Education News Roundup: May 18, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

The Trib and Channel 4 look at pay raises for Utah teachers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0t (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a0P (KTVX)

Educators and others are looking at some of the changes in Utah’s juvenile justice system.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a16 (DN)

Students from several Utah schools will be speaking with astronauts aboard the International Space Station on Friday.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a1d (NASA)

Longtime Granite Board Member Sarah Meier is stepping down.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0E (DN)

The Trump administration is scheduled to release its proposed education budget on Monday. Early reports show an emphasis on school choice measures.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0u (WaPo)
Sidebar: 5 key questions http://gousoe.uen.org/a0W (WaPo)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a0v (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a12 (Chalkbeat)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a14 (Politico)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a1c (The Hill)

Ed Week looks at how often restraint and seclusion are used in schools nationally.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0Z (Ed Week)

GAO releases its report on the Bureau of Indian Education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0x (The 74)
or a copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0y (GAO)

Some advice this graduation season? Don’t save seats. It can turn ugly really quick.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0X (Memphis Commercial Appeal)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

More Utah school districts approve pay hikes for educators
Education » Slowed hiring fuels higher-compensation proliferation; Davis, Murray and Alpine draft salary plans akin to other districts’.

Juvenile justice reforms stirring concerns among educators, law enforcement

Utah Legislature continues wrestling with tax reform, possible food tax hike
Interim committee » Lawmakers resume effort to tinker with the Utah code.

Utah Students to Speak to NASA Astronauts on International Space Station

Granite School board seeking applicants for Taylorsville-area vacancy

Hildale successes continue as graduation week nears

More than 50 years later, Mundelein H.S. grants diploma to Vietnam veteran

Do you recognize any of these 2017 Sterling Scholar winners?

Edith Bowen students turn fascination with construction into dance

Preston sixth-graders blasted with science

Layton Christian Academy theater club flourishes under new leadership

Two Utah students who won leadership competition are headed to nationals
The students presented projects involving cheese science

Carbon School District awards outstanding achievers

Outstanding Employee Utah Catholic Schools

Carlsen to depart Carbon District for new job in Box Elder County

Governor Signs Clean Air Resolutions At SLC School

Mom: Provo school overlooked fractured wrist

Kilburn family seeks support for Syracuse crossing bridge from Davis schools

Morgan County warning students to stop ‘sexting’ or face charges

Man faces felony charges after dropping heavily intoxicated teen girls off outside Utah school

Hidden Oaks principal steered school donations to son’s charity drive

Whooping Cough outbreak at Murray charter school
More than 30 cases at the school over the last month

Graduation 2017: High school ceremony dates, times, locations in Northern Utah

Springville students help put books in Uganda schools

Spanish Fork High student orchestrates mock crash to demonstrate DUI dangers

Bike to school day hosted

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Hindus urge all Utah schools to offer yoga like some Salt Lake City schools

DeVos has a lot to learn about education and race

NATION

Trump’s first full education budget: Deep cuts to public school programs in pursuit of school choice

NASA Budget Cuts: Senators Urge Trump Not To Slash Agency’s Office Of Education

70,000 Students With Disabilities Secluded, Restrained in School
But Rates Can Vary Widely From District to District

Bureau of Indian Education Dressed Down in Senate Hearing

School Infrastructure Spending Plan Introduced by House Democrats

National law firm says Parkland violating law in rejecting pro-life student club

Do Fidget Spinners Belong in the Classroom? Teachers Are Divided

‘Choking game’ resulted in Bernards student’s death

Arlington High graduation fight: Brawl erupts among adults during ceremonies

 

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UTAH NEWS
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More Utah school districts approve pay hikes for educators
Education » Slowed hiring fuels higher-compensation proliferation; Davis, Murray and Alpine draft salary plans akin to other districts’.

