Education News Roundup: June 2, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

State Board of Education looks at education services at the Utah State Hospital.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a97 (DN)
or more information
http://gousoe.uen.org/a98 (USBE)

D-News looks at the Our Schools Now kickoff.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a90 (DN)

Utah Business takes a long look at STEAM education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9x (Utah Business)

Ed Week looks at school spending nationally.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9o (Ed Week)

New report finds 21 percent of Utah students are taking a foreign language class. Most popular in order? Spanish, French, German.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a93 (Ed Week)
or a copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/a94 (American Councils)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

State School Board to consider future of education services at Utah State Hospital

Initiative to raise taxes to fund education kicks off next week

Pumping STEAM: Opportunities to enrich computer science education

Math camp teaches students to solve problems in fun, creative ways

Are Utah’s minority children getting everything they need?
According to the Voices for Utah Children, there are growing disparities between minority and non-minority children in Utah.

Experts and teachers disagree on the intensity of Pre-K

Graduates celebrate high school completion, new beginnings

Attorneys for Clearfield Job Corps contractor want federal judge to toss lawsuit

Stewart named new Principal at KHS

Passport program helps kids explore S.L. County culture

OPINION & COMMENTARY

The dangers of being a star athlete

Why Medicaid matters in Utah, and beyond

How math education can catch up to the 21st century

Why Trump Is Right to Cut Federal Education Spending

Faith-Based Schools Matter. Here’s Why
Faith-based ed. has a history of serving marginalized and immigrant communities

NATION

K-12 Spending: Where the Money Goes

How Much Foreign Language Is Being Taught in U.S. Schools?

Solving the Rural Education Gap: Experts Weigh In on New Report’s Findings Tying Gap to Prosperity
Rural women outpace rural men in educational attainment at all degree levels, USDA report finds

Some Hires by Betsy DeVos Are a Stark Departure From Her Reputation

White House orders agencies to ignore Democrats’ oversight requests
Trump’s aides are trying to shut down the release of information that could be used to attack the president.

ACT official won’t explain Ohio students’ test snafu due to “security”

Spelling bee: Ananya Vinay of Fresno, Calif., wins with ‘marocain’

History Unerased aims to cast light on gay Americans in schools

Nevada leaders deal blows to school vouchers, paid sick time

Super Soaker Inventor Takes Aim at Funding High School Robotics Teams

Strict bedtime rules can help kids get enough sleep

 

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UTAH NEWS
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State School Board to consider future of education services at Utah State Hospital

SALT LAKE CITY — The State School Board may chart a new path for educational services for youths receiving treatment at the Utah State Hospital as the current five-year agreement with Provo City School District is set to expire.
On Friday, the Utah State Board of Education will consider a recommendation to extend the agreement by one year and convene a working group to explore other options and issues such as funding for the contracted services. The annual state appropriation for the contract services, which is $1,153,200, has not been increased since the 1980s, according to state education officials.
No agency has requested an increased appropriation, according to the Office of the Utah Legislative Fiscal Analyst.
The State School Board’s Law and Licensing Committee also recommended that the working group visit the Oak Springs School, which is part of the pediatric unit on the state hospital campus and serves up to 72 students a year, said Glenna Gallo, state special education director.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a97 (DN)

More information
http://gousoe.uen.org/a98 (USBE)

 

Initiative to raise taxes to fund education kicks off next week

SALT LAKE CITY — Backers of the Our Schools Now citizens initiative that would raise taxes some $700 million for education are expected to kick off their campaign next week to win a place on the November 2018 ballot.
Although Utah Jazz owner Gail Miller and the other business leaders behind the initiative initially announced they wanted to raise the income tax rate by seven-eighths of 1 percent, they’re now expected to also seek a state sales tax increase.
The initiative language that will be submitted to the lieutenant governor’s office is believed to ask voters to approve boosting the state sales tax rate from 4.7 percent to 5.2 percent, and the state income tax rate from 5 percent to 5.5 percent.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a90 (DN)

 

