Education News Roundup: May 23, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Voices for Utah Children report looks at inequities in school discipline.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3i (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a3N (KUTV)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a3O (KTVX)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a3P (KSTU)
or a copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3j (Voices for Utah Children)

Utah and Mexico update a child custody agreement.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a42 (DN)

U’s College of Education earns high marks in new report.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3z (DN)
or a copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/a45 (NCTQ)

Sen. Ipson offers a thank you for teachers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3M (SGS)

Book Cliff Elementary Principal Jones offers a thank you for the community.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a44 (Emery County Progress)

Secretary DeVos offers a preview of the federal education budget due out today.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3h (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a3m (WaPo)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a3n (Indianapolis Star)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a3o (National Review)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a3p (Politico)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a3t (AP)
or a copy of the speech
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3R (ED)

AP wonders what will become of the quiet agreements schools have worked out with the parents of transgendered students over restroom use if the new Texas bathroom bill passes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3U (AP)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Report: School discipline down in Utah, but racial disparities worsen
Education » School suspensions, expulsions, in-school police contacts all decline, but disproportionately target minority students.

Utah, Mexico update agreement about duties in child custody cases

U. College of Education among top secondary teacher preparation programs nationwide

Graduation day is a milestone for the students and a polygamous town

Capstone Classical Academy to sit on 14 acres in Pleasant View

Westlake High senior overcomes health problems, bullying to graduate

West Side grad works to expand series after publishing novel

Ten Utah educators receive Excellence in Teaching awards

Ogden High School students win grant money for charity and new iPads

Heritage Elementary kids learn about financial planning in hands-on activity

Orem grade schoolers’ study finds most drivers make illegal left-hand turns

Bonneville High School Graduation 2017

2017 high school graduations in Utah County

Check out the program that is getting more dads to volunteer at schools

Arby’s to provide meal cards to Granite students

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Helping students with tax increase won’t hurt economy

It’s a good time to say ‘thanks’ to teachers

Appreciation from Book Cliff Elem.

Trump’s Education Budget Takes Aim at the Working Class
The president wants to cut funding for programs such as career and technical education and redirect that money toward school choice.

Improving education by focusing on teacher health and well-being

NATION

DeVos: It Would Be a ‘Terrible Mistake’ for States Not to Expand School Choice

Why schools are worried about Medicaid cuts hurting special education

Fast. Isolating. Superficial.
What class is like for the millions of high-schoolers now taking courses online.

Study Finds Digital Exam Features Impact Scores for Younger Students

Reinventing high school
Textbooks are rare. So are traditional grades. Students progress at their own pace. See how one New Hampshire school is retooling education.

States Look to Military Veterans to Fill Teaching Positions

How Differences in Parents’ Income Play Out in Schools

Report: Poor roads on tribal lands lead to school absences

Black parents use Civil War-era law to challenge Mississippi’s ‘inequitable’ system of public schools

Texas Bathroom Bill Could Expose Secrets of Transgender Kids

St. Paul’s School Acknowledges Decades of Sexual Misconduct

The Science of Adolescent Sleep

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Report: School discipline down in Utah, but racial disparities worsen
Education » School suspensions, expulsions, in-school police contacts all decline, but disproportionately target minority students.

Between 2012 and 2014, Utah public schools issued 8,635 fewer disciplinary actions against students, according to a report released Monday by Voices for Utah Children and the University of Utah’s S.J. Quinney College of Law.
The downward trend meant roughly 30 percent fewer suspensions, expulsions, law enforcement referrals and in-school arrests compared to the 2011-2012 school year.
“It’s nothing short of a good thing that the total number of actions is down,” said researcher Vanessa Walsh, an S.J. Quinney College graduate. “It shows that Utah has done a lot of work in the last 18 months, 24 months, to address the issue.”
But while the total number of disciplinary actions dropped, racial and ethnic disparities in how those actions were meted out to Utah’s public school students worsened.
More than 10 percent of American Indian students were disciplined during the 2013-2014 school year, compared with 5.6 percent of other children of color and 2.6 percent of white students.
Fewer than 0.5 percent of white students were referred to law enforcement agencies by schools in 2014, compared with 1.5 percent of American Indian students and 1.2 percent of black students.
Hispanic students were more than twice as likely than their white peers to be expelled in 2014, according to the report, despite comparable expulsion rates for the two demographic groups in 2012.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3i (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a3N (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a3O (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a3P (KSTU)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3j (Voices for Utah Children)