Administrators in the Davis, Murray and Alpine school districts signed off on teacher raises this week, adding to a cascade of new salary plans that will boost the pay for Utah’s public school educators next year.
School board members for Davis and Alpine – Utah’s two largest school districts – voted Tuesday for compensation packages that include cost-of-living adjustments and the funding of scheduled salary increases, commonly known as “steps and lanes.” And on Monday, the Murray Board of Education approved a salary package that boosts teacher pay by an average of more than 11 percent.
All three districts also lifted their starting salary levels above $40,000, adding to what has become a new pay floor for teachers in Utah’s major school districts.
In a prepared statement, Davis School Board President John Robison said a world-class education requires that schools attract and retain the best educators.
“The impact a great teacher makes can never be underestimated,” Robison said, “and we want that to be reflected in a teacher’s compensation.”
For several years, public school representatives have warned of a growing teacher shortage as districts have struggled to fill open staffing positions while facing a shrinking number of education graduates from Utah’s higher-education system.
The shortage is often attributed to low pay and a shortage of school resources in the state, which ranks last in the nation for per-student education spending.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0t (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a0P (KTVX)

 

Juvenile justice reforms stirring concerns among educators, law enforcement

SALT LAKE CITY – With an Aug. 1 implementation looming, some Utah educators are concerned about the practical implications of a new initiative that substantially changes how youths are treated in the juvenile justice system.
One significant change is that schools will no longer be able to refer students to law enforcement or juvenile court for truancy or school-based status offenses, infractions or class C misdemeanors that occur on school grounds. Instead, the issues are to be handled by the schools themselves, peer courts or other diversion approaches.
Backers of sweeping reforms to the state’s juvenile justice system, which were adopted by Utah lawmakers with the passage of HB239 earlier this year, say the initiative will save money and result in better outcomes for youths.
The legislation includes recommendations of the Utah Juvenile Justice Working Group, which was made up of juvenile court judges, attorneys, legislators, state department heads and others appointed by Gov. Gary Herbert.
But legislators, educators, law enforcement, child welfare workers, prosecutors and others indicated during a recent meeting in Cache County that the sea change of laws and practices is worrisome, said Sen. Lyle Hillyard, R-Logan.
“How in the world can a school district that’s fighting like crazy to keep their teachers, trying to fund salary increases and those problems, dealing with suicide prevention, all of the crises, problems public ed has, now we suddenly thrust this back on them?” Hillyard said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a16 (DN)

 

Utah Legislature continues wrestling with tax reform, possible food tax hike
Interim committee » Lawmakers resume effort to tinker with the Utah code.

Lawmakers made clear during a hearing Wednesday they’re looking at every aspect of Utah’s revenue stream – including a higher sales tax on food – in an effort to protect state services from cuts during future downturns.
But, after abandoning a tax reform push in the legislative session earlier this year, they still are struggling to settle on a concrete plan.
Members of the Legislature’s Revenue and Taxation Interim Committee heard from Senate President Wayne Niederhauser, who said those working on the issue had looked at every option.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0B (SLT)

 

Utah Students to Speak to NASA Astronauts on International Space Station

WASHINGTON — Utah students will speak with NASA astronauts living and working aboard the International Space Station at 12:40 p.m. EDT Friday, May 19. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.
Expedition 51 Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Jack Fischer, both of NASA, will speak with students gathered at Utah State University’s (USU) Space Dynamics Laboratory in North Logan, Utah. The event will be hosted by USU in partnership with U.S. Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah.
Whitson launched to the space station Nov. 17, 2016. Fischer launched to the station in April. Both astronauts are scheduled to return to Earth in September.
Hatch plans to attend the event. He will speak with the students and then open the call to the astronauts. All participating students are focusing their education in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

The following Utah schools will attend the event:

  • InTech Collegiate High School, North Logan (grades 8-12)
  • Logan High School, Logan (grades 9-12)
  • Mount Logan Middle School, Logan (grades 6-8)
  • North Sanpete Middle School, Moroni (grades 7-8)
  • Uintah High School, Vernal (grades 10-12)
  • Wendover High School, Wendover (grades 10-12)

The following Utah schools are slated to watch the downlink on NASA TV:

  • Dual Immersion Academy, Salt Lake City
  • Edith Bowen Laboratory School, Logan
  • Ephraim Middle School, Ephraim
  • Wendover Junior High School, Wendover

http://gousoe.uen.org/a1d (NASA)

