Trump administration, but I love that they appointed Betsy,” Byrne said in an interview with The Associated Press. “The time to strike is when the iron is hot, and the iron is hot right now.”
In 2007, Utah lawmakers created what would have been the nation’s first statewide school voucher program. But opponents led by the Utah Education Association gathered enough signatures to take it to a referendum to repeal the bill.
The teachers union was armed with millions of dollars for the effort. Yet it was still considered an uphill battle given that the Byrne family alone contributed more than $4 million to ensure vouchers would be available to any student’s family who wanted to take their tax dollars to a private school.
On Election Day, 62 percent of the voters spoke out against vouchers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xp (AP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xm (AP via SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9XK (AP via LHJ)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9XQ (AP via CVD)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xn (AP via OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yu (AP via PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xo (AP via KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yj (AP via Ed Week)

 

Murray School District chooses its first female superintendent

A woman will lead Murray School District – a first in its 111-year history.
Jennifer Covington, principal of Hillcrest Junior High School since 2009, will step into the role July 1, according to a news release from the district.
Covington has been a Murray educator for 23 years, starting in 1994 as a business and information technology teacher at Murray High School, then serving as vice principal for five years at Hillcrest Junior High School before being promoted to principal, the release said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xq (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xw (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9XV (DN via KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xr (Murray School District)

 

Schools scramble to hire teachers amid shortage

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah faces a teacher shortage and many school districts around the state are left competiting with each other to hire the best candidates.
Sally Sansom spent much of early spring on the road at teacher job fairs trying to pitch Utah as “the place to be.”
“We’d work until the very end, until the janitors would kick us out and take down the tables,” she said.
As the human resources administrator for the Canyons School District, she had to work hard to hire more than 175 teachers. Her counterparts at other districts, though, needed even more teachers hired.
The Jordan School District is looking to hire at least 400 teachers and the Alpine School District will hire approximately 700 teachers.
Utah’s teacher shortage is caused by two factors: 40 percent of new teachers are quitting within the first few years on the job and Utah has nearly 10,000 new students entering the school system.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yk (KSL)

 

American Fork charter school still on warning, changing locations

An American Fork public charter school that has been under a state warning for years will remain under warning.
The Utah State Charter School Board made no further punitive actions regarding Pioneer High School for the Performing Arts, which could have included putting the school on probation or recommending it close, during the state board’s meeting Thursday. Instead, the school will have to report back to the state board next month with information the board requests from it.
The state expressed concerns Thursday about the school’s low enrollment and academics.
“All of these concerns about the business aspect of operating your school are valid concerns,” said Greg Haws, a member of the state charter board.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yo (PDH)

 

New Program Builds Bridges Across Disciplines

The University of Utah will become the first university to provide a Masters of Arts and Teaching Fine Arts Degree hybrid program.
The online and in-person courses are intended to allow current fine arts teachers to continue their education without sacrificing their jobs. After eight years of discussion and planning, the program is finally coming together.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yq (Daily Utah Chronicle)

 

Huntsman Awards recognize excellence in education

SALT LAKE CITY – Nine teachers, three administrators and one school volunteer are among 13 Utahns honored with 2017 Huntsman Awards for Excellence in Education.
Each award, to be presented at a ceremony Friday, includes a $10,000 check from philanthropist Jon Huntsman Sr.
The awards program, started in 1993, recognizes outstanding educators and volunteers who work in publicly funded Utah schools. The winners were selected among nominees in four categories: teacher, administrator, volunteer and special education teacher.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xy (DN)

 

San Juan County hopes significant salary incentive will attract veteran teachers

MONTEZUMA CREEK, San Juan County – One of the most remote schools in Utah has seen remarkable success thanks to a pilot program aimed at stemming teacher turnover and putting more experienced educators in the classroom.
Now, San Juan School District is launching a program to expand that success to more schools by paying veteran teachers top dollar.
Montezuma Creek Elementary is located on the Navajo Nation near Four Corners. The area is plagued by intergenerational poverty. “These kids qualify for the highest poverty rate, anywhere probably in the United States,” said Ron Neilson, elementary supervisor for San Juan School District.
Finding and keeping experienced teachers has been a challenge. Most have less than three years on the job.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XX (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yr (DN via KSL)

 

Utah schools receive official state STEM designation

The Utah State Board of Education approved eight public schools for the Utah STEM School Designation. This is the second group of schools to be selected since the program began last year.
USBE, in partnership with the Utah STEM Action Center, developed the Utah STEM Schools Designation program to better define and standardize the elements that create a comprehensive STEM learning environment for Utah students. The program furthers schools’ opportunities to engage in STEM-related discussions with faculty and community partners and develop strong instruction for students to prepare them for college and careers. The designation also serves as an indicator for members of the public who are looking for quality STEM school experiences in Utah K-12 education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xi (UP)

 

Utah High School Musical Theater Awards earns straight A’s

SALT LAKE CITY – Infectious excitement buzzed through the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Theater right before 7 p.m. Saturday. Dressed in an eclectic range of colors and patterns, it seemed that at any moment the audience members on the orchestra level would break into song and dance.
But these weren’t just audience members – these were 250 plus performers from 29 Utah high schools, nearly bursting to get on stage for the Utah High School Musical Theatre Awards.
Not only were the awards a chance for schools to compete for titles such as best choreography and best set design, but they were also an opportunity for the night’s best actor and best sctress recipients to win a paid trip to New York City for a week on Broadway to compete in the National High School Musical Theatre Awards.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XB (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yl (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yn (Broadway World)