 

Utah, Mexico update agreement about duties in child custody cases

SALT LAKE CITY — The consulate of Mexico in Salt Lake City signed an agreement Monday with the Utah Department of Human Services, updating the consulate’s extensive role in assisting parental custody cases for minors with Mexican citizenship.
Javier Chagoya, the consul of Mexico in Salt Lake, was joined for a signing ceremony by Ann Williamson, executive director of the Department of Human Services, and Tonya Myrup, acting director of the Division of Child and Family Services. Their signatures were met with applause by custody case workers and others in attendance.
Williamson lauded the agreement as an important step “to advance our shared commitment to children and families thriving safely in their homes, schools and communities.” She said the consulate of Mexico fills an integral role in assuring that Mexican children involved in custody cases in Utah are provided with as many potential positive solutions as would be arranged for any other child in the state.
“Every child and family in Utah who comes to the attention of the Division of Child and Family Services will be helped in the same protection and dignity as any other,” Williamson told those gathered for the signing. “A child does not consider the accountability of citizenship status when they want to be safe and loved — and neither do we.”
The new memorandum of understanding between the organizations replaces the one they signed in 2011. The new document specifically makes a provision for the consulate to assist the Division of Child and Family Services in securing documentation from Mexico required in a minor’s application for Special Immigrant Juvenile Status in the United States.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a42 (DN)

 

U. College of Education among top secondary teacher preparation programs nationwide

SALT LAKE CITY — The University of Utah’s College of Education is considered one of the top secondary teacher preparation programs in the country, according to the latest ratings by the National Council on Teacher Quality.
The U.’s secondary education program received top-tier recognition for its admission standards, teaching candidates’ content area preparation, and the art and science of teaching.
“Our mantra has always been student ready day one. The nature of the job doesn’t really allow for on-the-job training, particularly with children with disabilities and children who are language learners. Certainly all children need people who are ready day one,” said Mary D. Burbank, director of the university’s Urban Institute for Teacher Education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3z (DN)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/a45 (NCTQ)

 

Graduation day is a milestone for the students and a polygamous town

Hildale • The graduates wore gowns, and they wrote and drew on the tops of their mortarboard caps just like teenagers anywhere.
“Pomp and Circumstance” played over the loudspeakers as the graduates marched into the gymnasium, just like at a high school anywhere.
Yet the commencement ceremony Monday at Water Canyon High School was a little different than most others. There was more emphasis on the students’ accomplishments than the average high school graduation.
That’s because the average graduate at Water Canyon has been through a lot. Many of the students are former members of the polygamous Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3y (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a3L (SGS)

 

Capstone Classical Academy to sit on 14 acres in Pleasant View

PLEASANT VIEW — About 14 acres of land to the west of U.S. Highway 89 in Pleasant View has been secured for Capstone Classical Academy.
The school’s charter was approved by the Utah State Board of Education in February. Construction is slated to begin in late fall 2017 and be finished by August 2018 for the school to open, serving grades 6-12.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3E (OSE)

 

Westlake High senior overcomes health problems, bullying to graduate

Nikayla Sampson spent a large chunk of her high school years looking pale, with her knees to her chest and a heating pad on her stomach.
“It was a sharp, excruciating pain,” the 18-year-old said. “There were times it would be so bad I couldn’t stand up straight or couldn’t get out of bed.”
The Westlake High School senior spent time out of school, actually a lot of it, as doctors put her through test after test to try to discover what was wrong. They initially thought the stomach pain could be caused by Sampson’s anxiety and depression. Then, they thought her food allergies were the cause. But none of those were a full explanation.
Finally, in January, they had their answer. Sampson had gallstones, loads of them, in addition to an ovarian cyst. She wasn’t allowed to lift anything over 15 pounds and couldn’t twist her body too much while her cyst shrank and her gallbladder was removed.
Not surprisingly, her grades suffered because of it.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3H (PDH)

West Side grad works to expand series after publishing novel

High school is a time of milestones. Your first time driving a car. Your first deep friendships and relationships.
Jordan B. Jolley wrote his first novel. Jolley, who graduates from West Side High School on Wednesday, completed and published a fantasy adventure novel when he was a junior.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3K (LHJ)

