Education News Roundup: June 1, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Our Schools Now are backing increases to both income and sales tax to fund schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8g (UP)

Park City School District increases beginning teacher pay to $50 K.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8h (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a8i (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a8j (PR)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/a8A (KSTU)

Politico looks at the future of the 7th Circuit Court ruling on the transgender bathroom issue.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8t (Politico)

ED introduces a new IDEA website.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8C (ED)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Backers of initiative to increase school funding will seek both income and sales tax boost

Park City School District offers new teachers $50K starting pay, state’s highest
School district also offers $50K starting pay, Utah’s highest; median home price of about $750K makes filling jobs especially difficult.

Increasing Salaries So Teachers Don’t Have To Become Principals

10th Circuit: BLM must revisit OHV routes on 6 million acres in Utah

Students get new level of learning with hands-on program

The PRIDE Issue
Be bold. Be brave. Be proud. Be you.

Eight Utah places and programs honored for living in the future

Quarterfinalists for the 2018 Music Educator Award announced

Timpanogos High School grad cares for siblings while becoming first-generation college student

Multitalented Ridgeline senior graduates with hopes of teaching

Utah Virtual Academy to Celebrate Class of 2017
Statewide Online Public Charter School to Hold In-Person Graduation on June 2

Celebrate the positive

NSHS journalists receive multiple awards

Former student thanks 3rd-grade teacher 40 years later

Twin Peaks students relate subjects through art

PCSD accepts school board applications

How you can help preserve pieces of the old Granite High School

Old Spring City School now officially restored

OPINION & COMMENTARY

7th-grader is going viral for her poem on peer pressure, says ‘you are good enough’

Surviving May and the end-of-the-school-year gauntlet

It’s time to hold DeVos accountable

NATION

Trump Budget Draws Ire, Tepid Support From School Choice World

Will 7th Circuit ruling resonate in other courts?

In Race for Test-Takers, ACT Outscores SAT?for Now
But both organizations are making a strong play for statewide test markets

Teachers Unions Prepare for Thousands of Lost Members as New Case Moves Toward the Supreme Court

Kansas Senate agrees to school finance formula, but warnings from Democrats continue

Elementary and middle school math set to change

Recent immigrants to the U.S. are better educated: report

U.S. Department of Education Launches New Idea Website
Site features updated and expanded information, improved navigation and design

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Backers of initiative to increase school funding will seek both income and sales tax boost

The Our Schools Now citizen/business initiative petition-backers are preparing to file a petition that, if approved by voters in 2018, would increase the state sales tax by 0.5 percentage points and hike the personal state income tax rate by an additional half-a-percentage point.
The increases would together bring in around $700 million more each year for public schools; Capitol Hill sources tell UtahPolicy.com.
It may well be that few state Republican lawmakers, nor GOP Gov. Gary Herbert, will get behind the revised initiative.
But previous surveys by UPD’s pollster Dan Jones & Associates have found majority support among voters for OSN’s previous idea of a 7/8th of 1 percent increase in the state personal income tax rate ? which was opposed by Herbert and most legislative Republicans.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8g (UP)

 

Park City School District offers new teachers $50K starting pay, state’s highest
School district also offers $50K starting pay, Utah’s highest; median home price of about $750K makes filling jobs especially difficult.

Park City ? Sharon Ellsworth-Nielson said she had trouble sleeping Tuesday night, she said, because she felt “fuzzily, warmly, appreciated.”
The Park City High School debate coach and English teacher had cast a ratifying vote in favor of a new salary schedule, bringing Ellsworth-Nielson and fellow educators a $7,000 raise next year.
“It’s the vote of confidence,” she said. “That’s more important than the money.”
On Wednesday, the Park City Board of Education voted unanimously to approve the changes, which includes an entry-level pay rate of $50,700 ? up from $43,700 ? in addition to across-the-board raises.
The vote came after weeks of budgetary jockeying among Utah’s school districts, but appeared to cement Park City School District’s status as the highest-paying employer of teachers in Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8h (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a8i (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a8j (PR)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a8A (KSTU)