 

Granite School board seeking applicants for Taylorsville-area vacancy

SOUTH SALT LAKE – Sarah Meier, longtime member of the Granite School District Board of Education for the Taylorsville and Kearns area, is resigning from the school board to serve a church mission with her husband.
The school district is accepting applications to fill the Precinct 4 position resulting from her resignation after serving 20 years on the school board. The term ends in 2018.
The precinct covers large portions of Taylorsville and Kearns and includes Taylorsville High School, Kearns High School, Bennion Junior High and several elementary schools.
Anyone interested in filling Meier’s unexpired term can apply to the superintendent’s office before 5 p.m. on Friday, June 2.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0E (DN)

 

Hildale successes continue as graduation week nears

As high school seniors across Southern Utah prepare to take that big step through their schools’ symbolic portals into the world of adult responsibilities, Hildale is once again celebrating noteworthy advances within a community that for years turned its back on public education.
Two years ago, Danny Jessop was in a class by himself – the first and only student graduating from the newly-minted Water Canyon School that his land-owning father had helped welcome into the largely polygamous community to fill an educational void that had existed for well over a decade.
Last year, four students walked at commencement and two others were also able to complete graduation requirements after the high school classes separated from the elementary and moved into their own building next door.
This year, “25 or 26” graduates are expected to receive their diplomas in Water Canyon High School’s gym, Principal Darrin Thomas said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0N (SGS)

 

More than 50 years later, Mundelein H.S. grants diploma to Vietnam veteran

More than 50 years after leaving Mundelein High School and eventually heading to Vietnam, Stanley Spooner walked onstage and received his high school diploma.
The May 14 graduation ceremony at the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates featured 498 Mundelein High School graduates, including the 68-year-old Spooner.
Spooner said his father was in the Navy and his family relocated many times throughout his childhood, enough that he was held back two years. Spooner attended Mundelein High School while his father worked at the Great Lakes Naval Base in North Chicago.
A desire to follow family tradition and serve in the military came into conflict with getting his high school diploma when the United States government began talking about a draft.
“I pre-enlisted in the summer of 1965,” Spooner said. “I was about to be an 18-year-old high school sophomore through no fault of my own. I wanted to be what I wanted to be, not what they wanted me to be. Instead of risk being drafted into general infantry I signed up to be a marine, like my maternal grandfather.”
Spooner and his company were sent to Vietnam on July 31, 1967, according to his personal records. Officials at Mundelein High School said Spooner would have been part of the 1968 graduating class.

Now living in Utah, Spooner said an official from the Salt Lake Community College was at that job fair and decided to help. Spooner said the college discovered federal laws that allow veterans to work with the high schools they dropped out of.
Salt Lake Community College contacted Mundelein High School’s registrar, according to school records.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a19 (Chicago Tribune)

 

Do you recognize any of these 2017 Sterling Scholar winners?

Since 1962, Deseret News has honored exceptional high school seniors. Deseret Management Corp. has continued the tradition 55 years later, offering scholarships to the students through the Sterling Scholar program.
Deseret News and KSL Broadcast Group directly administer the Wasatch Front Region, one of five throughout the state. The other regions where the Sterling Scholar program is independently implemented are Central Utah, Northeast Utah, Southeast Utah and Southwest Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0C (DN)

Sidebar: candidates
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0D (DN)

Sidebar: Southeast region
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0F (DN)

 

Edith Bowen students turn fascination with construction into dance

Students at Edith Bowen Laboratory School this academic year have been mesmerized at the sight of a new building going up next door.
The construction absorbed their playground, so some students have been standing along the fence during recess watching cranes soar overhead as welders spray sparks below.
“They really have been fascinated by this all year long,” EBLS Assistant Principal Julie Moeller said.
In the spirit of EBLS, the charter school on the campus of USU that specializes in place-based education, the music teacher and the dance teacher teamed up to take advantage of a real-life opportunity for education.
On Tuesday, 100 first and second graders performed songs and dances for construction workers and parents with the unfinished building as the backdrop.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0L (LHJ)

 