 

Ten Utah educators receive Excellence in Teaching awards

SALT LAKE CITY — Ten Utah educators have been recognized for their positive impacts on students’ lives. They were honored with an award, a poster to display at their school and $1,500.
The Excellence in Teaching award recipients are:
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3B (DN)

 

Ogden High School students win grant money for charity and new iPads

OGDEN — Ogden High School was one of five schools in the United States to win the Lead2Feed Challenge, winning $20,000 for the charity of its choice and a $10,000 technology package.
Ogden High students, most of whom were involved with the school’s Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, completed several projects throughout the year that empowered their peers to make healthy lifestyle choices.
Ogden High teacher Shaylene Parry oversees the school’s FCCLA program. She said the students made Pantry Packs for elementary school children, held weekly cooking classes, gathered almost 3,200 pounds of food at a Christmastime food drive and learned how to garden, among other things.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3F (OSE)

 

Heritage Elementary kids learn about financial planning in hands-on activity

Buy a video game full price now or wait until it comes out at another store to use a coupon? Buy the latest cereal that costs extra or keep eating the one you have? Buy a new water bottle every day for summer camp or refill the reusable one?
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3J (LHJ)

 

Orem grade schoolers’ study finds most drivers make illegal left-hand turns

OREM — More than half of drivers make illegal left-hand turns, according to a new study cited by Orem police.
The study found 57 percent of 256 drivers observed at the intersection of 800 North and 800 West on Jan. 14 and Jan. 28 failed to stick to their designated lane, veering wide into lanes where they weren’t supposed to go under Utah law.
While Orem Police Lt. Craig Martinez found the numbers to be revealing, the authors of the study proved to be even more surprising.
Madi Yablonovsky, 9, and Aubrey Yablonovsky, 11, are grade schoolers who attend Bonneville Elementary School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3A (KSL via DN)

 

Bonneville High School Graduation 2017

Bonneville High School class of 2017 graduates on Monday, May 22, 2017, at the Dee Events Center in Ogden.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3D (OSE)

 

2017 high school graduations in Utah County

http://gousoe.uen.org/a3I (PDH)

 

Check out the program that is getting more dads to volunteer at schools

The Watchdog Dad program is a national program that was implemented locally by the Canyons School District. We took a trip to Oakdale Elementary School to see how it was going.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3Q (KSTU)

 

Arby’s to provide meal cards to Granite students

SALT LAKE CITY — On May 25, the Arby’s Foundation will provide 43,200 meal cards to students who rely on free or reduced lunch in South Salt Lake’s Granite School District.
One in five Utah children have “limited access to adequate food,” which the program, known as “School’s Out, Food’s in,” is aiming to change, according to a news release provided by the Arby’s Foundation.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3C (DN)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Helping students with tax increase won’t hurt economy
UtahPolicy op-ed by Doug Macdonald, chair of the Davis Alliance for Public Education and is a former chief economist, Utah State Tax Commission

Recent arguments against raising income taxes to fund public education either indicate a misunderstanding of the measures or are an attempt to deflect the power of the proposal to help our children and grandchildren flourish in future years.
The first argument used is that the economy is growing fast enough that school budgets don’t need to continue at the same percentage of the economy. This rationale reflects a misunderstanding of the statistic. The chart below highlights the basic statistic of “public education effort”, that the amount of operating funds for Utah’s schools 20 years ago and today should stay equal if you are to expect similar results. Technically, it means that if the State funds K-12 public education at the same percentage of the economy that it did in the mid-1990s, then it is making the same relative “effort”.
Since the economy increased, the State has the “ability to pay” more at the same percentage it did in the past. If it pays less, the State’s effort is lower, and hence its priorities changed, in this case to fund transportation projects. The near 1% lower spending effort (from 4.0% to 3.1%), means that our children’s schools had to economize by shorting teacher salaries, increasing class sizes and making other adjustments. As CEO Mark Bouchard, from the CBRE real estate firm, so often exclaimed when he ran for the state school board, “It simply is not a good business model, to pay your people less and expect the same or better results.”
The second argument we have heard against returning the state’s income tax to its prior, real dollar level is that it would “hurt the economy”. This argument assumes that higher taxes will come off the tables of the middle class and they will spend less on taxable sales items, slowing down the economy. The economic facts are very different.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a43

 