 

Increasing Salaries So Teachers Don’t Have To Become Principals

Spencer Campbell spends much of his days walking the halls of Elk Ridge Middle School, checking breezeways for kids playing hooky, redirecting foot traffic in between classes and checking in on substitute teachers.
Campbell is one of two assistant principals at Elk Ridge, a school just south of Salt Lake City, Utah. It’s his first year in the role and he looks the part. He’s in his late 30s, sharply dressed, walks briskly and carries a walkie-talkie on his belt.
Before coming to education, Campbell owned a small business. He says he felt drawn to schools, though, so he got a master’s degree and spent five years in the classroom as a teacher.
Where, after all that, he says he just couldn’t make ends meet. “As a teacher I was making $43,000 a year and I had a part-time job where I would work another 20,” he says. “That wasn’t for the extras. That was just for the basics.” Extras like braces for his kids, piano lessons and the occasional vacation.
So, he looked ahead to the next step: administration.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8B (KUER via NPR)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a8G (KUER via UPR)

 

10th Circuit: BLM must revisit OHV routes on 6 million acres in Utah

SALT LAKE CITY ? A settlement approved by the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver resolves a protracted, contentious legal battle pitting off-highway vehicle groups, multiple rural counties and the state of Utah against environmental organizations that wanted the lines redrawn or erased on 20,000 miles of recreation trails.
With a compromise reached, the Bureau of Land Management in Utah will spend the next eight years on a do-over of 13 travel management plans covering more than 6 million acres of public lands in eastern and southern Utah.
“We think this has been a long time coming,” said Steve Bloch, legal director of the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance.
That organization, joined by Grand Canyon Trust, Utah Rivers Council, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and six other groups sued in federal court after the BLM issued resource management plans in 2008, asserting the BLM violated several environmental laws when it designated the routes.
Groups challenged the travel plans’ impacts to cultural resources and the BLM’s failure to adequately consider resulting damage, as well as the agency’s failure to conduct surveys to determine the breadth of cultural artifacts at risk from potential OHV use.
The state of Utah, the Utah Schools and Institutional Trust Lands Administration, eight rural counties, off-highway groups and multiple energy corporations intervened in the lawsuit, which involved travel management plans for the Moab, Monticello, Price, Richfield and Vernal field offices of the BLM.
“With the settlement agreement in place, we will work to make sure that BLM-Utah’s new travel management plans fully account for and protect Utah’s unique cultural resources and red rock wilderness lands,” Bloch said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8H (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a8I (DN via KSL)

 

Students get new level of learning with hands-on program

A high school program in Park City is giving some serious hands-on experience for students by connecting them to the business world.
It’s called the PCCAPS program, which stands for the Park City Center for Advanced Professional Studies.
“It’s a project-based learning experience for students,” said Danny Fisher, PCCAPS specialist.
Students in the program have helped design buildings, kids’ toys, and more.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8Q (KUTV)

 

The PRIDE Issue
Be bold. Be brave. Be proud. Be you.

The quote “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken,” is often attributed to Oscar Wilde, though some could argue it was perhaps a marketing ploy by the brilliant minds at Hobby Lobby to sell more ready-made art.
Still, the queer playwright and poet’s words carry with them a dose of self-acceptance heft. Despite many misconceptions, LGBTQ culture in Salt Lake City is thriving, and this week’s Pride festivities are a testament to that?from the 8th annual Miss City Weekly on Thursday, to Sunday’s parade through downtown, to a series of splinter festivities across town?SLC’s rainbow colors run deep.