 

2017 Sterling Scholar awards winners, Northeast region

The Deseret News/KSL 2017 Sterling Scholar award winners for the Central region were named in the culmination of the scholarly competition.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xx (DN)

 

Playground honoring Provo family killed in plane crash opens

The blue and yellow, two-story Openshaw Family Memorial Playground is one of the tallest in the Utah Valley, according to Dean Nielsen, the principal of Rock Canyon Elementary School.
That height, he said, is a testament to the family the structure honors.
“This family, in my opinion, deserves the highest marks for their service,” Nielsen said.
Family of the four members of the Openshaw family cut the ribbon to the memorial playground Friday evening at Rock Canyon Elementary School in Provo.
But it wasn’t a typical ribbon cutting. Instead of using a pair of large scissors to cut through a ribbon, family members used kindergarten scissors to cut through a banner signed by current Rock Canyon students.
The playground serves as a tribute to the four members of the Openshaw family who died in a 2015 plane crash in Missouri. Parents Amy and Mark died in the crash along with 15-year-old Tanner and 12-year old Ellie, two of their five children. Max, who was 5 at the time, survived the crash, and their other two sons, Zane and Porter, were abroad at the time.
The Openshaws were well known in the Provo and educational communities. Mark was a member of the Utah State Board of Education and Amy was a constant school volunteer and served as a PTA president. Mark was also a bishop in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XI (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9XU (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9XW (KSL)

 

So long, South Campus: Emotions mixed as program moves back to Logan High

At 9:30 on Wednesday morning, Larry Comadena had 23 text messages from his students at Logan High South Campus.
If they aren’t in class when the bell rings, Comadena or a South Campus teacher will check in and ask why.
“I’m texting, I’m calling kids and parents so I know your name,” he said. “Hey, your dad got laid off. Hey, what’s happened to your mom? What can we do to help?'”
South Campus students are all there for a different reason. Some have problems with academics, some struggle with their behavior, some have mental or physical issues and some were bullied at the Logan High main campus.
Comadena, the dean of students at South Campus, said these students went from a situation where teachers might not have known their name to a setting where teachers create individual plans for each student and are constantly asking how they can help.
“Kids naturally gravitate toward that, that’s what’s so appealing about this school and that’s why it’s worked over the years. The staff is amazing,” he said.
After the class of 2017 walks across the stage on May 24, the South Campus building – a five block walk from the main campus – will close its doors for good as an alternative high school. Next year, South Campus students will join the Innovations program at Logan High’s main campus.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XJ (LHJ)

 

Utah Education Network (UEN) Recognizes Utah Educators Working With At-Risk Youth
UEN-TV Airs Documentary “The One That Got Away” Examining the Life of an At-Risk-Youth

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah Education Network (UEN) today announces the recognition of Utah’s American Graduate Champions working with Youth in Care (YIC). These educators have been nominated by their peers for their dedication to helping youth overcome challenging circumstances and reach academic milestones: Abe Kimball, Cindy Willis, Danelle Black, Jacqueline Bode, Jared Tucker, Jim Hawkes, Jodie Horgan, Leona Schexnayder, Marvin Hull, Marv Luddington, Melanie Bliss, Mitch Peterson, Nikki Sorensen, Rebecca Jackson, Sharon Hall, Sheri Bradshaw, Sombryn Williams, Spencer Robinson, Tim Marriott and Virginia Parry. Individual profiles of Utah’s 2017 American Graduate Champions can be viewed here.
With more than one in four Utah children encountering the Juvenile Justice System before their eighteenth birthday, too many youth face difficult circumstances that disrupt their education. To bring awareness to the issues, UEN will air the documentary “The One That Got Away” by Emmy Award-winning documentary filmmakers John Block and Steve McCarthy on UEN-TV Tuesday, May 16 at 9 p.m. MT and Saturday, June 10 at 8 p.m. MT. To view UEN-TV’s complete programming schedule visit http://www.uen.org/tv/.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ys (PR Newswire)

 

Names, mascots and color options released in survey for new Farmington high school

FARMINGTON – The newest Davis School District high school in Farmington is closer to having a name, mascot and official colors.
An online survey sent to the families of students at nearby high schools and the junior high and elementary schools that feed into them included ten possible names and 11 possible mascots.
The survey closes just before midnight Friday, May 12, and the top three most popular options will be presented to the district’s Board of Education at a Tuesday, May 16 meeting. Board members will then have time to think about it before taking a vote at a June 6 meeting.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XG (OSE)

 

North-side school parents learn about upcoming CCSD reconfiguration

RICHMOND – Representatives from schools on the north side of Cache County School District met with parents on Thursday night to answer questions about an upcoming school reconfiguration that will tweak how grades are grouped in schools.
CCSD went through a similar change on the south side last year. Students used to go through a K-5 elementary school, a 6-7 center, an 8-9 middle school and a 10-12 high school. With the opening of Ridgeline High last year, the ninth grade moved to the high school and elementary schools added sixth grade. With Green Canyon High opening in the fall, the north side will go through the same process.
Tim Smith, CCSD public information officer, told the parents in attendance that the reconfiguration is due mostly to population growth. About a decade ago, voters approved a $60 million bond to build new elementary schools. In 2013, voters approved a $129 million to build the two new high schools, among other projects.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XL (LHJ)

