Education News Roundup: May 17, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Voices for Utah Children issues a new report on how children of color are faring in the state.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zj (UP)
or a copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zk (Voices for Utah Children)

Ed Week wraps up last week’s ed tech conference in Salt Lake.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zt (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zu (WaPo)

Money being raised through the Park City Education Foundation to help Latino students apply for protections.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0g (PR)

Congratulations to Carbon Supt. Steve Carlsen who will be the new Box Elder superintendent come July.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZC (OSE)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a0d (Tremonton Leader)

Utah looks to spend some of its Volkswagen settlement on new school buses.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zm (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zn (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZO (KTVX)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZT (KSTU)

U.S. House committee advances a new CTE bill.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a03 (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zq (The 74)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a08 (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
or a copy of the bill
http://gousoe.uen.org/a04 (Congress)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Widening disparities, despite some progress, for Utah children of color

Political Policy Questions Tinge Ed-Tech Conference

Push begins to help Park City students apply for DACA protections
Effort aims to spark annual tradition of fundraising

What to do with Volkswagen’s fine? Utah guv says buy new school buses

Carbon School District superintendent tapped to lead Box Elder School District

Alpine School District preparing student data privacy policy

Utah tech leaders weigh in on keeping the boom alive

Working to connect Utah County online in the 21st century, fellows making strides on computer access

County whooping cough rate getting boost from charter
Health » American International School of Utah closes early for spring break.

School board postpones vote on dropping Big Cottonwood Canyon bus service

Heber police issue warning after young teen drinks herself into coma

Program asks parents to take bigger role in preventing underage drinking

Yoga has benefits in the classroom, SL elementary teacher and students say

Running with Ed to run through Park City
Annual event will raise money for local school district

Ogden School District receives United Way honor

Orem NHS member wins scholarship

Diamond Fork Junior students are finalists

Four Iron County educators earn YIC praise

Payson students raise hundreds to honor teacher who died of cancer

Wellsville Milestone: Elementary students keep long-running tradition alive

Davis High football coach Tyler Gladwell steps down to take district position

Nebo School District names new principals

Welding event to feature student work

Burt Brothers Tires & Service Honors Utah Educator

People in Business

Utah Innovator in Education Award Presented at Imagine Learning Open House Ceremony

RizePoint Sends 20 Utah Students To STEM Summer Camps

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Laura Ure

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Leo Sanjinez Guzman

Long and Winding Road: John Lennon-inspired musical bus visits Utah

Officials plan mock traffic accident at Spanish Fork High School

OPINION & COMMENTARY

DeVos visit to Utah revives a really bad idea, school vouchers

Weiler’s Words
Product Liability 101.

To Improve Education in America, Look Beyond the Traditional School Model

Trump takes the classroom out of the lunchroom

School choice will lift up black community
On Brown v. Board anniversary, I ask the NAACP: Whose side are you on?

These 10 States Have Most Education Equality by Race
The gap is smallest in Southeast states, widest in the Far West.

NATION

Career and Technical Education Overhaul Bill Approved by House Ed. Committee

Can a Career Tech Ed. School Be Too Popular?
Elite Career-Tech-Ed. Programs Worry About Limiting Access

New charter schools debate: Are they widening racial divides in public education?

Virtual charter schools wouldn’t be expanded just yet: Texas Senate wants a study first

In Some States, Donating to Private Schools Can Earn You a Profit

For Families With Special Needs, Vouchers Bring Choices, Not Guarantees

Charter backers win their first L.A. school board majority

Districts Moving Away From Desktop Technology in Favor of Mobile, Report Finds

Popular Ed-Tech Platform Edmodo Hacked, Faulted for Ad-Tracking

Jeffco schools to pay new superintendent Jason Glass highest base salary in Colorado
Glass will earn a base salary of $265,000 annually

School Tech: Employer Wrong to Reprimand Me Over Prayer Talk

Little Compton invites out-of-town students to come to the ‘Mayberry of Rhode Island’

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Widening disparities, despite some progress, for Utah children of color

While lawmakers took some important steps toward addressing disparities during the 2017 Legislative Session, a new report by Voices for Utah Children reveals many missed opportunities and reviews the potential impact on children going forward.
The report, released just as the Legislature begins its summer meetings, provides recommendations to advance equity for children of all racial and ethnic backgrounds in Utah.
In the areas reviewed by the report-education, civil liberties and juvenile justice, health and poverty- there are significant social, economic, and health inequities affecting children of color and immigrant children in Utah. For example:
. Latino children are twice as likely (30%) to experience adverse, traumatic or stressful conditions, compared to White children (14%).
. Children of color in Utah make up almost 40% of Title I school enrollees, pre K-12th grade, but account for only 25% of the total child population.
. Native American and Black children are more likely to experience harsh school disciplinary action.
. Women of color are at least 3x less likely to receive timely prenatal care, compared to White women. Babies of mothers who do not get timely prenatal care are at a greater risk for poor health outcomes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zj (UP)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zk (Voices for Utah Children)

 