A is for allies. Be them from inside the LGBTQ community (lesbians played a huge role helping out their gay brothers during the height of the AIDS crisis), or outside, the queer movement owes a lot to those who’ve lent their voice when they didn’t have to. Think the revolutionary flame has extinguished? Just last March, students at Mount Ogden Junior High School got approval from the Ogden Board of Education to start the district’s first gay-straight alliance club.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8P (SLCW)

 

Eight Utah places and programs honored for living in the future

Eight projects were recognized Wednesday for their power to help promote the qualities that Utahns say they want the state to have in the future.
Two were honored for community building, and two more were selected for improving the homes and cars of future communities. Two other projects earned accolades for helping rural areas keep pace with the Wasatch Front, as did a pair of efforts to educate the workforce of the 2030s and ’40s.
Gov. Gary Herbert joined the planning group Envision Utah and the Quality Growth Commission in saluting these innovative efforts to create places where Utahns can thrive and maintain features they value despite the significant population growth coming to the state.

Applauded for their efforts to prepare Utah’s workforce for jobs of the future were:
? Utah Aerospace Pathways, which helps high school students get paid internships with aerospace companies and earn manufacturing certificates beneficial to pursuing careers after high school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8R (SLT)

 

Quarterfinalists for the 2018 Music Educator Award announced

A total of 197 music teachers from 187 cities across the U.S. are quarterfinalists for the Music Educator Award presented by the Recording Academy and the Grammy Museum.
The Music Educator Award was established to “recognize current educators from kindergarten through college who have made a significant and lasting contribution to the field of music education and who demonstrate a commitment to the broader cause of maintaining music education in the schools.
The award is open to current U.S. music teachers, and anyone can nominate a teacher, including teachers themselves. Jack Gremli, with the encouragement of family and colleagues, did just that.

The semifinalists will be announced in September.
The winner will be flown to New York to attend the 60th Annual Grammy Awards and a range of Grammy Week events. The nine additional finalists will receive a $1,000 honorarium, and the schools of all 10 finalists will receive matching grants.
CBS News is happy to announce the quarterfinalists of the 2018 Music Educator Award:

Brian Thompson, Richfield High School – Richfield, Utah
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8N (CBS)

 

Timpanogos High School grad cares for siblings while becoming first-generation college student

Family always comes first to 18-year-old Vanessa Ayala. As she went through high school, turning down invitations to hang out with friends in order to watch younger siblings and even taking her brother to class and school events, it’s something she’s had to explain.
“It is just home before anything else,” said Ayala, who graduated from Timpanogos High School in Orem last week.
The daughter of Mexican immigrants, Ayala is in charge of watching her 9-year-old brother, Eduardo. She helps him get ready for school, drops him off at school and has taken him to her first period Advanced Placement Statistics class, National Honor Society activities and work. In the afternoon, she’s in charge of looking after her 6-month-old sister, Emilinia.
Her parents start working in the morning and often aren’t home until 7 or 10 p.m.
“There’s not a lot of school activities I get to go to,” she said. “When I do, I bring my brother with me.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8x (PDH)

 

Multitalented Ridgeline senior graduates with hopes of teaching

Ridgeline High School senior Joseph Henderson counts members of his family as his greatest teachers. With them, he grew up learning about everything from rocks in the great outdoors to cooking in the kitchen.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8y (LHJ)

 

Utah Virtual Academy to Celebrate Class of 2017
Statewide Online Public Charter School to Hold In-Person Graduation on June 2

MURRAY, Utah–Utah Virtual Academy (UTVA), an accredited online public charter school for students statewide, will hold an in-person graduation ceremony on Friday, June 2 at 6 p.m. at East High School in Salt Lake City.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8M (Business Wire)

 

Celebrate the positive

As the school year ended, Sevier School District received the results of a survey that was conducted several months prior.
The survey included students, parents, teachers and staff as they evaluated the district’s performance in 24 different areas.
“To me this is just as important as SAGE [student assessment of growth and excellence] testing results,” said Cade Douglas, superintendent of schools for the district. “This is the third year we’ve taken this survey.”
The University of Utah’s stakeholder survey results were overwhelmingly positive, with gains being made in several areas, according to Douglas.
The survey rated schools on a scale of one to four, with four being the best. Results included parent, student and teacher/staff input.
The district’s elementary schools scored all fours with the exceptions of school safety and teacher technology support in the student input portion of the survey, and technology use in the faculty portion. The three areas that didn’t get fours were scored at three.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8K (Richfield Reaper)