It’s a good time to say ‘thanks’ to teachers
(St. George) Spectrum op-ed by Sen. Don Ipson

The Washington County School District is wrapping up the 2016-17 school year this week, culminating in graduation ceremonies for the senior class.
This is the time of year when students and teachers alike count down the remaining days until summer break. It seems an appropriate time to reflect on the important role teachers play in the lives our children and the future success of our state. Though my own children have passed well beyond school age, several of my grandchildren are students in the Washington County School District and one granddaughter will graduate this year.
As a state legislator, I have had several occasions over the years to visit classrooms and speak with students about the legislative process. I often leave these classroom visits appreciating even more the work our teachers are doing. Bringing upbeat energy to a classroom day-in and day-out on a diverse range of topics is hard work!
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3M

 

Appreciation from Book Cliff Elem.
Emery County Progress op-ed by J.R. Jones, Principal

On behalf of Book Cliff Elementary, I would like to express heartfelt thanks for the help and support our school has received since the 2016 break-in. As school personnel arrived on the morning of Dec. 16, 2016 we found our school had become a target of vandalism and theft. Not only had the perpetrators ransacked the office, but they had also taken many items from the school including computers, iPads, personal property, and the district car our teachers use for meetings and trainings.
Not only were teachers unable to enter their own classrooms and were told to remain in the main hallway, but students were restricted from entering the building at all. School was canceled in order for the Sheriff’s Office to search, clear, and investigate the crime scene, and parents were notified to take their student(s) home.
This senseless crime came just after our school had been identified by the Utah State Board of Education as a “Turnaround School,” which we were in the process of making great strides to correct. Not only did this crime have an effect on our faculty and staff, but students were afraid to return to school.
With the help and support of many, our students have overcome these hurdles and have not only demonstrated great pride for their school, but they are also on the verge of improving scores that will help Book Cliff escape our Turnaround status.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a44

 

Trump’s Education Budget Takes Aim at the Working Class
The president wants to cut funding for programs such as career and technical education and redirect that money toward school choice.
Atlantic commentary by columnist ALIA WONG

Many of the spending goals outlined in Donald Trump’s proposed education budget reflect his campaign rhetoric. The president, who has long called for reducing the federal government’s role in schools and universities, wants to cut the Education Department’s funding by $9.2 billion, or 13.6 percent of the budget approved by Congress last month. The few areas that would see a boost pertain to school choice, an idea that Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos have repeatedly touted as a top priority. In the White House’s spending proposal, hundreds of millions of the dollars would go toward charter-school and voucher initiatives, while another $1 billion in grants would encourage states to adopt school-choice policies.
But other aspects of Trump’s funding plan fly in the face of his past statements on education, raising confusion about his priorities. He wants to cut state grants for career and technical education (CTE), for example, by $168 million, and nearly halve funding for the roughly-$1 billion federal work-study program, according to The Washington Post and other outlets. Both CTE and work-study are education models that enjoy broad bipartisan support and are particularly palatable to Republicans and the white, working-class voters who clinched Trump’s election. Tellingly, there’s little consensus between Trump’s spending proposal and the bipartisan appropriations bill unveiled by Congress earlier this month.
Trump’s education budget, which will be published Tuesday as part of full spending plan’s release, would reduce or eliminate nearly two dozen programs. A spokesman on Friday said the department wouldn’t comment on the budget until it was released by the Office of Management and Budget. The final version reiterates many of the funding priorities outlined in the “skinny”—i.e., preliminary—budget released in March, which had already made it clear that Trump wanted to get rid of the relatively small education programs that, in the eyes of the administration, lack the evidence and reach needed to prove they’re worthy of investment. The congressional deal struck at the beginning of this month to keep the government running into September, on the other hand, maintains level funding for many of the education programs Trump wants to do away with or trim down.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3X

 

Improving education by focusing on teacher health and well-being
(Washington, DC) The Hill op-ed by REP. TIM RYAN (D-OHIO)

We pay football coaches millions and praise them for building successful programs because the best coaches can take any group and turn them into champions. Teachers are the coaches of the classroom and they too can turn ordinary groups into extraordinary high achievers.
Unfortunately, we do not support teachers the way we support coaches. We are expecting more and more out of teachers without providing them additional tools to keep up with the demands. This has resulted in significant increases in teacher stress, tying them for the highest rate of daily stress among occupations.
These levels of stress are not just bad news for educators, but also for our students who depend on them every day and for our economy which is losing $7 billion a year due to high rates of teacher turnover and retraining.
Luckily, there are programs available that focus on workplace wellness, social emotional learning, and teacher stress management to help our nation’s educators perform at their best.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a40