 

New boundaries set for Pine View, Desert Hills, Crimson high schools

ST. GEORGE – New boundaries for three area high schools were adopted Tuesday in anticipation of the opening of the new Crimson High School in 2019.
The boundaries were approved by the Washington County School District Board of Education during a regular meeting Tuesday. See boundary maps at the end of this article.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yp (SGN)

 

Coming out of retirement: Principal agrees to one more year at Edith Bowen

Students, parents and faculty at Edith Bowen Laboratory School will be able to keep Principal Dan Johnson around for another year, even though he announced his retirement in late February.
Beth Foley, dean of the Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services, said the timing of Johnson’s retirement announcement caused them to miss the cycle on hiring a new principal. They would have had to appoint an interim principal until a permanent hire was found, so she asked Johnson to stay on for another year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XN (LHJ)

 

Learning technology in Utah is good business

Education in all phases of life is changing, and local technology businesses are leading some of that revolution.
Provo-based Imagine Learning is one of those that offer an individualized learning software platform. They cater their technology to English Language Learners and those struggling with math literacy in preschool up to high school. Because of the speed of technology, the company is growing at a significant rate, and expanding its reach further.
“We reach about four million kids out there on a weekly basis,” said CEO Joe Swenson.
Swenson explained that Imagine Learning does not replace classroom teachers. Through learning technology, teachers have more time and ability to reach each individual child, because the software can pinpoint exactly what concept a child struggles to understand.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yt (PDH)

 

Ridgeline band director released, relocated to teaching position at South Cache

For reasons the Cache County School District has not made entirely clear, Ridgeline High School Band Director Jason Petrovich has been released from his position and will move to South Cache Middle School as a choir teacher next school year.
“We’re just heading in another direction,” Ridgeline Principal Bob Henke said.
Henke said he can’t provide any details on why Petrovich was released as band director, as it is a personnel issue.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XO (LHJ)

 

Former basketball coach accused of threatening school takes plea deal

AMERICAN FORK – A former college basketball coach with a history of mental illness who was accused last year of terrorizing an Eagle Mountain elementary school has admitted to a reduced charge in the case.
Christopher Dewitt Craig, 35, of Eagle Mountain, pleaded guilty to making a false alarm, a second-degree felony, while additional charges were dismissed. He was originally charged with with making a threat of terrorism, a second-degree felony; failure to disclose his identity, a class B misdemeanor; and disrupting a school, a class B misdemeanor.
Prosecutors are recommending a possible two-step reduction for the charge as part of the plea deal, which would bring Craig’s conviction down to a class A misdemeanor if he successfully completes “zero tolerance” probation.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XC (DN)

 

HOPE Squads help prevent suicide in Utah high schools

Selina Llewellyn teaches English at Skyridge High School in Lehi, Utah. It’s not unusual for her to have a bunch of kids eating lunch in her classroom, but recently, she had one boy come in to talk to her privately.
As he talked, Llewellyn picked up on a few red flags. She had to ask him a tough question: are you suicidal?
Llewellyn said this only happens about twice each year because high school kids are much more likely to talk to their friends than a teacher about problems like this. But Llewellyn is in a special position to ask this question. She is one of three teachers on the HOPE Squad at a school with three suicide attempts in February.
Students and teachers don’t campaign to be on the HOPE Squad, which keeps a special eye out for suicide warning signs in students. Instead, they’re recruited by an anonymous vote of confidence from the student body, and Llewellyn takes the nomination as a big compliment.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yv (BYU Universe)

Physics students from Utah, Nevada, Wyoming, Idaho test Lagoon’s Physics Day

About 9,000 high school and middle school students from Utah, Idaho, Wyoming and Nevada participated in Physics Day at Lagoon on Friday. The pupils dropped eggs, wore accelerometers and tested out some of the less quantifiable excitement at the Farmington theme park.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xs (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9XY (KSTU)

 

Logan’s Bike to Work and School week starts Monday

“Bike to Work and School Week” in Logan starts Monday, the beginning of what has become one of the fastest growing celebration weeks each year in the city.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XP (CVD)

 

Provo students’ essays lead to garage, bake sale for good cause

Provo Peaks teacher Tina McCulloch, like many across the state, has been trying to teach her fifth-grade students persuasive writing this year.
But it’s a lesson her student’s aren’t likely to forget after their persuasive essays led them to research and plan ways to give back to organizations in the community they felt passionate about.
The students’ persuasive essays even led them to hold a garage and bake sale at the school Saturday to benefit Teleton, an organization that seeks to assist and empower people with special needs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XH (PDH)

 

Utah’s lacrosse history has roots in Logan

LOGAN – Clay Christoffersen remembers the long trips to Colorado. If he and his Logan High teammates wanted an opponent – to just play against some team other than their own – they had to at least go to Denver. There wasn’t another lacrosse team any closer.
It was the late 1970s, and the only high school lacrosse team in the state was the Logan Grizzlies. It was a long bus trip paid for by the players and their families, but it was worth it. They got to play their sport.
Almost 40 years later and Christoffersen is now the head coach at Logan High. His team no longer has to travel more than 500 miles to play – there are three other teams in the valley. With at least 41 high school club teams for boys and another 30 for girls, lacrosse is beginning to thrive in the Beehive State, and took a major step forward earlier this month. The Utah High School Activities Association (UHSAA) announced it would begin sanctioning high school lacrosse.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ym (CVD)

 

Q&A: Could less school and fewer tests be the key to better scores?