 

NSHS journalists receive multiple awards

MT. PLEASANT– As the school year has come to a close, there is one more area where North Sanpete High School (NSHS) students excelled and received numerous accolades. The Hawk’s journalism program competed in the first-ever Utah High School Future of Journalism Awards, a new program that honors the best programs across the state.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8L (Mount Pleasant Pyramid)

 

Former student thanks 3rd-grade teacher 40 years later

PROVO ? Cindy Davis had only one birthday wish this year ? to thank her beloved third-grade teacher for rescuing her at a difficult time in her life.
“She really came at a pivotal time for me,” Davis explained. “I was pretty alone and isolated. I feel like she really saved me in so many ways.”
Nearly 40 years after she sat in Margaret Foote’s classroom at Granite Elementary School in Salt Lake City, Davis got the chance.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8v (DN)

 

Twin Peaks students relate subjects through art

Kindergartner Jori Hatch likes to take out paper and draw. Her favorite thing: drawing people.
“I like to draw what I want, but I also like to do the projects our art teacher has for us,” she said.
Recently, that was tying into learning about the moon.
“I learned that on the moon there are astronaut footsteps there,” she said as she created a rocket from her name spelled vertically.
Her teacher, Cindy Jensen, said that through the Beverley Taylor Sorenson Arts Learning Program, her students have learned to combine colors and learn how to create layered pictures, such as creating backgrounds before drawings.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8J (Murray Journal)

 

PCSD accepts school board applications

People interested in becoming a member of the Park City Board of Education, replacing the resigning Phil Kaplan, can apply through June 1. According to the district’s website, pcschools.us, the position represents District 1, meaning applicants must live in the Prospector, Upper and Lower Deer Valley, Old Town or Thaynes areas. Applications can be found online and must be submitted to J.J. Ehlers, the board’s vice president, by the end of Thursday. Interviews will be conducted June 5, and the new member will be announced at a board meeting June 6. More information is available on the district website.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8k (PR)

 

How you can help preserve pieces of the old Granite High School

SALT LAKE COUNTY, Utah – A group of alumni are looking to save pieces of the historic building of the old Granite High School.
After over 100 years the school doors closed in 2009 due to a demographic shift. The campus was put up for sale and most recently it was announced Garbett Homes plans to buy the 27 acres of property.
“But this is so much more than 26 acres of property and four buildings. We are talking about the heritage of five generations of families and hundreds of thousands of people who have been touched by this place. This is about 100 years of taxpayers who have contributed to this property and feel a sense of pride and ownership in it,” a statement
The school is set to be demolished in August but they need the funds to save historic pieces by Friday, June 2nd.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8z (KTVX)

 

Old Spring City School now officially restored

SPRING CITY – On a beautiful sunny afternoon, Friday May 26, the old Spring City School was rededicated and will now be known as the Spring City Community Center. Over 300 people, including alumni, donors, volunteers and dignitaries converged on the school’s west entrance for the restoration celebration festivities. Some had traveled great distances, including New York, to be there.
A group of young children sang prelude music as the event prepared to begin, and then Mayor Jack Monnett welcomed the many visitors and guests to the event.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8O (Mount Pleasant Pyramid)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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7th-grader is going viral for her poem on peer pressure, says ‘you are good enough’
Deseret News commentary by columnist Herb Scribner