Pumping STEAM: Opportunities to enrich computer science education

Phenomenal growth in Utah’s tech industry continues to garner national attention. But even with great benefits and opportunities, and some serious geek cred, companies in Utah are having a hard time filling thousands of vacancies.
“We have great universities and fantastic technology roots, but if we want to accommodate all the growth, we’re not keeping up,” says Sara Jones, co-founder of Women Technology Council (WTC). “Utah is really struggling to find technology talent.”
The seeds of a strong talent harvest are planted in elementary school—but most schools don’t offer a robust computer science curriculum. In fact, computer science courses are offered in only half of Utah high schools. With more than 41,000 AP exams taken in Utah last year, only 129 were for computer science, and only 12 of those computer science tests were taken by girls.
What if you’re a parent who wants to foster computer skills in your children? Or what if you want to broaden your own knowledge of computer science and coding—either to deepen your skill set or to switch careers? Utah is home to a variety of platforms available to help people find their tech niche.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9x (Utah Business)

 

Math camp teaches students to solve problems in fun, creative ways

FARMINGTON — In a classroom at Navajo Preparatory School today, Henry Fowler, a co-director for the Navajo Nation Math Circles Project, was breaking down a mathematics equation with the help of 16 students.
The students — from middle and high schools in New Mexico, Arizona and Utah — sat in small clusters and verbalized their answers to Fowler.
“You don’t have to be so prescribed by only doing the textbook way, the teacher way. Be creative, make up your own story,” Fowler said before returning to the math problem on the dry-erase board.
This week, Navajo, Apache and Hopi students are participating in a camp organized by the Navajo Nation Math Circles Project. The camp is pairing 35 students with mathematicians from universities across the United States to work on challenging mathematical problems by using creative techniques and critical-thinking skills.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9v (Farmington [NM] Daily Times)

 

Are Utah’s minority children getting everything they need?
According to the Voices for Utah Children, there are growing disparities between minority and non-minority children in Utah.

Utah is growing increasingly more diverse as the years go by, and state legislators are working toward expanding equity for children of all racial backgrounds in Utah.
But are we still falling short?
In an effort to examine the impact of the 2017 Legislative Session on minority children in Utah, the Voices for Utah Children released a report that outlines the good, the bad and the ugly.
According to the VUC, the percentage of children of color in Utah has grown from 17 percent in 2000 to more than 25 percent today, and nearly 16 percent of children in Utah are from immigrant families.
“Because we’re becoming a more diverse state, if disparities continue to widen, they threaten to hinder our state’s future success as a whole,” said Jessie Mandle, senior health policy analyst for VUC. “We’ll see that impact across children of all races and ethnicity.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9c (SGS)

 

Experts and teachers disagree on the intensity of Pre-K

A recent study about the intensity of pre-school got attention from The New York Times. The study says kids involved in a more rigorous program are ahead at the end of Kindergarten.
Some parents and teachers disagree.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9d (KUTV)

 

Graduates celebrate high school completion, new beginnings

Adorned in various colored caps and gowns, Iron County high schools completed its graduation ceremonies last Tuesday and Wednesday at Cedar High School, Parowan High School and the Southern Utah University Centrum Arena.
Last Tuesday approximately 60 students from Southwest Education Academy jumped for joy and shared their gratitude with their teachers for the ability to graduate high school, some even earlier than expected.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9w (Iron County Today)

 