Timothy Walker is an American school teacher who suffered a nervous breakdown teaching in Massachusetts before finding peace of mind and career satisfaction teaching second-graders in his wife’s homeland of Finland.
“I had no life outside of my work,” Walker says of the days leading up to his mental crisis. “There were mornings when before school I’d vomit because I was so anxious.”
Those familiar with Finland’s high-flying test scores but unfamiliar with its laid-back educational model might be surprised to find that Walker would find Zen teaching in the icy Baltic nation.
But that seems to be what he has done.
Finland excels on international test scores. It first surprised the education world in 2001 when the first International Student Assessment (PISA) scores put its 15-year-olds at the top of the world on standardized reading, math and science scores. Since then, the tiny Nordic nation has continued to place in the top ranks, standing with Asian testing giants such as Korea, Japan and China.
But unlike Asia, Finland gets its test scores with shorter school days, fewer tests, and much less pressure than American schools.
In his new book, “Teach Like Finland,” Walker outlines simple strategies he thinks could be adapted from the Finnish model to American classrooms to make them both more “joyful” and more successful.
This interview has been edited for clarity and length.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xz (DN)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Who deserves praise and criticism this week in Northern Utah?
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

The Standard-Examiner Editorial Board hashes out the positions we take on the Opinion page. Here’s what members recommended last week for praise and criticism:
THUMBS UP: To the Davis High School robotics team that placed sixth in the VEX Robotics Worlds competition last month.
The six-member team of juniors and seniors competed against 563 other high school teams from around the world – including another Davis team.
Coach and engineering teacher Dane Leifson seems to have a knack for producing top teams. A Davis team placed fifth in 2016 and won the competition in 2015.
“They don’t necessarily feel the pressure of needing to (win), it’s more they understand the awesome passion that’s necessary to get to that level and how fun it is to get there,” Leifson said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XF

 

Valuing children requires more than words
Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Don Gale

Don’t you believe it.
The next time you hear the governor or other Utah politicians say that in Utah children are our number one priority, don’t you believe it. The next time you hear someone from the pulpit – any pulpit – say that we value children above all else, don’t you believe it. The next time you hear legislators say they value children above politics, don’t you believe it.
The facts point to different conclusions.
For more than 30 years, Utah has been at or near the bottom in per-pupil support for public education. That means one entire generation of Utah youngsters have been shortchanged during their most crucial years of learning – one whole generation is behind the rest of the nation in educational development. Only an army of dedicated educators has kept Utah children within shouting distance of average performance – educators who work in over-crowded classrooms and without sufficient textbooks or modern technology. (Don’t give me that baloney about Utah students performing well on universal tests. Those tests are next to meaningless. Most so-called normative tests measure the wrong things – things of lesser importance to child development, not to mention of least importance to teacher performance.)
Legislators brag about large increases in education funding, but in real terms Utah spends less for education today on a per-pupil basis than we did a generation ago. Lawmakers would rather waste money on anti-government witch hunts than spend it on educating Utah children.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xt

 

Shannon Hale’s ‘Real Friends’ recalls navigating tricky elementary school years
Deseret News book review by Christine Rappleye

“REAL FRIENDS,” by Shannon Hale, illustrated by LeUyen Pham, First Second, $12.99, 224 pages (ages 8-12)
Real-life lessons on being a friend and making friends abound in the graphic novel-style “Real Friends” by Utah author Shannon Hale that is wonderfully illustrated by LeUyen Pham.
Drawing on memories and experiences from elementary school, Hale shares her perspective and difficulties navigating friendships, dealing with bullies and teasing and challenging sibling relationships.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XA

 

Unique needs
Deseret News letter from Teresa Mull

In response to M. Donald Thomas’s op-ed of April 21 headlined “Student-Centered Education,” I believe one of the most important considerations is education choice. Children do deserve, as Thomas so rightly asserts, an individualized experience to engage them and stimulate their interests and talents. With school choice, parents and their children are able to customize their learning experience so their learning needs are met, and they can truly reach their full potential. A one-size-fits-all public education can never expect to meet the unique needs of a diverse student population, and parents know best what their children need and want.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XE

 

Vaccinate children
Deseret News letter from Julia Haynes

As a high school student, I encounter hundreds of individuals everyday. That also means I come face to face with thousands of germs and illnesses everyday. Whether they are severe illnesses or not, it is a big problem.
The amount of children and adults not being vaccinated is a huge setback and is on the rise.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XD

 

Band director move not a news story
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Patrick Clark