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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DeVos: It Would Be a ‘Terrible Mistake’ for States Not to Expand School Choice
Education Week

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos used a speech at the American Federation for Children’s national summit in Indianapolis on Monday to rally states behind the cause of expanding school choice—even though the Trump administration won’t force them to do so.
In the speech before the school choice advocacy group that DeVos used to lead, the education secretary said President Donald Trump soon will propose “the most ambitious expansion of education choice in our nation’s history.”
She didn’t provide any details on how those choice programs would work as the Trump administration prepares to release its fiscal 2018 budget. But DeVos did say that while Washington won’t force states into expanding choice programs and will leave states a lot of flexibility, those states that decline to do so will be held accountable by their constituents.
“If a state doesn’t want to participate, that would be a terrible mistake on their part,” DeVos said. “They will be hurting the children and families who can least afford it. If politicians in a state block education choice, it means those politicians do not support equal opportunity for all kids.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3h

http://gousoe.uen.org/a3m (WaPo)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a3n (Indianapolis Star)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a3o (National Review)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a3p (Politico)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a3t (AP)

A copy of the speech
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3R (ED)

 

Why schools are worried about Medicaid cuts hurting special education
NewsHour

Special education, which is hugely reliant on Medicaid, is one factor that didn’t get much attention in the debate over the Republican health care bill. If the bill becomes law and triggers billions of dollars of cuts to Medicaid, how would it affect the millions of public school kids who receive special ed services?
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3Z

 

Fast. Isolating. Superficial.
What class is like for the millions of high-schoolers now taking courses online.
Slate

After she failed English her junior year at Riverbend High School in Spotsylvania, Virginia, 17-year-old Amelia Kreck had to retake the class. It took her two days.
In the classroom, Amelia had struggled with essay writing. But the online course her school directed her to take as a replacement had no essays. Nor did Amelia have to read any books in their entirety. Unsurprisingly, she says, she never had to think very hard. That’s because she skipped out of most units through a series of “pretests” at the start, which she says contained basic grammar questions as well as some short readings followed by multiple-choice sections.
Amelia says she enjoyed some of the readings in the online version of the class, created by for-profit education company Edgenuity, including excerpts from Freakonomics and the writings of the theoretical physicist Michio Kaku. She also appreciated the flexibility to work from home—until after midnight on one of the two days it took here to recover her credit. But “there was a big component of the original class that was missing from credit recovery,” she says. “Most of it was on the shallow side.” She finished so quickly, she says, that “I didn’t improve in the areas that needed improvement.”
Across the country over the past decade, millions of students like Amelia have been retaking classes online as their school districts have tried to boost high school graduation rates and keep struggling students on track. Some researchers and teachers argue the trend fundamentally undermines the integrity of a high school diploma while supporters, including scores of school administrators and politicians, counter that online learning better equips students for an increasingly virtual world and gives more students the opportunity to graduate. Yet apart from a few limited, highly abstract research studies, virtually nothing is known about the student experience in these controversial classes, which have been proliferating rapidly. Since the fall, the Teacher Project has interviewed dozens of students, almost all of whom echoed Amelia’s points: They enjoy learning on their own schedules and find the online classes to be fun and flexible in a way that traditional classes often are not. But the students also find the experience to be isolating, the content shockingly superficial, and the online curricula incredibly easy to game through quick Google searches—or even, in several cases, by paying friends to do all the work.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3g

 

Study Finds Digital Exam Features Impact Scores for Younger Students
THE Journal

Can student scores on paper-and-pencil tests and computer-based tests be considered equivalent measures of knowledge?
To find out, a recent study by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) looked at scores from 33,000 students in grades 4-12 who took two computer-based tests (CBT) and one traditional paper-and-pencil test (PPT). Researchers concluded that features of a specific computer testing system matter and can impact a younger student’s overall performance.
One CBT format was administered on an open-source online testing system called TAO, while the other was made available via the AAAS assessment website. Overall, elementary and middle school students scored lower on the CBT formats. However, they performed worse on the AAAS system — citing the fact that these digital exams didn’t allow students to revisit previous questions as a possible reason. Meanwhile, high school students performed similarly on all test formats.
“This may indicate that being able to skip, review and change previous responses could be beneficial for younger students in elementary and middle school, but have no influence on older students in high school and college,” according to the study.
In addition, non-native English speakers in the study performed better on written exams compared to digital exams, but scored significantly lower than their classmates on both formats. Notably, the differences in scores for these students compared to their classmates whose primary language is English were greater for both of the two CBT formats.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3q