Political Policy Questions Tinge Ed-Tech Conference

Salt Lake City — Political uncertainty in the federal policy arena hung heavy over the recent ASU/GSV Summit here, an annual event that draws thousands of educational technology executives, developers, and investors, as well as educators.
Among the biggest questions at last week’s conference: How will states implement the Every Student Succeeds Act, and how much leeway will the U.S. Department of Education grant them? Will the Trump administration get the deep cuts it wants to make to the Education Department? And how soon will Congress reauthorize the Higher Education Act-which affects K-12 in myriad ways?
Conference attendees also heard starkly different messages in appearances by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and former Secretary Arne Duncan, who helmed education policy for most of the Obama administration.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zt (Ed Week)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zu (WaPo)

 

Push begins to help Park City students apply for DACA protections
Effort aims to spark annual tradition of fundraising

Moe Hickey believes every student should be given a chance to succeed.
That’s why Hickey, a former Park City school board member who is still active in education efforts, is spearheading an effort to raise $20,000 this spring to help undocumented students apply for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. DACA, implemented under President Obama, protects children who entered the U.S. under the age of 16 from deportation and allows them to apply for work authorization, Social Security numbers and state financial aid for college.
Hickey said he got the idea after several members of the community asked him what they could do to help following a series of local incidents earlier this year that shook the Latino community. The money, he added, will be raised through the Park City Education Foundation, and the effort will hopefully establish an annual tradition.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0g (PR)

 

What to do with Volkswagen’s fine? Utah guv says buy new school buses

Volkswagen will be buying Utah students new, cleaner school buses, Gov. Gary Herbert told fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders at Ensign Elementary School on Tuesday. The state will use $7.5 million in federal settlement money tied to Volkswagen vehicles that cheated emission tests.
It is a move sought by Rep. Steve Handy, R-Layton, who has repeatedly attempted to sponsor legislation intended to replace those buses with cleaner models.
He estimates the cost of a modern bus at roughly $120,000 to $140,000 each. That would mean the state would be able to buy about 60 new ones with the Volkswagen money. To cover the cost of even more buses, Herbert called on Utah school districts to match the state’ contribution to the effort.
Overall, Utah has about 4,500 old, polluting diesel buses still on the roads, Handy said. “There has been a lot of support, but no funding.”
During the past legislative session, Handy sponsored a resolution encouraging Utah to use the Volkswagen settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency on school buses. The money would go to either cleaner-burning diesel models or those that run on compressed natural gas.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zm (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zn (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZO (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZT (KSTU)

 

Carbon School District superintendent tapped to lead Box Elder School District

BRIGHAM CITY – The Carbon School District superintendent has been selected to serve in that same role for the Box Elder School District.
Steve Carlsen was selected over three other finalists: Rich Middle and North Rich Elementary School Principal Kip Motta, Box Elder Assistant Superintendent Darin Nielsen and Wyoming’s Big Horn County School District #2 Superintendent Richard Woodford.
Carlsen will start work July 1, taking over for Ron Tolman who has led the district for three years and plans to retire.
Carlsen has been a superintendent for Utah’s Carbon School District since 2011. Prior to that he was the North Summit School District superintendent in Coalville, Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZC (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a0d (Tremonton Leader)

 

Alpine School District preparing student data privacy policy

Alpine School District will have a data privacy policy by the end of the summer.
The Alpine School District Board of Education saw a draft of the policy during its meeting Tuesday afternoon. Discussion on the policy will continue at its June meeting, and the policy will be approved by July 1.
The policy is in response to state legislation requiring the district to have such a policy by that date.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZF (PDH)

 

Utah tech leaders weigh in on keeping the boom alive

SALT LAKE CITY – Diversity and air quality were at the top of the to-do lists for a group of Utah tech-sector leaders who spoke at an Envision Utah event on Tuesday aimed at exploring what can be done to maintain the trajectory of one of the state’s biggest economic drivers.
In opening comments to the crowd of state and local government leaders, education experts and members of the business community gathered at the Grand America, Envision CEO Robert Grow underscored the powerful role technology and advanced-industries businesses are playing in the state, with growth that’s far outpacing national averages.
“Along the Wasatch Front, half of the new jobs (created since the end of the Great Recession) are in the innovation economy,” Grow said. “These jobs pay better and produce goods and services that are sold outside our state and outside our country.
“They’re like money funnels that bring money into the Utah economy which then ripples through the rest of all of our companies and our jobs,” he said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zo (DN)

 

Working to connect Utah County online in the 21st century, fellows making strides on computer access

With 96 percent of Provo homes connected to the internet, it’s easy to forget about the four percent that aren’t and the things they are missing out on.
Those missed items range from job opportunities, educational chances for them and their families and any number of other things, Jamie Littlefield, United Way of Utah County’s Digital Inclusion Fellow, said.
“I think that digital inclusion is a piece of the puzzle for a lot of the problems our community is facing. It’s not the answer to poverty but it’s a part of the solution to poverty,” she said. “I think so many of us in Provo are really connected . but that means we can forget about people that aren’t connected.”
Last week, United Way of Utah County and several other organizations came together to further promote their message with special events for National Digital Inclusion Week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZG (PDH)

 

County whooping cough rate getting boost from charter
Health » American International School of Utah closes early for spring break.