On May 10th, The Herald Journal decided to publish the story of a teacher being re-assigned in Cache County School District. Teachers being re-assigned to new schools happen relatively often. That leaves me wondering why even writing the article at all. By publishing this story and it’s approach, it seems like the paper is trying to find some scandal that doesn’t exist. I believe it being in poor taste to publish this type of story and advertise it on the front page of the paper. All you do is help spread rumors that will hurt individuals and families. I’m disappointed in the Herald Journal for this story and hope that this paper thinks a little better on what they decide is news.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XM

 

How to stop school lunch shaming? Leave kids out of it
(Washington, DC) The Hill op-ed by JAMES WEILL, president of the Food Research & Action Center

Far too often in school cafeterias across the country, a student is served a lunch, only for it to be thrown away because he or she does not have money in the lunch account or in hand to pay for the meal. Some school districts also reportedly stamp children’s hands or make them wear stickers that say “I need lunch money” – ostensibly to remind a parent or guardian to put funds in a student’s lunch account.
But each of these strategies invariably causes embarrassment in front of the student’s peers, which is why the policies are lumped under the phrase “lunch shaming.” And school districts often discover that many students’ who owe school lunch money are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals, but have not been certified to receive them.
School meal debt is a challenge for most school districts, and policies for how school districts deal with this issue vary significantly. Some allow students to “charge” a meal if they cannot pay, but many limit this to a certain number of meals or a strict dollar amount. Some districts may offer a child a standard meal from the menu regardless of the ability to pay, while other districts may serve an alternate meal such as a cheese sandwich when meal debt accrues. Some offer nothing at all, a practice more common among secondary schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xf

 

Betsy DeVos was asked to address education reporters at their annual convention. She said no.
Washington Post commentary by columnist Valerie Strauss

Every U.S. education secretary has found time to address the Education Writers Association convention, and the organization was hoping that Betsy DeVos would agree to do the same thing at its 2017 convention in Washington. It’s not happening.
Caroline Hendrie, EWA executive editor, said the association invited DeVos to speak at the convention right after she was confirmed by the Senate as education secretary on Feb. 7 (which, you may remember, happened only after Mike Pence broke a tie in the Senate, becoming the first vice president in history to do so for a Cabinet nominee).
When no response was forthcoming, Hendrie said the invitation was renewed several times, but it was not until late April that a staff member at the Education Department called to decline. Why? According to Hendrie, “They couldn’t make it work for her schedule.”
The Education Department did not respond to a query about why they couldn’t make it work.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Y5

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Y6 (Ed Week)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ya (AP)

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Voucher Proposals Expose Rift in School Choice Movement
Associated Press

For two decades, a loose-knit group that includes some of the country’s wealthiest people has underwritten the political push for school choice, promoting ballot initiatives and candidates who favor competition for traditional public schools.
But when a member of this elite group was elevated to education secretary, the appointment opened a philosophical schism that now threatens to shatter the alliance, turn billionaires against each other and possibly lead some school-choice advocates to join with teachers’ unions, their archenemies.
Fueling the split is the anticipation of a plan from President Donald Trump’s administration that could offer parents federal dollars to send their children to private schools, including religious and for-profit institutions.
“As much as we are aligned on change, we aren’t always aligned on how much change or how. Sometimes we fight,” said Derrell Bradford, executive vice president of the school-reform group 50CAN.
The movement has been cleaved into two camps: those who want to use choice to improve public schools and others, like Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, who want to go further by allowing tax money to flow to private schools through vouchers, government-funded scholarships or corporate tax credits.
The differences that once seemed minor are at the heart of a potential seismic shift in the school-choice movement.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XR

 

Education Secretary Has Long History of Financing Politics
Associated Press

Betsy DeVos, President Donald Trump’s education secretary, built her political resume by raising and contributing millions of dollars to support the cause of giving parents choices on where their children go to school.
The daughter of one wealthy businessman and the wife of another, DeVos has headed a series of groups that help rich contributors spend large sums on elections, including one that was assessed the biggest fine ever by the Ohio Elections Commission.
A look at her political activities.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XS

 

Key Findings on Political Spending by School-choice Backers
Associated Press

The Associated Press examined political contributions over a 10-year period by the people who have been major contributors to advance school choice measures such as public charter schools and programs to use taxpayer funding to pay for private school tuition.
Some key findings:

  • Forty-eight individuals or married couples donated at least $100,000 from 2000 to 2016 to support statewide ballot measures advocating for the creation or expansion of charter schools or taxpayer-funded scholarships that can be used for K-12 private school tuition.
  • Those contributors account for more than three-fifths of funding to support the ballot measures since 2000.
  • The support from those contributors totaled nearly $64 million, nearly equal to the amount all opponents of the measures reported spending.
  • Despite the proponents’ spending, voters rejected seven of nine statewide school-choice ballot measures.

http://gousoe.uen.org/9XT

 

How Google Took Over the Classroom
The tech giant is transforming public education with low­cost laptops and free apps. But schools may be giving Google more than they are getting.
New York Times