Preston sixth-graders blasted with science

Two science teachers stood in line at Walmart, waiting to purchase items for classroom experiments.
It sounds like the start of a bad joke, but that’s exactly how the sixth-grade class of Preston Junior High ended up with a field trip and science demonstration at USU.
Chemistry professor Doug Harris was buying several bags of Jet-Puffed marshmallows when the cashier asked why he needed so many. He explained that he is a chemist and planned to use the marshmallows not for gastronomic pleasure, but for science.
Meanwhile, Preston Junior High science teacher Camille Jensen was buying flowers for a dissection experiment when she overheard Harris. She struck a conversation and eventually ended up scheduling a science demonstration and field trip for her students.
“It’s funny how things work out,” Jensen said.
As a result of this interaction, 100 sixth-grade students on Wednesday saw exploding balloons, strange potions, a vortex cannon, a Tesla coil and several chemical reactions that had students cheering.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0K (LHJ)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a0M (CVD)

 

Layton Christian Academy theater club flourishes under new leadership

LAYTON – There were fewer than a dozen high school students interested in theater and drama when Michael Wright arrived at Layton Christian Academy five years ago.
Wright wasn’t going to stand for that.
“Without arts, truthfully, I wouldn’t really have a place in life,” he said. “I’m not a science guy. I’m not a math guy. I just don’t know how it kind of gets eliminated. It’s so important.”
This year, about 70 high school students – 32 percent of the entire high school’s enrollment – were involved in what Wright has named the Layton Christian Drama Company. That includes enrollment in two theater classes and a theater tech course.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0G (OSE)

 

Two Utah students who won leadership competition are headed to nationals
The students presented projects involving cheese science

Two Utah students who submitted projects involving cheese science, were presented with scholarships to compete in the national Future, Career, and Community Leaders of America competition to be held in Tennessee by The Utah Education Network and Harmons Grocer’s on Tuesday.
The winners of the FCCLA Students Taking Action with Recognition competition were Cecily Clark, a student at Morgan High school who won 1st place with her entry “Focus on the Child” and Hailey Gomm, Canyon View Junior High School student, who won 2nd place with her entry “Career Investigation”.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0T (KTVX)

 

Carbon School District awards outstanding achievers

Carbon School District last week honored its high-achieving students and retiring employees, and awarded individuals who have contributed greatly to education.
On May 8 the Student Awards Banquet was held with sponsorship from the Eastern Utah Community Credit Union. More than 200 awards were handed out to students who have excelled in academics, technical fields and at regional and state competitions in the past school year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a1f (Price Sun Advocate)

 

Outstanding Employee Utah Catholic Schools

Utah Catholic Schools held the 2017 Outstanding Employee Dinner on April 26 at the Marriott Hotel City Center. At the event, the following people were recognized:
http://gousoe.uen.org/a1g (IC)

 

Carlsen to depart Carbon District for new job in Box Elder County

Carbon School District Superintendent Steve Carlsen will leave his job here to become the superintendent of Box Elder County School District in northern Utah. His resignation is effective June 30.
Carlsen will replace Ron Tolman, who will retire this summer.
“I have loved working in Carbon County with both the school district and in getting to know the community,” Carlsen said Tuesday. “This move is not about this district. It is about opportunity.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/a1b (Price Sun Advocate)

 

Governor Signs Clean Air Resolutions At SLC School

Salt Lake City, UT – Governor Herbert wants to encourage Utahns to do more to help keep smog out of the air. The governor went to Ensign Elementary School yesterday to sign two resolutions that he feels will help reduce the number of poor air-quality days in the state. One resolution encourages Utahns to buy cars with better smog ratings, while the other encourages school districts to buy natural gas-powered buses. The governor announced yesterday that the state would dedicate over seven-million-dollars in additional money from the Volkswagen settlement toward buying those buses.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0V (MUR)

 