Salt Lake County health officials hope summer break will run out the clock on a lingering outbreak of pertussis – or whooping cough – at the American International School of Utah.
The outbreak was reported last month, when roughly a dozen cases of pertussis led to 30 unvaccinated AISU students being excluded from classes, and the school closing one day early for its annual spring break.
But the outbreak has since spread to include 32 confirmed or suspected cases of whooping cough, said Salt Lake County Health Department spokesman Nicholas Rupp, putting roughly 180 unvaccinated students at risk for infection.
While symptomatic children have been encouraged to stay home, Rupp said unvaccinated students are no longer being “excluded” – or quarantined – because classes are scheduled to end June 2.
“Now it’s more or less everywhere,” Rupp said. “We’ve elected to not pursue those exclusions and just let the school year play out.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zx (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZM (KUTV)

 

School board postpones vote on dropping Big Cottonwood Canyon bus service

SANDY – The Canyons Board of Education voted Tuesday to postpone a decision whether to end school bus service to Big Cottonwood Canyon in the face of growing safety concerns and dwindling ridership.
The bus route traverses a roadway that Bruce Spiegel, engineering consultant to the Utah State Division of Risk Management, described in a letter to the school district as “unsafe for bus travel.”
In late April, Superintendent James Briscoe recommended that the Canyons Board of Education eliminate the route starting this fall, noting its “inherent safety dangers,” including steep grades, curves, lack of guard rails, narrowness of the road and increasing use by hikers and bicyclists.
Spiegel wrote in a letter to the school district that “there exists a high probability of a serious unfavorable outcome with the Big Cottonwood Canyon route.”
But after hearing from residents of the school district, the school board asked administrators to bring the issue back to the board with more information and options to continue the service, such as contracting with Utah Transit Authority or purchasing smaller vehicles capable of traveling in the steep canyon under winter conditions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zy (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZP (DN via KSL)

 

Heber police issue warning after young teen drinks herself into coma

HEBER CITY – A teenage girl who recently drank herself into a coma was dropped off at a high school, where a student found her lying on the lawn and called 911.
Police say the scare in Heber City should serve as a reminder about the dangers of binge drinking and recreational drug use – and the importance of taking care of people at a party or elsewhere if they see someone struggling.
“Kids need to stay away from it and not think it’s glamorous,” Heber Police Lt. Jason Bradley said of binge drinking.
“If they’re with somebody and they’re overdosing or they’re getting sick or whatever, they need to get them help. Get them go to the doctor. Take them to the hospital,” Bradley said. “If you have a friend that is sick, that is in danger of losing their life, you need to get them help.”
The advice comes on the heels of a high-profile binge drinking incident at Penn State University that led to the death of a fraternity pledge, as well as the Heber City incident that occurred at the end of April.
In that case, a 14-year-old girl and some friends went to a Heber hotel room during school hours and were “chugging” alcohol, Bradley said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zz (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZN (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZQ (DN via KSL)

 

Program asks parents to take bigger role in preventing underage drinking

SALT LAKE CITY – State health officials are asking parents to do the heavy lifting in a new campaign to prevent underage drinking.
Utah first lady Jeanette Herbert helped launch a new campaign Tuesday sponsored by the Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, and the state departments of environmental quality, alcoholic beverage control and human services.
It’s part of the Parents Empowered program, with its main focus on helping parents take a more engaged role in preventing underage drinking. The campaign features several large-scale displays citing important figures and recommendations for preventing alcohol abuse.

The governor’s wife was flanked at a media event launching the campaign by students from Washington Terrace Elementary School and Murray High School’s Peer Leadership Team.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZA (DN)

 

Yoga has benefits in the classroom, SL elementary teacher and students say

SALT LAKE CITY – You can always find a good yoga class at your nearest gym, but what about your nearest elementary school?
Lincoln Elementary School in Salt Lake City is bringing some “karma” into the classroom, and teachers say there are a lot of ways that yoga benefits kids.
Becky Page is a third-grade teacher at Lincoln and said she started doing yoga herself about 12 years ago.
“I noticed the mental and physical effects that it had for me and I wanted that for my students,” said Page.
For the past two years, Page has found instructors like Angela Singh and Dana Baptiste who were willing to teach yoga to her third graders at no cost.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZR (KSL)

 

Running with Ed to run through Park City
Annual event will raise money for local school district

Don’t be alarmed if a zombie, princess, or a skeleton is running down the street on Saturday in Park City.
No, it’s not Halloween, but rather, it’s Running with Ed.
The eighth annual 38-mile, 10-leg relay race, sponsored by Ragnar, is scheduled to take place on Saturday morning. Its course rungs throughout the entire community. The event is run by the Park City Education Foundation and gives participants the opportunity to raise money for the organization.
“The teams that sign up can do team fundraising, and it’s a fundraiser for the Park City Education Foundation, so all proceeds will end up going back into our schools for programs requested by our schools and teachers and students,” the Park City Education Foundation communications manager Jennifer Billow said.
Each year, the Park City Education Foundation aims to invest nearly $1.5 million into various Park City School District programs. Running with Ed supplies about $250,000 of the goal amount.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0j (PR)

 

Ogden School District receives United Way honor

OGDEN – The Ogden School District has been named the United Way of Northern Utah Partner of the Year.
Chief Operating Officer Tim Jackson said the district was selected for the honor because it secured the Partnership for Student Success and worked to foster early-childhood education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZD (OSE)

 

Orem NHS member wins scholarship

Dylan Verbanatz, a senior and member of the National Honor Society at Orem High School, has been named one of 400 national semifinalists in the National Honor Society Scholarship program. Dylan was chosen from more than 9,000 applicants and will receive a $2,325 scholarship.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZJ (PDH)