CHICAGO – The sixth graders at Newton Bateman, a public elementary school here with a classic red brick facade, know the Google drill.
In a social­science class last year, the students each grabbed a Google­powered laptop. They opened Google Classroom, an app where teachers make assignments. Then they clicked on Google Docs, a writing program, and began composing essays.
Looking up from her laptop, Masuma Khan, then 11 years old, said her essay explored how schooling in ancient Athens differed from her own. “Back then, they had wooden tablets and they had to take all of their notes on it,” she said. “Nowadays, we can just do it in Google Docs.”
Chicago Public Schools, the third­largest school district in the United States, with about 381,000 students, is at the forefront of a profound shift in American education: the Googlification of the classroom.
In the space of just five years, Google has helped upend the sales methods companies use to place their products in classrooms. It has enlisted teachers and administrators to promote Google’s products to other schools. It has directly reached out to educators to test its products – effectively bypassing senior district officials. And it has outmaneuvered Apple and Microsoft with a powerful combination of lowcost
laptops, called Chromebooks, and free classroom apps.
Today, more than half the nation’s primary­ and secondary­school students – more than 30 million children – use Google education apps like Gmail and Docs, the company said. And Chromebooks, Google­powered laptops that initially struggled to find a purpose, are now a powerhouse in America’s schools. Today they account for more than half the mobile devices shipped to schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Y0

 

Revamped “Anti-Science” Education Bills in U.S. Find Success
Legislation urges educators to “teach the controversy” and allows citizens to challenge curricula
Scientific American

State and local legislatures in the United States are experimenting with new ways to target the topics taught in science classes, and it seems to be paying dividends. Florida’s legislature approved a bill on May 5 that would enable residents to challenge what educators teach students. And two other states have already approved non-binding legislation this year urging teachers to embrace ‘academic freedom’ and present the full spectrum of views on evolution and climate change. This would give educators license to treat evolution and intelligent design as equally valid theories, or to present climate change as scientifically contentious.
“The strategies of creationists have gotten more sophisticated,” says Glenn Branch, deputy director of the National Center for Science Education(NCSE) in Oakland, California. The first academic freedom bills popped up in the early 2000s, but until this year only three had become law: one in Mississippi in 2006, one in Louisiana in 2008 and another in Tennessee in 2012.
Eleven bills designed to alter science-education standards have been proposed this year across the United States. A handful of those measures have either abandoned the traditional academic freedom model for more roundabout methods, or are using watered-down versions of it.
The Florida legislation, for example, does not try to change state or district education standards. Instead, it enables any tax-paying resident of a given county to file complaints about the curriculum of the schools in their district. A complaint would trigger a public hearing to determine if the material in question is “accurate, balanced, noninflammatory, current, free of pornography . and suited to students’ needs”, according to the legislation.
“But who decides what ‘balanced’ and ‘noninflammatory’ mean?” asks Joan Bertin, executive director of the National Coalition Against Censorship, based in New York City. Currently, instructional materials come from an approved list provided by the state, she says.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yi

 

Do Parents See Math as ‘Less Useful’ Than Reading?
Survey finds parents rank subject lower
Education Week

In the past 20 years, parents have taken to heart public-awareness campaigns urging them to read to their children every night. But math initiatives have not gained as much traction-even as emerging evidence suggests early math may be one of the most critical school-readiness skills.
A survey last month of more than 2,500 parents found that they generally rank math and science as lower in importance and relevance to their children’s lives than reading. Moreover, 38 percent of parents, including half the fathers surveyed, agreed with the statement “Skills in math are mostly useful for those that have careers related to math, so average Americans do not have much need for math skills,” according to the survey by the Overdeck and Simons foundations.
“Nobody is proud to say, ‘I can barely read,’ but plenty of parents are proud to stand up and say, ‘I can barely do math, I didn’t grow up doing well in math, and my kid’s not doing well in math; that’s just the way it is,’ ” said Mike Steele, a math education professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee who was not associated with the study.
“We need to shift the mindset that math is just some innate ability that has a genetic component, and you are either a math person or you are not, to a conception that everybody can do math with effort and support . and to understand why that’s important.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yd

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Ye (Overdeck Foundation)

 

School Boards Give Superintendents Hefty Severance Packages to Quit Early
Education Week

When school boards offer hefty buy-out packages to get rid of superintendents with whom they no longer see eye-to-eye, do taxpayers get the shaft?
It depends.
Let’s look at the most recent case.
A bitter, months-long power struggle between the Howard County, Md., school board and its superintendent, Renee Foose, ended this month when the board approved a nearly $1.65 million severance package in exchange for Foose’s resignation with three years left on her contract.
The “post-termination payments” of $1.13 million-not including compensation for unused days off and pension-adds up to more than what Foose would have been paid in salary if the district had kept her on, according to the Baltimore Sun.
Eye-popping parachute packages are not uncommon in the corporate world, where CEOs and top executives snag multimillion-dollar payouts as they walk out the door. But school districts-where officials are charged with being responsible stewards of public money and in charge of managing resources within very constrained budgets-have also been giving out hefty severance packages to superintendents for them to go away early.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xb

 