Attorneys for Clearfield Job Corps contractor want federal judge to toss lawsuit

SALT LAKE CITY — A federal judge is weighing a defense motion to dismiss a wrongful-death lawsuit filed by the mother of a teenage girl who died at the Clearfield Job Corps Center in 2014.
Management and Training Corp. which operates the center under contract with the U.S. Labor Department, has asked U.S. District Court Judge Clark Waddoups to throw out the case because the woman already lost an administrative claim. Attorneys for MTC argue federal law places that administrative action as the final step in resolving such a dispute.
Isela Huerta Carranza, 17, died March 10, 2014, on the Clearfield vocational training campus. Her mother, Adriana Delaluz of Idaho Falls, Idaho, alleged in a suit filed Feb. 18, 2016, that the MTC staff was negligent in dealing with the teen’s diabetic condition before she suffered seizures and cardiac arrest.
The suit was filed in 2nd District Court in Farmington. There, Judge Thomas Kay ruled against MTC’s initial dismissal motion on Jan. 4. The judge ruled the administrative barrier applied only to “instruments” of government agencies — he said MTC is not covered because it is a private contractor.
Kay also refused to dismiss Delaluz’s claim that MTC slandered Carranza by suggesting she had used alcohol and drugs. Quoting Utah law, Kay said the state’s definition of slander “expressly prohibits malicious defamation tending to blacken the memory of one who is dead.”
At that point, MTC petitioned to move the case to U.S. District Court, where it again is seeking dismissal of the suit.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9b (OSE)

 

Stewart named new Principal at KHS

Kane School District is pleased to announce Trevor Stewart has been selected to be the new principal of Kanab High School
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9y (SUN)

 

Passport program helps kids explore S.L. County culture

WEST JORDAN — Salt Lake County leaders want young residents to learn and explore the area while having fun, which is why they created the Kids Summer Passport tour.
“We wanted everyone to have a great summer and explore Salt Lake County,” Mayor Ben McAdams said.
The zoos, arts and parks program invites children ages 17 and younger to pick up a passport booklet at any Salt Lake County library. Then they’re encouraged to got to five of 28 destinations listed in the passport and receive a stamp at each place. The options include various museums, arts festivals, classes, theaters and parks.
After children have received five stamps in their passports, they are eligible to attend the Final Destination Celebration — a party planned for Aug. 30 that will include IMAX movies and drawings for free prizes at Clark Planetarium.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a99 (DN)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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The dangers of being a star athlete
Deseret News op-ed by Arianne Brown, a mother of seven young children

As I stood on the sideline of a recent State Cup soccer game for my oldest son, Anderson, I watched as he stole the ball from his opponent and turned it toward the goal. After successfully dribbling in and out of several players, he was on his way to scoring.
I cheered loud and proud for my boy. My cheers, however, were cut short because suddenly, Anderson was clipped from behind while two other players came at him from either side, causing him to do do a near flip in the air before landing hard on the ground.
I shook my head in both sadness and frustration because while his efforts earned a foul and a free kick, this was one of seemingly countless times he had been double or triple teamed, resulting in an injury. Why? Because he is a standout player on his team who other teams see as a threat.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9a

 

Why Medicaid matters in Utah, and beyond
(St. George) Spectrum op-ed by Leigh Washburn, Iron County Democrats

One of my grandsons is hearing-impaired. He required sign language interpreters and special classes to help him through school. He succeeded admirably.
Another grandson has Type I Diabetes and, especially early on, needed help from school nurses for blood sugar monitoring and insulin injections.
My 91-year-old father is a retired teacher living with his wife in a comfortable nursing home in Iowa. His entire income pays a fraction of the actual cost.
The common thread in all this is Medicaid, which most of us don’t associate with school special education and health programs and help for the middle-class elderly who have depleted their assets simply to survive.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9u

 

How math education can catch up to the 21st century
The Conversation commentary by Mary E. Pilgrim, Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education, Colorado State University, and Thomas Dick, Professor of Mathematics, Oregon State University

In 1939, the fictional professor J. Abner Pediwell published a curious book called “The Saber-Tooth Curriculum.”
Through a series of satirical lectures, Pediwell (or the actual author, education professor Harold R. W. Benjamin) describes a Paleolithic curriculum that includes lessons in grabbing fish with your bare hands and scaring saber-toothed tigers with fire. Even after the invention of fishnets proves to be a far superior method of catching fish, teachers continued teaching the bare-hands method, claiming that it helps students develop “generalized agility.”
Pedwill showed how curricula can become entrenched and ritualistic, failing to respond to changes in the world around it. In math education, the problem is not quite so dire – but it’s time to start breaking a few of our own traditions. There’s a growing interest in emphasizing problem-solving and understanding concepts over skills and procedures. While memorized skills and procedures are useful, knowing the underlying meanings and understanding how they work builds problem-solving skills so that students may go beyond solving the standard book chapter problem.
As education researchers, we see two different ways that educators can build alternative mathematics courses. These updated courses work better for all students by changing what they teach and how they teach it.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9m