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3r (American Educational Research Association)

 

Reinventing high school
Textbooks are rare. So are traditional grades. Students progress at their own pace. See how one New Hampshire school is retooling education.
Christian Science Monitor

MANCHESTER, N.H.—Two-dozen high school students are gathered around a large work table as manufacturing teacher Dan Cassidy holds out boxes of metal bars and gears. The students choose among the parts to build model bicycles. “What else are we going to use today? Let me hear some vocab here,” he says. When a student shouts out “chains,” he nudges them until they recall another term for it: “linkage.”
This isn’t a manufacturing class. It’s actually a combined geometry and physical science class. While clusters of students work at stations assembling miniature two-wheelers, others rotate through a lesson on the computer and reason through a problem about parallel triangles the old-fashioned way – with paper and pencil. Mr. Cassidy and co-teacher Athanasia Robinson, whose specialty is math, circulate and check on everyone’s progress.
“I have a really hard time just sitting in a class and focusing on a teacher and writing notes,” says sophomore Hope Nichols as she and a purple-haired classmate bolt together a bike. “But here, everything is hands-on … or I can kind of teach myself, which I really prefer.”
Students rarely see textbooks here at the Manchester School of Technology High School (MST-HS), a low-slung utilitarian building a few miles from the river where high-tech businesses occupy former textile mills. In most classes, they don’t get standard letter grades. They don’t automatically move on to the next level at the end of the school year, but instead advance once they have mastered the material. Students buttress their classroom learning with real-world experiences – such as building a house or working as a chef – to help prepare for future careers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a41

 

States Look to Military Veterans to Fill Teaching Positions
Education Week

Efforts to combat teacher turnover rates in high-poverty and high-needs schools could tap into a growing pool of military veterans entering the classroom. But veterans who are interested in becoming teachers need more encouragement, and states with large military and veteran populations are offering increased support through programs like Troops to Teachers.
Shane Larkin, a high school history and world studies teacher at Early College Academy of Columbus in Ohio, was named Muscogee County schools’ 2017 Teacher of the Year earlier this month. But before becoming a teacher, Larkin served in the U.S. Army for 10 years.
His service during a peacekeeping mission in Bosnia offered him a new perspective and outlook on education. Larkin’s first teaching position was during his deployment to Kosovo, where he taught English to Serbian students.
“I loved almost everything about being an infantry squad leader,” he told the Ledger-Enquirer, “but I felt completely comfortable and inspired while teaching those students for several hours a week.”
“It was truly rewarding for me to be part of making a safe zone for those kids who were not safe to even go into neighboring towns,” he added. “It was at that point I realized the true meaning and power of education.”
For veterans like Larkin, there are several programs in colleges and through the government that seek to encourage veterans to enter the field and ease the transition from military life to the classroom.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3s

 

How Differences in Parents’ Income Play Out in Schools
Education Week

Does a parents’ income affect the way they get involved with their child’s school?
Parents who earn $75,000 a year are more likely than parents at the low end of the income scale to volunteer in school, attend school meetings, or move so that their children can attend a better school, according to data gathered by the Education Week Research Center.
In this video, Education Week’s Sarah D. Sparks describes how differences in parent involvement can contribute to hidden disparities that are easy for schools to overlook but hard for poor families to overcome.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3W (video)

 