 

Diamond Fork Junior students are finalists

Taylar Brittain, Cindy Elmer, Jessica Haderlie, and Kiki Conklin along with coach Julie Nance, of Diamond Fork Junior High School in Spanish Fork, Utah have been named national finalists in the second annual Bright Schools Competition.
The competition is a collaborative effort of the National Sleep Foundation and the National Science Teachers Association that encourages students in grades 6-8 to explore the correlation between light and sleep and how it influences student health and performance. “Are Stars in Danger?” is one of 50 national finalist teams, chosen among 150 teams, made up of nearly 500 students from 53 schools. In early May, first-, second- and third-place national winning teams will be announced.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZJ (PDH)

 

Four Iron County educators earn YIC praise

Four Iron County School District educators have been nominated by their peers for their dedication to helping youth overcome challenging life circumstances and reach academic milestones.
Teachers Danelle Black, Leona Schexnayder and Sombryn Williams and counselor Tim Marriott are among 20 statewide nominees of Utah’s American Graduate Champions working with Youth in Care (YIC), the Utah Education Network announced in a news release.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZL (SGS)

 

Payson students raise hundreds to honor teacher who died of cancer

Included in her termination letter is a comment stating Shae Walker intended to return to Park View Elementary School in Payson next school year. She’d worked at the school for 25 years, three of them while she was receiving cancer treatments. The school was more than a job to her, it was one of her favorite places.
“She absolutely loved it,” said Bart Walker, who was married to Shae Walker for 36 years. “Probably one of the hardest things for her to do was get sick enough where she couldn’t go to work.”
Shae Walker, the school’s computer technician who taught computer classes, died in late March from cancer. She worked at the school up until December.
The school had hoped to raise $350 to pay for a personalized paving stone honoring Walker that will be on the Walk of Hope at the Huntsman Cancer Institute in Salt Lake City. The school sold suckers before school and during lunch, and raised the $350 by Wednesday of the week-long fundraiser that happened last week.
The students ended up raising more than $800.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZE (PDH)

 

Wellsville Milestone: Elementary students keep long-running tradition alive

WELLSVILLE – Things weren’t looking promising for nearly 1,100 young runners when a rainstorm rolled through the south end of Cache Valley around 8 a.m. on Tuesday.
Indeed, the weather was ominous, just like the future of the Wellsville Mile was a year ago at this time. There was talk of not bringing the ultra-popular event back for at least a year after the elementary moved to its new location and maybe not bringing it back ever, but that didn’t materialize.
Therefore, it was quite fitting that the rain subsided and gave way to ideal running conditions for the 36th installment of the Wellsville Mile, which started and concluded Tuesday at the old Wellsville Elementary School. The school building closed down after 75 years last May, and the students have been relocated to the former Willow Valley Middle School building.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZK (LHJ)

 

Davis High football coach Tyler Gladwell steps down to take district position

KAYSVILLE – Davis High head football coach Tyler Gladwell is stepping down to take a position with the Davis School District.
Davis athletic director Mylei Zachman confirmed the news to the Standard-Examiner on Tuesday. She said Gladwell will be the curriculum supervisor over physical education and health.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZB (OSE)

 

Nebo School District names new principals

The Nebo School Board of Education recently appointed Ryan Pitcher as Procurement Officer, DeAnn Nielsen as principal of Maple Mountain High School, Heather Balli as Meadow Brook Elementary principal and David Gneiting as the American Disabilities Act & Civil Rights Coordinator.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZJ (PDH)

 

Welding event to feature student work

The Nebo District Welding Event will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on May 20 at the Spanish Fork Fairgrounds.
The bottom line goal for this event is to bridge the gap between the high school welding programs and the need for welders, fabricators, and trendsetters within our society using this skill they acquire in our high school shops. This is a high school event where the students demonstrate their welding and fabricating skills.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZJ (PDH)

 

Burt Brothers Tires & Service Honors Utah Educator

Utah-based Burt Brothers Tire and Service once again recognized outstanding teachers during its Teach Feature program. The tire dealer awarded Sadie Riel a fully paid two-year lease on a new car as the 2017 Teacher Feature winner.
Riel is an EMT/EMR Certification teacher at Granite Technical Institute. As the winner her maintenance during that two-year time is also paid for and Zions Bank awarded her season tickets from Hale Centre Theater, a stay at Anniversary Inn, and dinner at Temple Square’s Roof Restaurant.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0h (Tire Review)

 

People in Business

Many Utah schools recently received an extra boost to end the school year with donations from Macey’s, Lin’s, Dan’s, Dick’s Market and Fresh Market. The Utah-owned grocery stores donated $59,600 to elementary schools as part of the School Cents Program.
Donated funds will be used to purchase a variety of items from classroom supplies to new tablets and computers, depending on the school’s needs.
This is the 17th year the stores have run the School Cents program, which allows guests to donate a portion of their shopping spend to the school of their choice. Schools earn money from August through March before receiving a check during a special presentation at the school with store team members. School Cents has donated more than $624,000 over the last five years to elementary schools across the state.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0c (LHJ)

 

Utah Innovator in Education Award Presented at Imagine Learning Open House Ceremony