Olivia Vella, a seventh-grade student at Queen Creek Middle School, left her fellow students speechless for a wonderful poem she wrote for a class assignment.
A seventh-grade girl in Arizona is going viral for a poem she wrote for her class.
Olivia Vella, a seventh-grade student at Queen Creek Middle School in Queen Creek, Arizona, left her fellow students speechless for a wonderful poem she wrote for a class assignment, KING 5, based in Seattle, reported.
Her class was tasked with writing a slam poem about a topic they’re passionate about. This would be their last assignment for the year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8u

 

Surviving May and the end-of-the-school-year gauntlet
Deseret News commentary by columnist Tiffany Gee Lewis

May Day! May Day!
Congratulations, parents, you survived another May.
You’ve come through the gantlet that is end-of-the year recitals, orchestra concerts, band concerts and middle-school musicals.
Award ceremonies. Senior graduation parties. Preschool graduation parties. Kindergarten graduation parties. College graduation parties. More sheet cake than you thought possible.
Prom. The Mormon kind and the regular kind, which are exactly the same, but now we have two dresses to find instead of one.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8w

 

It’s time to hold DeVos accountable
CNN commentary by Sen. Elizabeth Warren

Betsy DeVos recently completed her 100th day as Secretary of Education, and the resistance to her agenda has spread across this country like wildfire.
Last week, Secretary DeVos and President Trump’s Department of Education released a budget that would upend the student aid program and make it much harder for students to afford college and repay their student loans. At the same time, the head of the federal student aid office abruptly resigned amid reports of political meddling by DeVos.
With the educational and financial futures of millions of people hanging in the balance, here’s a place to start scrutinizing Secretary DeVos.
Early in the Obama administration, Congress gave full ownership of the federal student loan portfolio to the Department of Education, removing middlemen from the program and cutting out the profits that private banks skimmed off the system. This was a brave move that required standing up to some very powerful banks and private businesses that wanted to keep on skimming.
But now, years after the transition, the Department of Education often seems to ignore the original intent of this change and instead administers the trillion-dollar loan program for the financial benefit of nearly everyone except the students it is supposed to serve.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8r

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Trump Budget Draws Ire, Tepid Support From School Choice World
Education Week

If there’s a clear winner in President Trump’s proposed budget for K-12, it’s school choice. With steep cuts slated for many cornerstone programs, the president, as expected, wants to boost investments in charters and vouchers.
But prominent players in the school choice world are hardly mooning over Trump’s plans to sink $1.4 billion into private and public school choice.
The proposed budget for fiscal 2018, which would pump more money into grants to create charter schools, establish a program to research and promote vouchers, and direct $1 billion in Title I funding for public school choice in districts, drew divergent reviews from advocates. The budget also would slash spending on teacher and principal training, after-school programs, and career and technical education.
Some of the harshest criticism came from charter supporters.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8n

 

Will 7th Circuit ruling resonate in other courts?
Politico

LGBT advocates nationwide are celebrating what they see as a victory over the Trump administration after a federal appeals court on Tuesday found conclusively ? for the first time ? that transgender students should be treated according to their gender identity at school under Title IX and the Constitution. Transgender Law Center Executive Director Kris Hayashi said: “This is a moment of hope amidst a period when the transgender community has been under attack by the new administration … The Trump administration has made so clear that it doesn’t value trans students and it won’t protect them.”
– The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit ruled unanimously in favor of Ash Whitaker, a transgender high school senior suing for the right to use the boy’s bathroom at his Wisconsin high school. The court upheld an injunction preserving that right. In its opinion, the three-judge panel wrote: “A policy that requires an individual to use a bathroom that does not conform with his or her gender identity punishes that individual for his or her gender non‐conformance, which in turn violates Title IX. The school district’s policy also subjects Ash, as a transgender student, to different rules, sanctions, and treatment than non‐transgender students, in violation of Title IX.”
– The 4th and 6th Circuit courts have also heard high-profile cases dealing with transgender student rights and access to facilities like bathrooms. In the case of Virginia high school senior Gavin Grimm, the 4th Circuit ruled that Grimm’s school district should have deferred to the Obama administration’s directive on Title IX. That directive said the law, which protects against sex-based discrimination in federally funded education programs, also protects against gender identity discrimination. Grimm’s school district appealed to the Supreme Court. But earlier this year, the Trump administration rescinded the Obama directive, stopping short of saying that gender identity isn’t protected by Title IX but stressing there must be “due regard” for states and school districts “in establishing educational policy.” The action prompted SCOTUS to send Grimm’s case back to the 4th Circuit, which may decide whether gender identity is protected under Title IX.
– SCOTUS is more likely to take up an issue when the lower courts have split. But attorney Joseph Wardenski, who argued Whitaker’s case in the 7th Circuit, said that so far, the federal appeals courts have all sided with transgender students. Wardenski said he believes the precedent set by the 7th Circuit will reverberate in other courts nationwide.
– Whitaker and Grimm are expected to graduate high school in the coming weeks. During a call with reporters Tuesday, Whitaker’s mom Melissa said her son would be starting at the University of Wisconsin-Madison this fall and he’s interested in biomedical engineering. “Transgender people everywhere just want to be recognized and understood for who they are,” Melissa said, her voice breaking with emotion. “No parent, no mother, no father, no family member ever wants to see their child go through discrimination.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8t