Report: Poor roads on tribal lands lead to school absences
Associated Press

PHOENIX— The federal government released a report Monday that casts a critical light on the poor conditions of roads on tribal lands nationwide, highlighting the widespread challenge of getting Native American children to school during bad weather.
The General Accounting Office sent a team to visit 10 different school districts on three reservations in Arizona and South Dakota, where they spent time interviewing school officials and evaluating bus routes by riding with students to school.
They experienced unmaintained roads, bumpy rides, loud rattling windows and lengthy routes. The government team rode buses in May and June when weather conditions were fairly good compared with the winter months.
“We went on pretty typical bus routes and some of those typical bus routes were over an hour long,” said Rebecca Shea, director of the agency team.
Earthen or gravel roads become muddy and impassible after being hit with heavy rain, snowfall or strong winds, causing students to be late for school when buses get stuck. Bus routes are sometimes 100 miles one way and require drivers to go 5 mph to navigate large rocks and ruts and steep inclines with no guard rails.
“Our mud can be up a foot deep, which causes our buses to get stuck, buses to slide. It can pose a safety issue for our students and our drivers,” Superintendent Lynnette Michalski of Window Rock Unified School District said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3u

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3v (GAO)

 

Black parents use Civil War-era law to challenge Mississippi’s ‘inequitable’ system of public schools
Washington Post

The Southern Poverty Law Center is using a novel legal argument in an attempt to remove what it describes as gross inequities between public schools serving majority-white and majority-black populations in Mississippi.
In a lawsuit filed in federal court Tuesday, the organization alleges that poor academic outcomes for black students in Mississippi are a direct result of the state’s failure to live up to the terms of its readmission to the Union following the Civil War.
The complaint hinges on a 147-year-old law that Congress passed to allow Mississippi to rejoin the Union shortly after the state ratified a new constitution that required, as a prerequisite for an educated public and a functioning democracy, a “uniform system of free public schools” for all citizens, black and white.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3S

http://gousoe.uen.org/a3Y (Jackson [MS] Clarion-Ledger)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a3T (AP)

 

Texas Bathroom Bill Could Expose Secrets of Transgender Kids
Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas — Each morning, Joanna Smith’s 7-year-old son pulls on a T-shirt and shorts, boasts how fast he can tie his sneakers and heads to school. An honor-roll student who loves science and spelling, he often stays after class to run on the playground with his large group of friends.
But teachers may soon have to disrupt his routine by revealing a secret: This energetic boy was born a girl. Legislation headed for passage in the Texas Legislature this month could forbid him from using the boys’ bathroom and effectively divulge his transgender identity to classmates.
“He would be very embarrassed and ashamed to be outed,” said Smith, who plans to pull her child out of school if the measure is adopted. “I worry so much that it would just ruin his life.” She spoke on the condition that her son’s name would not be used.
The measure poses an excruciating dilemma for Texas schools that have quietly agreed at parents’ requests to keep secret the birth genders of some students.
To comply with state law, teachers might have to send transgender students to the bathroom of their birth gender or to a single-occupancy bathroom, shocking their peers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3U

 

St. Paul’s School Acknowledges Decades of Sexual Misconduct
New York Times

There was an English teacher, the investigators said, who groped a student and had a sexual relationship with another. A female student said a music teacher sexually touched her in his car. And there was a sacred studies teacher, a minister, whom one student accused of rape.
On Monday, St. Paul’s School, an elite prep school in New Hampshire, named 13 former faculty and staff members who investigators said were involved in substantiated reports of sexual misconduct from 1948 to 1988. Ten more employees, accused of lesser offenses, were not named.
The report laid out publicly, in painful detail, what an earlier investigation by the school on the same subject had not. In 2000, spurred by alumni who had gathered for their 25th reunion and decided to tell the school of alleged sexual abuse, the head of the school at the time vowed an investigation. “The chips,” he said then, “will have to fall where they may.”
But that effort ended quietly, having delved into claims against only three teachers, with few answers for alumni and no full report issued to the public. Among those named in the 2017 report are some of the teachers the alumni had raised
concerns about in 2000.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3l

http://gousoe.uen.org/a3V (Reuters)

 

The Science of Adolescent Sleep
New York Times

Why do children wake up early when they are young but want to stay in bed till noon as teenagers?
Experts say it’s biology. Adolescents’ bodies want to stay up late and sleep late, putting them out of sync with what their school schedules demand of them. So kids have trouble waking up, and they often find themselves feeling drowsy in morning algebra class.
But that chronic sleepiness can affect their health and well­being, their behavior, and even their safety; it becomes genuinely dangerous when sleepy teenagers get behind the wheel.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a3w

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

May 25:

Charter School Revolving Loan Committee meeting
9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
https://www.utah.gov/pmn/sitemap/notice/397351.html

June 1:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 2:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 8:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
TBD
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

June 20:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

June 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

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