PROVO, UT — Imagine Learning, a nationally recognized developer of language, literacy, and mathematics instructional software, has announced the winner of its 2017 Imagine Learning Utah Innovator in Education award. Principal Ernie Broderick of Stansbury Elementary School in Salt Lake City received the award last Thursday during a special open house ceremony held at Imagine Learning’s new corporate headquarters in Provo, Utah.
“Principal Broderick is a champion of both education and helping kids in Utah,” said Jeremy Cowdrey, Executive VP of Sales and Marketing for Imagine Learning. “He exemplifies the kind of leader who really looks out for the general welfare of his students as well as their educational needs. The Utah Innovator in Education Award highlights his great achievements over the past two decades-especially as an advocate of technology in the classroom.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0e (PRWEB)

 

RizePoint Sends 20 Utah Students To STEM Summer Camps

SALT LAKE CITY — RizePoint, the global leader in quality experience management software, awarded scholarships to 20 Canyons School District students for STEM-oriented summer camps as part of the second annual RizePoint STEM Scholarship Awards. Award recipients-9 girls and 11 boys-range from 5th through 10th grade. The awards cover the cost of summer camps in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math, with camps focusing on fields such as robotics or marine science.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0l (PRNewswire)

 

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Laura Ure

Laura Ure is the quintessential teacher is who admired and respected by the Maeser community. She was chosen as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Educator of the Week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZH (PDH)

 

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Leo Sanjinez Guzman

Leo Sanjinez Guzman, a seventh-grade student at Maeser Preparatory Academy, is being recognized as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Student of the Week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZI (PDH)

 

Long and Winding Road: John Lennon-inspired musical bus visits Utah

The John Lennon Educational Tour Bus visited Jackson Elementary School in Salt Lake City on Wednesday.
In its 20th year, the state-of-the-art mobile audio, video and live production facility – named after late Beatles member John Lennon – travels the country, offering young people career-informing tours of its studios and free digital media production workshops.
Students learn how to write, record, and produce original songs as well as music videos and documentaries, as part of the bus’ mission to highlight the importance of the arts and digital-media education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0k (SLT)

 

Officials plan mock traffic accident at Spanish Fork High School

SPANISH FORK, Utah – Officials of Spanish Fork Police Department, Fire & Ambulance, UHP and AirMed are staging a mock traffic accident Wednesday.
The traffic accident is set as a training exercise and will have emergency vehicles, including a helicopter, set for the process at the Spanish Fork High School, Spanish Fork Public Safety said in a Facebook post.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZS (KSTU)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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DeVos visit to Utah revives a really bad idea, school vouchers
Salt Lake Tribune editorial

Talk about refighting the last war.
Apparently, all it took for some folks to start thinking about dusting off the properly rejected idea of using vouchers to send taxpayer money to private schools in Utah was a brief visit from U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.
After the “school choice” champion touched base with folks at an education technology conference in Salt Lake City last week, the movers and shakers behind the 2007 effort to create a system of moving public money to private schools were reportedly moved to take up the battle again.
Please. No.
Been there. Done that.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zl

 

Weiler’s Words
Product Liability 101.
Salt Lake City Weekly commentary by columnist Stan Rosenzweig

After reading my shout-out in last month’s Opinion piece (“Sex Ed,” April 13), Utah State Sen. Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross, tweeted me, “Nice article, except the parts where you completely misrepresent SB 185 and Utah’s current sex ed curriculum.” It turns out he didn’t agree with some of my positions. He is personable, sure. He’s been an on-air guest of Chelsea Handler and laughed off a ribbing from Stephen Colbert. He chairs or is on several Senate committees, and sponsors dozens of bills a year favoring things like fair housing, retirement, low-income tax credits and, notably, pornography and sex education. We cover these last two items in the following conversation:
Weiler: Regarding Bill 185 that just passed, I’m not trying to put any porn companies out of business. Bill 185 creates a cause of action that if a minor has been harmed by pornography, they, or their parents, could sue. It’s like if your kid goes to McDonald’s and orders Chicken McNuggets and finds there is glass inside. We’re saying if the kid was harmed by a product and can prove the harm, then they can get damages. It’s product liability 101. The second part of the bill creates a safe harbor, asking porn distributors to:
1. Make a good-faith attempt to verify the age of their consumers, and we already do this on vaping websites.
2. Make a simple warning that pornography may be harmful to minors.
If the pornography company does those two things, then they are immune from suit in Utah.
Me: My column was about moving sex ed into classrooms, not leave it to kids to find this information from magazines and online.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0f

 

To Improve Education in America, Look Beyond the Traditional School Model
Education Next commentary by Ashley Berner, Deputy Director of the Johns Hopkins Institute for Education Policy

Education debates in the United States often occur between two poles. On the one hand, we have the libertarian impulse, which valorizes free markets, competition, and parental choice; on the other, we find a visceral defense of the district school. Middle paths, such as the urban district portfolio model, combine school choice and government accountability. These three visions for public education generate conflicts that are politically charged, and carry high stakes in terms of legitimacy and financial support.
But these conflicts operate within the same conceptual framework: Public education is the neighborhood school, and all alternatives must be justified against it-if they are to be supported at all. The result is entrenched competition between entire school sectors, such as charter versus district, public versus private. Every time we read, “Vouchers don’t work,” or “Charter schools take funding from public schools,” we see evidence of the underlying framework. District schools are the cultural norm; charter schools and private-school-scholarship programs assert legitimacy on the basis of superior academic results.
This construct is historically contingent. In fact, our school systems used to fund a variety of diverse schools. Most democracies still do. Our systems are “uniform,” theirs are “plural.” Uniformity here does not mean similitude of resources, content, and outcomes, but rather uniformity of culture and of delivery.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a07