 

In Race for Test-Takers, ACT Outscores SAT – for Now
But both organizations are making a strong play for statewide test markets
Education Week

The University of Pennsylvania reached a milestone of sorts with its fall entering class: For the first time, more students had taken the ACT than the SAT.
The changeover at the Ivy League university in Philadelphia reflects a more general shift taking place in the college-entrance-exam marketplace.
“The momentum has clearly been on the ACT side,” said Eric Furda, Penn’s admissions dean.
In fact, the ACT has been the most popular test used to predict college performance since 2012. Last year, more than 2.09 million (or 64 percent of graduates from the high school class of 2016) took the ACT compared with the SAT’s 1.64 million. Some believe the ACT will remain dominant, since more states give it for free during the school day, and the jittery students who abandoned the SAT during its 2016 redesign will be hard to win back.
Others see the market recalibrating and both testing organizations on solid footing, since the ACT and SAT tests can be used as accountability measures under the Every Student Succeeds Act, and are preferred in some states over the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers and Smarter Balanced assessments.
The College Board is not down for the count, though.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8F

 

Teachers Unions Prepare for Thousands of Lost Members as New Case Moves Toward the Supreme Court
The 74

In 2016, public sector unions were granted a reprieve when U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died unexpectedly. The court had already heard oral arguments in Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, which challenged the 40-year-old Abood decision compelling workers who choose not to join a unionized workforce to pay an “agency fee” to cover the costs of collective bargaining.
The court deadlocked 4?4 ? an impasse court-watchers believed Scalia would have broken with a vote to end mandated fees, forcing public sector unions to subsist only on dues voluntarily obtained from members.
The split decision put an end to Friedrichs but gave rise to several similar complaints. With Neil Gorsuch now occupying Scalia’s seat, the court likely has the appetite for another agency fee case. That case may be Janus v. AFSCME: the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, in dismissing the case earlier this year, said, “Of course, only the Supreme Court has the power, if it so chooses, to overrule Abood … Neither the district court nor this court can overrule Abood, and it is Abood that stands in the way of [the plaintiff’s] claim.”
Last year, unions hoped public pressure would force the Republican-led Senate under President Obama to take up his nomination of Merrick Garland for the ninth seat. They also devoted their energy and resources to electing Hillary Clinton, whose court choice could have stalled any further agency fee cases for years.
Now the unions, particularly teachers unions, must face the probability of operating and financing in an entirely new way. Their first order of business is to prepare not only for lost fees, but the loss of members.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8s

 

Kansas Senate agrees to school finance formula, but warnings from Democrats continue
Kansas City (MO) Star