Stigma Hobbles Career and Technical Education
Education Week

Students in career and technical education are happier with their high school experience, and more likely to finish high school, than students who don’t take CTE classes. But the career-oriented approach to learning hasn’t managed to shake the old stigma that it’s a pathway to blue-collar work for students who aren’t college material.
That image problem could be one reason that enrollment in career-tech-ed hasn’t soared, even as policymakers increasingly laud it as a promising route to college, and to good jobs in expanding industries. It’s especially relevant, too, since Congress is discussing reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act.
I saw evidence of this stigma as I traveled to several states recently for a series of stories about career and technical education. A teacher in the advanced-manufacturing cluster at a school in Tennessee told me that parents are wary of sending their children into programs they see as funneling them into “dirty hands” factory jobs. (EdWeek’s story about Tennessee’s work to ensure high-quality CTE programs is on our website. Other stories are soon to follow.)
A recent survey that explores students’ and parents’ perspectives on CTE has plenty of encouraging statistics, including the big one that’s been floating around out there for some time: students in career-tech-ed programs have a high school graduation rate of 93 percent. The graduation rate for non-CTE students is 82 percent.
“Yet despite the many benefits of CTE … there are still challenges with limited awareness and outdated perceptions,” says the report by Advance CTE, which represents the leaders of state CTE programs. “Enrollment in CTE programs has remained stagnant over the last decade while demand soars for skilled employees in today’s global economy. If we are to prepare all learners for success in the careers of their choice, more parents and students need to understand all that CTE has to offer them.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xd

A copy of the survey
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xe (Advance CTE)

 

AP Test-Takers’ Tweets May Not Give Away Answers, But They Raise Questions
NPR

No one likes to take tests. Sitting down to take a standardized test on a beautiful Saturday morning would not, almost certainly, be categorized as a fun weekend activity. Yet, it’s a requirement many of us face at one point in life. So we sharpen our No. 2 pencils and get to work.
When the test is over, it is easy to seek solace in those around who have also finished the sweaty-palmed, nervous experience that testing often inspires. And through hushed whispers, test takers alike find comfort in knowing that someone else also had trouble with why the limit does not exist on question 18.
But what happens when these hushed whispers of a confidential test are not so quiet?
For the past two weeks, high school students across the country have been taking their Advanced Placement exams (AP). They are administered by the College Board and depending on a student’s score, could result in early college credit.
As students have put their pencils down, they’ve picked up their phones and gone to Twitter to share their frustrations.
Through hashtags, test takers have categorized tweets about different AP exams. #APLit for the AP Literature and Composition exam. #APBio for the AP Biology exam, and so on.
While these tweets are in jest – and many in the format of popular memes -there is something peculiar about them: they are oddly specific.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9XZ

 

Solving the Mystery of Underachievement
Why work hard enough to earn an A when a D will suffice for college admission?
The Atlantic

As enrollment in higher education reaches record-levels-69.7 percent of all high-school graduates in 2016, a hidden danger awaits thousands at the starting line: Being “eligible” for college admission doesn’t mean that students are academically prepared. This collision of expectations and reality creates a revolving door in higher education that can stifle individual talent and exacerbate inequality at the highest levels of the American education system. This is the story of how Travis Hill, growing up blocks from the White House in northeast Washington, D.C., learned what “college readiness” means when the pursuit of higher education becomes a reality.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yh

 

Schools Face Vexing Test: Which Kids Will Sexually Attack?
Associated Press

The children who sexually assault other children may be the popular jocks, the loners or anyone in between. There is no typical attacker, no way for schools to predict who might inflict that kind of torment on a classmate.
Thousands of school-age offenders are treated annually for sexual aggression in the United States, yet experts see no standard profile of personality, background or motivation.
They say that while anti-social behavior can suggest a greater risk of offending, the cool kid may attack and the rebel may reform. The reasons are rarely as straightforward as physical gratification and range from a sense of entitlement to desperation to fit in.
Though many sexual assaults aren’t reported to authorities, research shows that about 95 percent of juvenile offenders who enter the justice system won’t be arrested for another sex crime. Experts say the ordeal of facing police and parents – along with public condemnation for such taboo acts – scares many straight.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Y9

 

Ohio Supreme Court: backpack searches fair game on school property
Dayton (OH) Daily News

Columbus — In the interest of protecting children, school officials can search students’ bags on school property without first obtaining warrants, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled Thursday.
Students have a diminished expectation of privacy at school because school officials have an obligation to keep them safe, which requires an easing of the regular limitations on searches, the court concluded.
In February 2013, a Columbus Whetstone High School bus driver found student Joshua Polk’s book bag left on the bus and turned it over to Robert Lindsey, a school safety coordinator, who peeked into it and found notebooks, books and a binder and Polk’s name. Lindsey had heard rumor that Polk was in a gang so he took the bag to the principal’s office where they searched it thoroughly and found bullets.
Lindsey, a school police officer and the principal found Polk in a hallway, searched another bag he was carrying and found a gun. Polk was charged with a weapons violation. At trial, he argued that the search was unconstitutional so the discovery of the gun was inadmissible. The trial court and 10th District Court of Appeals agreed. But the Franklin County prosecutor appealed the matter to the supreme court.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xg

A copy of the ruling
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xh (Ohio Supreme Court)

 

Justices Reject Appeal of Student Arrested for Burping
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court has declined to hear a New Mexico mother’s appeal over her son’s arrest for disrupting his seventh grade gym class with fake burps.
The justices on Monday let stand a lower court ruling that said the police officer who arrested the boy in 2011 was immune from liability.
The appeals court’s ruling drew a sharp dissent from then-Judge Neil Gorsuch just six months before he was picked for the Supreme Court vacancy.
The mother featured Gorsuch’s dissent prominently in her appeal to the Supreme Court. Gorsuch said arresting a “class clown” for burping was going “a step too far.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xk