Mom: Provo school overlooked fractured wrist

Provo, Utah – A Provo mom is upset with Amelia Earhart Elementary school staff after her first grader fractured his wrist during recess and nobody called her.
Provo City School District spokesperson Caleb Price said Cahle Kinsey fell from the top of a slide during morning recess. He went to the medical clerk’s office to get checked out and they thought he was OK. They gave him ice and sent him back to class.
“As the health clerk examined the student’s wrist, there was no swelling, there was no redness. The student was able to move his wrist. He wasn’t in extreme pain. At no point did he ask to call home,” Price said. “They can ask to call home. We’ll never say no to calling home.”
Caleb returned to the office several times throughout the school day.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0O (KUTV)

 

Kilburn family seeks support for Syracuse crossing bridge from Davis schools

FARMINGTON – The Davis School District Board of Education president and superintendent voiced support for the family seeking to build a walking bridge where a teenager was killed in a crosswalk.
Dakota Kilburn, a ninth-grade student at Syracuse Junior High School, was killed in April at a crosswalk where the Utah Department of Transportation already had plans to install a lighted crossing signal as part of a road-widening project.
At a meeting Tuesday, May 16, Dakota’s father and a family friend asked the school board for their support in asking the UDOT to build a walking bridge instead.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0H (OSE)

 

Morgan County warning students to stop ‘sexting’ or face charges

MORGAN COUNTY, Utah – Morgan County authorities are warning students to stop “sexting.”
The Morgan County Sheriff’s Office said it has learned the requesting and sending of nude photos among Morgan High School students has become a problem.
The sheriff’s office said in a Facebook post, “These behaviors are in violation of State law. If you have not talked to your children about these issues, please talk to them. If you have already talked to them, then talk to them again.”
Deputies are also warning students of the immediate consequences:
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0U (KSTU)

 

Man faces felony charges after dropping heavily intoxicated teen girls off outside Utah school

HEBER, Utah – A 19-year-old Heber man faces third-degree felony charges after admitting to police that he gave a 14-year-old and a 16-year-old girl alcohol.
Police say Andreu Holmes picked the teens up and brought them over to a Holiday Inn Express Hotel.
“They got drunk,” said Officer Xela Thomas of Heber City Police. “They were binge drinking.”
Police say Holmes told them that he left the girls in the hotel room while he went to the hospital. He said that when he came back, he discovered the two teens had drunk everything.
“They were drinking a lot of alcohol and very fast,” Thomas added. “It’s going to get deadly, and in this case, it almost was.”
Instead of taking the girls to the hospital, police say Holmes dropped them in front of Wasatch High School. Neither of the girls were students there.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0R (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a0S (KTVX)

 

Hidden Oaks principal steered school donations to son’s charity drive

The principal of Hidden Oaks Elementary steered $1,300 from school fundraisers to an out-of-town charity drive organized by her son without disclosing her family connection to the event, an investigation by the Palm Beach County School Board’s inspector general has found.
The inspector general found no evidence that Principal Sari Myers violated school district policies or that her son benefited financially from the arrangement, but investigators concluded that she failed to “fully disclose to her staff the purpose of the fundraiser event.”
The issue came to the attention of school district administrators via an anonymous letter in February from an employee at the suburban Boynton Beach school, who said that using school fundraisers to aid her son’s fundraising efforts for a University of Florida dance marathon diverted potential contributions from the school’s annual safety patrol trip to Washington D.C.
“We thought it was odd we were fundraising for Children’s Miracle Network because we’ve never discussed anything about that charity and we always do that particular event for our safety patrols,” the employee wrote.
The money was raised via a series of dress-down events, in which employees and students paid $5 for the right to wear jeans or pajamas to school on particular days, including a “Miracle Jeans Day” in November and a “Pajama Day” in December.
In emails promoting the event, Myers told school staffers that the proceeds would be donated to the Children’s Miracle Network, a Utah-based non-profit that raises money for children’s hospitals and medical research.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a18 (Palm Beach [FL] Post)

 

Whooping Cough outbreak at Murray charter school
More than 30 cases at the school over the last month

MURRAY, Utah – The Salt Lake County Health Department has stepped in after 32 students at a Murray charter school were diagnosed with pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough.
At first 17 year-old Sierra Black thought it was just the common cold.
“Then I started coughing more and more and it kinda progressed from there and coughed more and more and more and more,” she said.
As a student at American International School of Utah in Murray she was aware of students showing symptoms of whooping cough. To be safe she went to the doctor and sure enough she was diagnosed with whooping cough.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0Q (KTVX)