 

Why Trump Is Right to Cut Federal Education Spending
Real Clear Education op-ed by Lance Izumi, Koret senior fellow in education studies and senior director of the Center for Education at the Pacific Research Institute

President Trump’s proposed cuts to the federal education budget have elicited the usual howls of dismay and condemnation from the education establishment. Yet, drill down into the actual cuts and there are a lot of good reasons to put these programs on the chopping block.
Take, for example, the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) program, which established before- and after-school programs, plus summer programs, aimed at improving student academic outcomes. President Trump’s budget eliminates this $1.2 billion program. In response, liberal defenders of federal government education spending went nuts.
The liberal Center for American Progress (CAP) cited an Oregon after-school and summer-school program that it said would lose “enrichment opportunities that provide a well-rounded educational experience, including sports, art classes, off-site field trips, and vital summer school courses.” While offering flowery verbiage, the CAP failed to cite hard data to show that this program or CCLC programs overall are raising student outcomes.
The Trump administration points out that “overall program performance data show that the program is not achieving its goal of helping students, particularly those who attend low-performing schools, meet challenging State academic standards.”
In particular, the administration points out that “on average from 2013 to 2015, less than 20 percent of program participants improved from not proficient to proficient or above on State assessments in reading and mathematics.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9t

 

Faith-Based Schools Matter. Here’s Why
Faith-based ed. has a history of serving marginalized and immigrant communities
Education Week op-ed by John Schoenig, senior director of teacher formation and education policy for the University of Notre Dame’s Alliance for Catholic Education

From their origins as the progenitors of the American urban education system through the demographic shifts that characterized so much of the latter half of the 20th century, faith-based schools have always mattered a great deal to our K-12 landscape. In many ways, they matter now more than ever.
They matter because of their legacy of serving the most marginalized—often recently arrived immigrant—children and families. They matter because they produce graduates who are more likely to vote and give charitably and be tolerant of diverse views. They matter because they have been the bedrock of so many of our most at-risk communities for generations, providing a high-quality education at a fraction of the cost of their traditional public school counterparts. They matter because, at their best, they will stop at nothing to help their students realize the greatness for which each and every one of them was made.
For all the reasons that faith-based schools matter today, the most urgent and important may be the unique and integral role they play in attending to the alarming inequality of educational opportunity that many of our most at-risk children face. While they represent a small portion of our overall educational ecosystem, these schools are nonetheless vitally important in nurturing the soul of our nation. They challenge children to persist in the face of adversity, to take pride in being constant learners, and to treat others with the infinite dignity with which all of us are endowed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9p

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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K-12 Spending: Where the Money Goes
Education Week

It’s well known among K-12 budget analysts—not to mention school district finance staff—that the vast majority of spending in education occurs on people.
Recently released federal data provide clarity on what’s generally known about the huge amount of money in districts that’s consumed by the salaries and benefits of teachers, administrators, and support staff. The data also offer a general breakdown of how districts spend money in different areas connected to administration, student support, and instruction.
Total spending in the United States’ K-12 system stands at $634 billion, or $11,222 per student for the 2013-14 year, the most recent year where data is available, according to the Condition of Education 2017 report, published by the National Center for Education Statistics.
Salaries and benefits make up a combined 80 percent of school spending, according to the report:
The remainder, as the chart shows, is being spent on purchased services, at 11 percent, a category that includes everything from professional development for teachers to contracts for transportation, food, and janitorial services. The buying of supplies, which NCES says covers everything from textbooks to heating oil, consumes 8 percent of district budgets.
Per-student spending hit its highest point in 2008-09 at $11,699, and then fell every year until 2012-13, when it stabilized and grew slightly, as the economy began to climb out of the financial hole left by the Great Recession.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9o