 

Trump takes the classroom out of the lunchroom
(Washington, DC) The Hill op-ed by MICHAEL ROSENBAUM, Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine at the Columbia University Medical Center

The Trump administration is endeavoring to transform the school lunchroom from a learning environment into a junk food emporium. A recent announcement by Agricultural Secretary Sonny Perdue marking the shift would have been front page news if not eclipsed by the GOP’s attempt to eviscerate the Affordable Care Act.
Perdue is proposing that we cut back standards of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. School meals won’t have to provide food calorie labels, reduce salt, use as much fat-free milk and contain more whole grains. Perdue – backed by Rep. Robert Aderholt , (R-Ala.) who also chairs the subcommittee determining school nutrition funding – claims that these cuts would make “school meals great again.” They say that relaxation of these standards is necessary to reduce costs, because kids don’t like the meals, and to block another attempt by the government “to dictate to local school systems.”
Are the costs are so high, the food so inedible, and Michelle Obama’s interest in preventing childhood and adult obesity so invasive as to justify stopping a program that has been shown to improve children’s diets and academic performance?
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zw

 

School choice will lift up black community
On Brown v. Board anniversary, I ask the NAACP: Whose side are you on?
USA Today op-ed by T. Willard Fair, president and chief executive officer of the Urban League of Greater Miami, Inc.

I was in high school when Brown v. Board of Education was decided 63 years ago.
That makes me an old man, one who was at the forefront of the civil rights movement during its most tumultuous days.
I took the fight for equality to South Florida, joining the Miami Urban League in 1963 and becoming its CEO at the age of 24. There I met Martin Luther King, Jr., and from that inspiration took on a power structure that through practice, if not written policy, dictated what black people were and were not allowed to do.
We succeeded in overcoming that by developing young black leaders, by refusing to accept subservience, by rejecting incremental gains and, instead, demanding full inclusion. This is the same formula that brought change to communities across this nation.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZV

 

These 10 States Have Most Education Equality by Race
The gap is smallest in Southeast states, widest in the Far West.
U.S. News & World Report analysis by columnist Gaby Galvin

On May 17, 1954 the U.S. Supreme Court handed down the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision, which overturned the idea of “separate but equal” public schools a doctrine established in the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson case. The decision called for the desegregation of schools and was a major spark for the civil rights movement of the 1960s.
However a racial gap in education is still prevalent today — in 2015, whites and Asians over 25 years old held significantly more bachelor’s degrees than minority groups. The average gap in the U.S. overall is about 50 percent between the groups — about 36 percent of whites and Asians have earned at least a bachelor’s degree, while 18 percent of minorities have earned them. The gap is calculated by dividing the minority bachelor’s degree rate by the majority’s rate for each state.
The gap is exacerbated in the Far West, where 41 percent of whites and Asians and 15 percent of minorities hold at least a bachelor’s. The gap is smallest in Southeast states — 31 percent of whites and Asians and about 20 percent of minorities earned a bachelor’s degree or higher. And Kansas, the state that spurred the Brown V. Board case, doesn’t even crack the list, with 25 percent of whites and Asians and 17 percent of minorities earning at least a bachelor’s degree.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a06

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Career and Technical Education Overhaul Bill Approved by House Ed. Committee
Education Week

Washington — The House education committee approved a bipartisan bill to reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act on Wednesday.
The Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act, with Rep. Glenn Thompson, R-Pa., and Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi as the lead co-sponsors, passed unanimously out of the committee. It now moves to the full House for consideration, and could become the first major education legislation sent to President Donald Trump during this Congress.
Rep. Virginia Foxx, R-N.C., the committee chairwoman, and Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., the top Democrat, both said there is a skills gap between what students are provided in educational settings and the demands of the current workforce.
“This legislation will empower state and local leaders to tailor programs to meet the unique needs” of students in their community, Foxx said in the Wednesday committee meeting. “Local leaders will be better equipped to respond to changing education and economic needs.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/a03

http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zq (The 74)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a08 (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)

A copy of the bill
http://gousoe.uen.org/a04 (Congress)

 

Can a Career Tech Ed. School Be Too Popular?
Elite Career-Tech-Ed. Programs Worry About Limiting Access
Education Week

Highlands, N.J. — On a chilly spring morning, 18 teenagers clamber aboard a 65-foot research vessel and become marine scientists. In big blue nets, they haul in an array of sparkling, spiny, wiggly sea creatures. They identify each one, carefully measure it, and toss it back into the water. The data they collect will help state officials monitor ocean life and oversee commercial fishing licenses.
It’s the chance of a lifetime, but it’s also a regular part of students’ experience at their elite public high school, the Marine Academy of Science and Technology. It’s a full-time career-and-technical-education program offered by a countywide vocational district. Acceptance rates at MAST rival those at some of the most selective universities. Seats are coveted for good reason: They funnel students into impressive colleges, and jobs in marine science, engineering, and other fields.
With few exceptions, however, the only students who get to benefit from this powerhouse program are white. Only 8 percent are Hispanic or Asian. None are black. Only 6 percent of MAST’s 290 students are from low-income families, even though 37 percent of New Jersey’s students live in poverty.
Equitable access to high-quality career-and-technical-education programs is a thorny issue that’s getting attention as CTE experiences a resurgence of support from policymakers who consider it an overlooked avenue to higher education and the job market.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zr