 

Graduation 2017: High school ceremony dates, times, locations in Northern Utah

Over the next few weeks, thousands of members of the class of 2017 will be graduating from Northern Utah high schools.
Here’s a look at the dates, times and locations of high school graduations around the Ogden area, including those for school districts in Weber County, Davis County, Box Elder County, Morgan County and more.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0I (OSE)

 

Springville students help put books in Uganda schools

SPRINGVILLE – Picking up a book can easily be taken for granted, but half a world away in the town of Lugazi, Uganda, many children have never opened a book.
So the sixth graders in Andrew Lovell’s class at Westside Elementary in Springville have teamed up with Utah non-profit Musana to change that. Every penny earned during a week-long read-a-thon is going to help put books in the schools in Lugazi.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a1a (KSL)

 

Spanish Fork High student orchestrates mock crash to demonstrate DUI dangers

When Parker Webb was pondering what service to provide for his Eagle Scout project, he knew he wanted to do something out of the box.
“I knew I didn’t want to do something generic. Everyone plants trees, does everything like that,” Parker said. “I wanted to do something different.”
Parker, a student at Spanish Fork High School, spent the last year and a half working with the Utah Highway Patrol, Spanish Fork Police Department, AirMed and several other public safety agencies to orchestrate a mock DUI-related crash, an immensely realistic demonstration of the impacts of a DUI-related crash.
Police and safety officials pulled out all the stops Wednesday, especially since this doubled as a training for the officers and paramedics involved. Patrol vehicles surrounded the mock crash site, acting victims were carried away on gurneys with stage blood covering their faces, and an AirMed helicopter even transported one victim from the scene.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0J (PDH)

 

Bike to school day hosted

There was basically one rule during the bike to school event in Richfield May 10.
“It’s so important to be safe,” said Dr. David Graf.
Graf offered a few minutes of instruction on how to be safe while on a bike, including knowing where to ride on the road, always checking the crossways and using the proper signals near traffic.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a17 (Richfield Reaper)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Hindus urge all Utah schools to offer yoga like some Salt Lake City schools
Middle East North Africa Financial Network News editorial

Hindus have commended Salt Lake City School District (SLCSD) in Utah for offering yoga in its various schools, calling it a step in the positive direction.
Course Catalog (2017-2018) of its East High School (EHS) offers Yoga I (9-12), whose description includes: In this course students will unite the mind and body with the spirit, creating a more whole person and it includes meditation. Its list of yoga benefits includes self realization and inner peace. It also offers Yoga II (10-12), whose description includes enhancing mind/body connection.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a15

 

DeVos has a lot to learn about education and race
CNN op-ed by Sherrilyn Ifill, president and director-counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund Inc.

This week marks the 63rd anniversary of the Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark case that outlawed racial segregation in our nation’s schools, fundamentally redefining the meaning of equality in American law.
Although Brown is best remembered for sounding the death knell to Jim Crow in our country, the court’s decision should also be recognized for its powerful and equally groundbreaking articulation of the central role of public education in American democracy. Understanding how school segregation hurts all children, and how it lays the foundation for the kind of social and political fractures we see in our country today, may be the most important lesson Brown and its legacy can provide at this challenging moment in our nation.
As President Trump and his secretary of education, Betsy DeVos, prepare to launch a set of initiatives that could fundamentally weaken and undermine public education, we would do well to reacquaint ourselves with the guidance offered by Brown.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a13

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Trump’s first full education budget: Deep cuts to public school programs in pursuit of school choice
Washington Post