 

How Much Foreign Language Is Being Taught in U.S. Schools?
Education Week

A first-of-its-kind national survey sought to examine the state of foreign language education in primary and secondary schools, but found a striking “lack of knowledge about foreign language teaching and learning.”
The National K-12 Foreign Language Enrollment Survey sought out data on foreign language course enrollment by state and the number of programs by state. The survey also explored the range of languages that are taught in schools and where. The survey was sponsored by the Language Flagship at the Defense Language and National Security Education Office, which is part of the U.S. Department of Defense.
Coming on the heels of an American Academy of Arts & Sciences report that concluded that the United States —with its mostly monolingual residents —could face social and economic disadvantages in an increasingly multilingual, global society, the surveyors were only able to collect data from 44 percent of the nation’s high school and 38 percent of K-8 schools.
That lack of comprehensive enrollment data on foreign language education in the United States “seriously complicates the analysis of local or national trends, particularly at a time of significant demographic shifts in the U.S. population and a resurgence of interest in foreign language instruction in many school districts around the country,” the report authors argue.
The survey also found that an overwhelming majority of schools do not use a nationally available standardized test to measure how much world language students are learning.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a93

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/a94 (American Councils)

 

Solving the Rural Education Gap: Experts Weigh In on New Report’s Findings Tying Gap to Prosperity
Rural women outpace rural men in educational attainment at all degree levels, USDA report finds
The 74

About half of all U.S. public school districts are considered rural, and they collectively enroll some 12 million students, or one-quarter of the total public school population, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.
Whether these students end up graduating from high school and college, and how they fare in the workforce, is linked inextricably to their rural education experiences, a new report finds.
The study, published in April by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service, sheds light on the state of rural education and its relationship to economic prosperity in regions of the country that played a pivotal part in President Donald Trump’s election.
Among the notable findings:
* While rural Americans are increasingly better educated, those who are older, male, and minority still lag behind their urban counterparts in levels of educational attainment.
* Rural women are increasingly better educated than rural men, with women holding a greater share of degrees at every level.
* Rural counties, such as in Appalachia and the Mississippi Delta, where individuals have the lowest levels of educational attainment struggle with higher overall poverty, child poverty, unemployment, and population loss than other rural counties.
“Median earnings rise with educational attainment in both rural and urban areas … [but] in 2015, median earnings in rural areas were a fraction of those in urban areas for every level of education, with a larger earnings gap at higher levels of education,’’ Alexander Marré, a research agricultural economist at the Department of Agriculture, says in his report.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a95

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/a96 (USDA via Google Docs)

 

Some Hires by Betsy DeVos Are a Stark Departure From Her Reputation
New York Times

WASHINGTON — Since her confirmation as the education secretary, Betsy DeVos has been the Trump cabinet member liberals love to hate, denouncing her as an outof­touch, evangelical billionaire without the desire or capacity to protect vulnerable poor, black, immigrant, gay or transgender students.
But while Ms. DeVos has been reluctant to express sympathy for those groups, she has stacked her administration with appointees whose personal and professional backgrounds challenge the narrative that she has no interest in protecting those vulnerable students.
Among her appointees: a progressive Democrat who believes a broken education system is a form of white supremacy; a sexual assault survivor who is currently in a same­sex marriage; and a second­generation American who ran a federal program that helped undocumented immigrants.
While the education secretary has done little to highlight the diversity in her administration — the department declined to make any of the appointees available for interviews — DeVos watchers say that diversity should encourage critics to focus more on her actions than their preconceptions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9r

 

White House orders agencies to ignore Democrats’ oversight requests
Trump’s aides are trying to shut down the release of information that could be used to attack the president.
Politico

The White House is telling federal agencies to blow off Democratic lawmakers’ oversight requests, as Republicans fear the information could be weaponized against President Donald Trump.
At meetings with top officials for various government departments this spring, Uttam Dhillon, a White House lawyer, told agencies not to cooperate with such requests from Democrats, according to Republican sources inside and outside the administration.
It appears to be a formalization of a practice that had already taken hold, as Democrats have complained that their oversight letters requesting information from agencies have gone unanswered since January, and the Trump administration has not yet explained the rationale.
The declaration amounts to a new level of partisanship in Washington, where the president and his administration already feels besieged by media reports and attacks from Democrats. The idea, Republicans said, is to choke off the Democratic congressional minorities from gaining new information that could be used to attack the president.