 

New charter schools debate: Are they widening racial divides in public education?
Washington Post

VACHERIE, La. – At the new public charter school in this Mississippi River town, nearly all students are African American. Parents seem unconcerned about that. They just hope their children will get a better education.
“I wanted my girls to soar higher,” said Alfreda Cooper, who is black and has two daughters at Greater Grace Charter Academy.
Three hours up the road, students at Delta Charter School in Concordia Parish are overwhelmingly white, even though the surrounding community is far more mixed.
As the charter school movement accelerates across the country, a critical question remains unanswered – whether the creation of charters is accelerating school segregation. Federal judges who oversee desegregation plans in Louisiana are wrestling with that issue at a time when President Trump wants to spend billions of dollars on charter schools, vouchers and other “school choice” initiatives.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zs

 

Virtual charter schools wouldn’t be expanded just yet: Texas Senate wants a study first
Dallas Morning News

AUSTIN – Texas’ move to greatly expand virtual charter schools despite their lackluster performance was significantly scaled back Tuesday.
Sen. Don Huffines, R-Dallas, had sought to offer the digital school option to students in kindergarten through second grade to give families options that work for them.
But various education advocates have warned against expanding the charters because they have shown poor student achievement across the state and the nation. One major 2015 study found that kids in virtual charter schools lost up to a year’s worth of math education and almost a semester of reading.
Huffines changed his bill to have the state study the impact and feasibility of expanding online learning to those grades. The bill, which passed 22-8, would require a report on findings before the next legislative session.
Virtual school supporters say the flexibility allows for them to meet their children’s needs, particularly when dealing with health concerns or bullying.
Advocates for traditional public schools worry about expanding virtual charters to kindergarten through second grade because those students don’t take state tests, so there’s no accountability system to evaluate their performance.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9Zv

 

In Some States, Donating to Private Schools Can Earn You a Profit
New York Times

In Georgia, taxpayers who want to help low­income students afford private school tuition are enticed by more than just an appeal to their good will. On its website, Whitefield Academy, a “Christ­centered” preparatory school in the suburbs west of Atlanta, tells donors, “You actually stand to make money on this program.”
The Wood Acres School, 25 minutes north of Whitefield, advertises that donors can “profit up to 29 percent” on their donation.
And Pay It Forward Scholarships, an organization that doles out grants under Georgia’s tax credit program, counsels, “You will end with more money than when you started, and you will be helping students receive a good education.”
AASA, the association of the nation’s public school superintendents, released an exhaustive report Wednesday on tax credit scholarship programs like Georgia’s, which allow donors to piggyback on state and federal tax breaks – often to turn a profit.
The superintendents warned that the tax credits could go national as the Trump administration pushes a federal voucher program for private schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a09

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0a (AASA)

 

For Families With Special Needs, Vouchers Bring Choices, Not Guarantees
NPR Morning Edition


Helping kids like Ayden find a better fit is exactly why vouchers for special-needs students were created. There are 20 of these programs around the country, but the McKay Scholarship program in Florida is the largest, and one of the oldest. Given his diagnoses, Ayden is eligible for about $11,000 a year to attend a private school.
But there’s a catch. For the past eight months, Ayden’s mom has not been able to find a school within driving distance that will accept him. “They talk about McKay like it’s this great thing, but talk to these private schools and as soon as I say ‘behavioral issues,’ they’ll tell you that they can’t accommodate him,” Lynn says.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZU

 

Charter backers win their first L.A. school board majority
Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles Unified School District underwent a dramatic political shift Tuesday night, as the curtain dropped on what has been the most expensive school board election in the nation’s history.
The election has been a proxy war between wealthy charter school advocates and public employee unions. Charter supporters appeared to secure their first-ever majority on the seven-member Los Angeles Board of Education, a move that could accelerate the already-rapid expansion of charter schools across the city.
Election day brought to an end a more than $14-million campaign fueled by outside spending. The latest figures show charter supporters outspent their union opponents. But union spending, mainly under the banner of United Teachers Los Angeles, also reached into the millions.
The president of the school board, Steve Zimmer, conceded his race. Addressing a crowd of supporters, Zimmer called his loss to candidate Nick Melvoin “devastating” and vowed never to run for office again. In a sign of how deeply polarizing this election has been, and how difficult it will be to forge consensus in the weeks and months to come, Zimmer said he would not call Melvoin.
“I may have lost an election . but my soul is intact,” he said. Of his opponent’s supporters, he added darkly: “They know what they did.”
Returns showed charter-backed Kelly Gonez, 28, leading against her union-supported opponent, Imelda Padilla, 29, in the race to fill a vacant seat in District 6. The district encompasses the east Valley. Both candidates were running to replace Monica Ratliff, who did not seek reelection.
Just after midnight, Gonez declared victory.
In District 4, where Zimmer faced a challenge from Melvoin, charter school advocates spent millions of dollars to unseat the incumbent. The district stretches from the Westside to the west San Fernando Valley.
The record level of cash contributed to the blistering campaigns, in which both sides sought to sow division among public school parents, teachers and advocates.
For residents who aren’t devoted followers of district politics, discerning exactly who the candidates were was difficult.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a05