Funding for college work-study programs would be cut in half, public-service loan forgiveness would end and hundreds of millions of dollars that public schools could use for mental health, advanced coursework and other services would vanish under a Trump administration plan to cut $10.6 billion from federal education initiatives, according to budget documents obtained by The Washington Post.
The administration would channel part of the savings into its top priority: school choice. It seeks to spend about $400 million to expand charter schools and vouchers for private and religious schools, and another $1 billion to push public schools to adopt choice-friendly policies.
President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos have repeatedly said they want to shrink the federal role in education and give parents more opportunity to choose their children’s schools.
The documents – described by an Education Department employee as a near-final version of the budget expected to be released next week – offer the clearest picture yet of how the administration intends to accomplish that goal.
Though Trump and DeVos are proponents of local control, their proposal to use federal dollars to entice districts to adopt school-choice policies is reminiscent of the way the Obama administration offered federal money to states that agreed to adopt its preferred education policies through a program called Race to the Top.
The proposed cuts in long-standing programs – and the simultaneous new investment in alternatives to traditional public schools – are a sign of the Trump administration’s belief that federal efforts to improve education have failed. DeVos, who has previously derided government, is now leading an agency she views as an impediment to progress.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0u

Sidebar: 5 key questions http://gousoe.uen.org/a0W (WaPo)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a0v (Ed Week)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a12 (Chalkbeat)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a14 (Politico)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a1c (The Hill)

 

NASA Budget Cuts: Senators Urge Trump Not To Slash Agency’s Office Of Education
International Business Times

U.S. senators Wednesday wrote a letter to the Senate Appropriations Committee, urging members not to cut NASA’s Office of Education, which works to educate students nationwide to pursue careers in technology, science, engineering and math (STEM).
The call was led by Sens. Tim Kaine, D-Va., Hillary Clinton 2016 running mate, and Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., who co-chair the Senate Career and Technical Education (CTE) Caucus, along with 32 other senators. The politicians urged the Senate Appropriations Committee to support the space agency’s Office of Education in the coming fiscal year.
President Donald Trump’s budget proposal didn’t slash NASA’s budget as much as it did the Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Energy. Nonetheless, the president’s blueprint calls for the elimination of NASA’s Office of Education and some Earth science missions, and also reduces funding for Earth science research grants.
The White House said the reason why it was cutting the Office of Education was because it “has experienced significant challenges in implementing a NASA-wide education strategy and is performing functions that are duplicative of other parts of the agency.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0w

 

70,000 Students With Disabilities Secluded, Restrained in School
But Rates Can Vary Widely From District to District
Education Week

One out of every 100 special education students was restrained by school personnel or secluded in school from his or her peers in the 2013-14 school year, presumably to quell behavior that teachers considered disruptive or dangerous.
That means nearly 70,000 special education students were restrained or secluded in that school year, the most recent for which data are available. For most students, this happened more than once: States reported more than 200,000 such incidents, so on average, a special education student was restrained or secluded about three times.
These statistics, based on an analysis by the Education Week Research Center of data collected by the U.S. Department of Education’s office for civil rights, represent the best national snapshot of these controversial practices.
The numbers are also, almost surely, dramatically understated.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0Z

 

Bureau of Indian Education Dressed Down in Senate Hearing
The 74

Every two years, the Government Accountability Office, the federal watchdog, releases a new “high-risk” list of federal programs that are vulnerable to “fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement, or are most in need of transformation.”
This year, that list includes the federal government’s management of Indian education, primarily its mismanagement of spending and facilities. The Bureau of Indian Education runs 183 schools that educate some 48,000 students on reservations in multiple states.
The agency doesn’t have appropriate policies for overseeing school spending, and officials charged with that task often don’t have the requisite training. In one case, the bank account of a BIE school in Arizona was hacked, with $1 million in federal funds transferred to offshore accounts, said Melissa Emrey-Arras of the GAO.
Many school buildings are outdated and unsafe, including one school with seven boilers that failed safety inspections, including for carbon monoxide and natural gas leaks, she said.
The GAO report lists 11 open recommendations to improve facilities, spending, and the agency’s workforce and bureaucracy, some of which were made as many as three years ago. The “high-risk” report, which was discussed Wednesday before the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, also includes Indian health programs and management of energy resources on tribal lands.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0x

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0y (GAO)

 