TOPEKA — Legislators in the Kansas Senate agreed on a new school finance formula Tuesday amid calls by Democrats that the funding in the bill will trouble the Kansas Supreme Court and trigger a special session where changes to the system would have to be made.
The Senate gave initial approval to the new school finance formula in the latest step forward in the contentious debate in Kansas over how much money to spend on public schools across the state.
The Kansas Supreme Court said in March that Kansas had failed to ensure adequate funding for public schools. Lawmakers have been working to find a path forward ever since.
“We feel like we’ve satisfied the adequacy and the equity portion,” Senate Majority Leader Jim Denning, an Overland Park Republican, said about the formula before the debate. “Should the Supreme Court disagree with that, we will come back for special session and sort it out.”
Under the plan, Denning said public schools in Kansas would see a boost of roughly $165 million next school year and then an additional increase of around $73 million the following year. Increases in the years after are tied to inflation, similar to the House version.
“My prediction is that we will end up being back here in July if we pass a plan that is this inadequate,” Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley, a Topeka Democrat, said during the debate.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8l

http://gousoe.uen.org/a8m (AP)

 

Elementary and middle school math set to change
Raleigh (NC) News & Observer

RALEIGH — Students in kindergarten through eighth grade will learn math according to revised state standards beginning in 2018, if the State Board of Education approves the new guidelines Thursday as expected.
It would be the last step in retooling Common Core standards for math and English.
The new guidelines for math were written so they are easier for teachers and parents to understand, although learning concepts rather than simply memorizing formulas would remain the focus for students.
“We’ve not changed the difficulty or lowered the bar on what we expect students to know,” said Jennifer Curtis, the state Department of Public Instruction section chief for K-12 mathematics.
Standards describe what students should know by the end of each grade. Local districts decide how they are taught. Districts, schools, and teachers choose the materials used in classrooms.
Math and English/language arts instruction became a focus of parent and legislative fury after schools began using Common Core standards in 2012. Some parents denounced the math standards as confusing and frustrating for them and their children.
Common Core standards were developed under the sponsorship of the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers, and were presented as the way to better prepare students for college and jobs.
Legislators tried to force changes, but plans for revisions ended up following the typical five-year cycle for changes to standards.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8q

 

Recent immigrants to the U.S. are better educated: report
Reuters

CHICAGO | Nearly half the recent immigrants to the United States have college degrees, reflecting a steady increase in educational attainment fueled partly by growing numbers of arrivals from Asia, according to a study released on Thursday.
Between 2011 and 2015, 48 percent of more than 3.3 million immigrants to the United States had bachelor’s degrees, up from 27 percent in the five years through 1990, according to an analysis of U.S. Census data by the Migration Policy Institute, a Washington-based nonpartisan think tank.
That increase drove up the overall proportion of college graduates among all immigrant adults to 30 percent in 2015, from 20 percent in 1990, the study said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8D

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8E (Migrant Policy Institute)

 

U.S. Department of Education Launches New Idea Website
Site features updated and expanded information, improved navigation and design
U.S. Department of Education

Today, the U.S. Department of Education launched a new website dedicated to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos directed the Department to expedite the development of a new, updated and more robust site specific to the IDEA after the Department’s Building the Legacy: IDEA 2004 (Legacy) site experienced a prolonged outage in February due to technical issues.
“The launch of this new and improved site is a big win for children with disabilities, their families and the entire IDEA community,” said Secretary DeVos. “It is incumbent upon the government to provide accessible and accurate information to our citizens. That’s why one of my first actions as Secretary was to order the Department to fix and revitalize its woefully outdated IDEA site so that parents, educators and service providers could readily access the resources they need.
“The Department will continue to improve upon the new site by seeking and incorporating feedback from IDEA stakeholders in the coming months. We are committed to ensuring all children with disabilities and their families have the supports and services guaranteed under the IDEA.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/a8C

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

June 1:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
8:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 2:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 8:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
10 a.m., The Leonardo, East Classroom, 209 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

June 20:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

June 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

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