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xl (Reuters)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yf (Ed Week)

A copy of the 10th Circuit Court ruling
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yg (10th Circuit Court)

 

Texas Latest State to Consider Requiring High School Civics Test
Education Week

Texas is the latest state where lawmakers are considering requiring high school students to pass a civics test in order to graduate from high school.
A bill that asks students to take the test required of those applying to become U.S. citizens passed the state’s House of Representatives last week, according to the Texas Tribune. If the state’s Senate and governor also approve, the citizenship test would replace a current U.S. history test.
At least 15 states have passed similar requirements, as a result of lobbying from the Arizona-based Joe Foss Institute’s Civics Education Initiative. Just last month, Alabama lawmakers also approved adding the citizenship test as a graduation requirement.
The Joe Foss Institute’s initial goal was to have legislation requiring the civics test in all 50 states by September 2017, the 230th anniversary of the U.S. Constitution. That looks unlikely at this point, as at least 10 states haven’t even considered adding the test. But the civics test did gain traction quickly: The first state that created such a requirement was Arizona in 2015.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Xc

 

At 3 a.m., NC Senate GOP strips education funding from Democrats’ districts
Raleigh (NC) News & Observer

N.C. Senate Republicans were visibly upset with Democrats for prolonging the budget debate with amendments during an after-midnight session Friday morning.
As the clock approached 1 a.m., Senate Minority Leader Dan Blue was summoned to the front of the chamber to talk privately with Senate leader Phil Berger. The Senate had rejected five amendments from Democrats to fund their spending priorities, but each time one proposal was shot down, another one was filed.
Senate Rules Chairman Bill Rabon abruptly called for a recess, stopping the proceedings for nearly two hours. GOP leaders headed to a conference room with legislative budget staff, while Democrats – some surprised by the lengthy delay – passed the time with an impromptu dance party in the hall.
The session finally resumed around 3 a.m., and Republican Sen. Brent Jackson introduced a new budget amendment that he explained would fund more pilot programs combating the opioid epidemic. He cited “a great deal of discussion” about the need for more opioid treatment funding.
Jackson didn’t mention where the additional $1 million would come from: directly from education programs in Senate Democrats’ districts and other initiatives the minority party sought.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Y3

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Y4 (WaPo)

 

More States Allow Sunscreen at Schools Without Doctor’s OK
Associated Press

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Susan Grenon makes sure her son is lathered with sunscreen before he leaves for school in the morning, but the fair-skinned 10-year-old can’t bring a bottle to reapply it without a doctor’s note.
Many school systems categorize sunscreen as an over-the-counter medication requiring special paperwork, but several states have been pushing to loosen restrictions to make it easier for kids to protect themselves from skin cancer.
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, a Democrat, signed a bill into law this month allowing students to use sunscreen at school without notes from a doctor and parent. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey, a Republican, enacted a similar measure late last month, following Utah in March. Oregon, Texas and New York have also freed students to use sunscreen in recent years. California did it back in 2002.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yb

 

Michelle Obama slams Trump school lunch rollback, says kids will eat ‘crap’
USA Today

Unsurprisingly, former first lady Michelle Obama isn’t a fan of the Trump administration’s changes to school lunch requirements. Video provided by Newsy Newslook
A fired-up Michelle Obama is defending the nutrition programs she advanced as first lady, saying something is “wrong” when the government doesn’t want kids to eat healthy meals.
In a speech Friday to the Partnerships for a Healthier America conference, Obama did not mention Trump by name but took issue with changes his administration announced last week to ease some of the school nutrition standards she advanced.
“We gotta make sure we don’t let anybody take us back,” the former first lady said. “You have to stop and think, why don’t you want our kids to have good food at school? What is wrong with you? And why is that a partisan issue?”
“Take me out of the equation – like me or don’t like me,” she added. “But think about why someone is OK with your kids eating crap. Why would you celebrate that? Why would you sit idly and be okay with that? Because here’s the secret: If somebody is doing that, they don’t care about your kid.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Y8

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Yc (AP)

 

Barron Trump to Attend Suburban Washington Private School
The 11-year-old is moving with first lady to D.C. this summer
(Washington, DC) Roll Call

President Donald Trump’s son, Barron, will attend St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in Potomac, Maryland, in the fall.
The 11-year-old is currently living in Manhattan with first lady Melania Trump, where he attends Columbia Grammar and Preparatory School on the Upper West Side. The two plan to move to Washington this summer.
“We are very excited for our son to attend St. Andrew’s Episcopal School,” the first lady said in a statement. “It is known for its diverse community and commitment to academic excellence. The mission of St. Andrew’s is ‘to know and inspire each child in an inclusive community dedicated to exceptional teaching, learning, and service,’ all of which appealed to our family. We look forward to the coming school years at St. Andrew’s.”
No other presidential child has ever attended St. Andrews, The Washington Post reported. The school has just under 600 students, from prekindergarten through 12th grade.
It is located 10 minutes outside the Potomac Village town center and roughly 30 minutes from the White House.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Y1

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Y2 (WaPo)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Y7 (USAT)

 

————————————————————
CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

May 16:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

May 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002267.htm

Revenue and Taxation Interim Committee meeting
1:15 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002296.htm

June 1:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 2:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 8:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

June 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

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