School Infrastructure Spending Plan Introduced by House Democrats
Education Week

Legislation that would direct more than $100 billion into building and upgrading school infrastructure around the country was introduced Wednesday by Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., the House education committee’s top Democrat.
The Rebuild America’s Schools Act of 2017 would be tailored for schools in high-poverty areas, and would direct money to high-speed broadband internet as well as school construction. In a summary of the legislation, Scott and other Democratic lawmakers also said the bill would create 1.9 million jobs-that latter figure is via an estimate from the Economic Policy Institute, a think tank that leans left on economic and labor issues.
“We know that poor school facility conditions impact teaching and learning and disproportionately plague schools that serve low-income and minority students,” Scott said in a statement about the bill. “On the anniversary of [the Brown v. Board of Education school desegregation decision from the Supreme Court], we must recommit to fulfilling its decades’ old promise-that all students have access to equal educational opportunity, including equal access to safe and modern learning facilities.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0z

A copy of the bill
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0A (Congress)

 

National law firm says Parkland violating law in rejecting pro-life student club
Allentown (PA) Morning Call

SOUTH WHITEHALL TOWNSHIP – A national law firm that specializes in religious liberty cases is challenging Parkland High School over what it says is an unlawful denial of a request by two students to form a pro-life student club.
The Thomas More Society, a Chicago law firm that takes on religious liberty and anti-abortion causes free of charge, sent a demand letter Wednesday to Parkland Superintendent Richard Sniscak and others, requesting the high school reverse its rejection of the Trojans for Life club.
The letter was sent on behalf of club co-founders – senior Elizabeth Castro and junior Grace Schairer – and Students for Life of America, a national anti-abortion youth group dedicated to training students and raising awareness on school campuses. The denial by the school inspired Castro to turn to the Virginia group.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a11

 

Do Fidget Spinners Belong in the Classroom? Teachers Are Divided
Education Week

Fidgets spinners are supposed to help students sit still and focus. But many teachers are saying it’s having the exact opposite effect.
Meant to help children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, anxiety, or other conditions relieve tension and focus better, fidget spinners have become a popular toy among children. But some teachers say they have been causing classroom disruptions, prompting bans and confiscations.
For teachers who haven’t seen the recent spinner craze hit their classrooms yet, fidget spinners are small handheld toys that Forbes is calling a “cure for nervous or bored energy.” The small toy spins in your hand as you twirl the blades.
“A fidget is some type of little toy or little gadget to manipulate in their hand. It calms their sensory system,” Tara Yates, an occupational therapist at Advocate Children’s Hospital told the Chicago Tribune.
But some teachers report that students are comparing their spinners with their friends in class, throwing them around the room, and that students who don’t have ADHD or a condition that can make focusing difficult are using them too often during classroom instruction.
Fidgets spinners are the latest version of fidget toys, which have long been used by some behavior specialists to allow students to release stress or anxiety. Those tools include cubes, putties, stress balls, and other little gadgets.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a10

 

‘Choking game’ resulted in Bernards student’s death
(Woodbridge, NJ) Home News Tribune

BERNARDS – The superintendent of schools has told parents that a student’s death was the result of the “choking game.”
In the letter sent earlier this week, Superintendent of Schools Nick Markarian wrote that “one of the tragic losses of student life we have experienced this year” was the result of the game, which is also known as “space monkey,” “fainting game” and “flatliner.”
In the choking game, people strangle themselves to achieve euphoria through brief hypoxia, a lack of oxygen to the brain.
The school district did not the identify the student who died because of the choking game.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0Y

 

Arlington High graduation fight: Brawl erupts among adults during ceremonies
Memphis Commercial Appeal

A brawl between adults attending Arlington High School’s graduation was captured on video and the fight is making the rounds on social media.
As Arlington High graduates marched into the Bellevue Baptist Church sanctuary Tuesday night to cheers and high-fives, several adults in the audience were fighting a few rows away in a fist-throwing, hair-pulling, water-pouring, shoving fracas. No students were involved.
Initial reports indicate the whole wild affair may have resulted from an age-old problem for big events – saving seats.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a0X

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

May 18:

Federal Funds Commission meeting
3 p.m., 210 Senate Building
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002388.htm

June 1:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 2:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 8:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

June 20:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

June 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

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