 

Districts Moving Away From Desktop Technology in Favor of Mobile, Report Finds
Education Week

The mobile education technology cart might be edging out the computer lab in many districts, according to a new analysis by the Education Week Research Center.
Based on a survey of more than 1,000 district administrators and teachers, the center found Google Chromebooks were used more frequently in day-to-day instruction than all PC and Apple desktop and laptop computers combined:
Moreover, education staff said they expected to invest more in tablet computers-and to a lesser extent laptops-than in desktop technology for the classroom.
The results come as many large-scale assessments, such as the National Assessment of Education Progress, move into tablet-based formats. What does it mean for education research? For those in the field, it could make data collection easier, as it can be easier to collect metadata on how students are engaging with material through touch-pad technology. Yet many districts do not have clear privacy protocols on how app-based programs collect and use students’ data, which could create landmines for researchers hoping to work with schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a00

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/a01 (Ed Week)

 

Popular Ed-Tech Platform Edmodo Hacked, Faulted for Ad-Tracking
Education Week

It’s been a tough few days for Edmodo.
Last Thursday, Motherboard broke news that the popular classroom-learning platform was the victim of a hack that led to tens of million of users’ account details (including email addresses) being put up for illicit sale on the so-called ‘dark web’ (a section of the internet that requires special software to access and allows users to remain anonymous):
“A vendor going under the name of nclay is currently listing the Edmodo data on the dark web marketplace Hansa for just over $1,000. In all, nclay claims to have 77 million accounts, and according to LeakBase, around 40 million include an email address. (Motherboard has not seen the full alleged database).
“The accounts were stolen last month according to nclay’s dark web listing. The vendor did not respond to a request for clarification.”
Edmodo soon posted a response, saying they were investigating the hack and did not believe users’ passwords had been compromised.
Just two days later, however, education privacy researcher Bill Fitzgerald published a blog post detailing what he described as Edmodo’s practice of tracking students’ and teachers’ activity on their web-based platform, then sending the information to data brokers:
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZZ

 

Jeffco schools to pay new superintendent Jason Glass highest base salary in Colorado
Glass will earn a base salary of $265,000 annually
Denver Post

GOLDEN – All five members of the Jefferson County Public Schools Board of Education voted Tuesday afternoon to name Jason Glass the new superintendent of Colorado’s second-largest school district, awarding him a $265,000-a-year pay package – the highest base salary of any superintendent in the state.
“It’s time for us to set a new course,” said board member Brad Rupert to a mostly full room at district headquarters in Golden.
The reception in the room for Glass – steady applause and a standing ovation – couldn’t have been more different than what greeted outgoing superintendent Dan McMinimee when he took the same job three years ago under a completely different board. That night in 2014, people in the audience derided McMinimee for what they claimed was a lack of experience and credentials, and two members of the board voted against hiring him.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0b

 

School Tech: Employer Wrong to Reprimand Me Over Prayer Talk
Associated Press

AUGUSTA, Maine — A high school worker filed a federal complaint Tuesday against her school district, saying officials were being discriminatory when they reprimanded her for telling a co-worker that she’d pray for him.
Toni Richardson, a special education technician, contends she was “interrogated” by school officials about the remark in which she intended to offer encouragement to a colleague who goes to her church. She was later warned against using “phrases that integrate public and private belief systems.”
“The school reprimanded me because my words, spoken privately to a colleague, involved religious content,” she wrote in her complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZW

 

Little Compton invites out-of-town students to come to the ‘Mayberry of Rhode Island’
Providence (RI) Journal

LITTLE COMPTON, R.I. – Wanted: students from out of town to attend school in Little Compton, a bucolic waterfront community with stone walls, rolling pastures and a historic town green.
With enrollment in the Wilbur & McMahon School on the decline, the tiny school district, population 249, decided to advertise its charms. By pricing tuition at $6,000 – less than the typical parochial school – the district hopes to attract students from neighboring Portsmouth, Tiverton, Middletown and Westport, Mass.
The district sends its high school students to Portsmouth.
“If I’m sitting in Portsmouth or Tiverton, I’m going to say, ‘I can get my kid into a class where the student-teacher ratio is 14 to 1, where the school has music, choir, band, athletics, where we go on field trips to New York and Washington, D.C.,” said Supt. Robert B. Powers.
“This is a K-8 school,” he said. “Kids don’t grow up quite as fast in a K-8 school. It’s the Mayberry of Rhode Island.”
There is no danger of closing the Wilbur & McMahon School, Robert said, but the School Committee is simply taking a proactive stand.
“This is a way to bring in tuition,” Robert said. “Twelve thousand dollars gives us the opportunity to buy Chromebooks. It’s an opportunity for more field trips.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZX

http://gousoe.uen.org/9ZY (AP)

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

May 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002267.htm

Revenue and Taxation Interim Committee meeting
1:15 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002296.htm

May 18:

Federal Funds Commission meeting
3 p.m., 210 Senate Building
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002388.htm

June 1:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 2:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 8:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

June 20:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

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