The Senate’s Homeland Security and Government Accountability Committee, the primary investigator in that chamber, has received some responses from the Trump administration but has seen several letters only signed by Democrats ignored. Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) wrote Education Secretary Betsy DeVos asking for help addressing the challenges of rural schools and joined with Sen. Tom Carper (D-Del.) to question the security of Trump’s use of a personal cell phone as president. Neither was answered, an aide said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9s

 

ACT official won’t explain Ohio students’ test snafu due to “security”
Columbus (OH) Dispatch

Hundreds of students in Reynoldsburg and several other Ohio school districts had their ACT scores invalidated, but state officials are urging the college-entrance-testing company to reconsider.
According to the Ohio Department of Education, ACT sent incorrect versions of the paper test to 21 school districts that had selected the April 19 testing date as part of a new statewide administration of the exam to all juniors at no cost. Each test date has a different version of the exam.
ACT refused to score the versions provided in error and offered students a voucher to retake the test for free on a later, nationwide testing date.
In addition to the 500 Reynoldsburg students, ACT invalidated tests taken by about 200 other students in central Ohio. They include about 100 students in Zanesville schools, more than 75 at Bishop Ready High School in Columbus, and fewer than 10 in both Dublin Scioto and Delaware Christian high schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a91

http://gousoe.uen.org/a9l (AP)

 

Spelling bee: Ananya Vinay of Fresno, Calif., wins with ‘marocain’
USA Today

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. – Ananya Vinay of Fresno, Calif., is the winner of the 90th Scripps National Spelling Bee.
Ananya, a 12-year-old sixth-grader, captured the championship title by correctly spelling “marocain,” which is a dress fabric made from silk or rayon, during the 36th round of the annual competition Thursday night. The second-place finisher was Rohan Rajeev of Edmond, Okla.
Ananya’s victory broke the bee’s three-year streak of ending in a tie. She wins $40,000 in cash, a trophy and other prizes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9e

http://gousoe.uen.org/a9q (CSM)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a9f (AP)

More information
http://spellingbee.com/

 

History Unerased aims to cast light on gay Americans in schools
Reuters

LOWELL, MASS. | For generations, young Americans could go all the way through high school without learning that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people have long been part of their country’s history.
Spurred by gay rights victories at the Supreme Court and elsewhere in recent years, a Lowell, Massachusetts-based organization called History Unerased is trying to change that by training teachers to bring that knowledge to U.S. classrooms.
“People who we label and understand as LGBTQ today have always existed in every nation, in every belief system, in every ethnicity,” said co-founder Debra Fowler, using a version of the acronym that can mean “lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer or questioning.”
The former high-school teacher started the nonprofit group with a colleague in 2015. It is the only entity licensed by the U.S. Department of Education to provide lesson-ready curricula covering LGBT issues.
The program, which includes historical documents such as newspapers, letters and interviews, ranges from having second-graders talk about a boy who was made fun of in the 1950s for acting differently from his classmates to discussions for high schoolers about the 2015 Supreme Court decision legalizing gay marriage in all 50 states.
The group may face an uphill battle in getting school districts across the nation to incorporate its materials into existing literature, history and science classes because some social conservatives have expressed outrage at the idea of introducing LGBT topics to young students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9k

 

Nevada leaders deal blows to school vouchers, paid sick time
Associated Press

CARSON CITY, Nev. — A feud between Nevada’s political leaders threatened to derail their top legislative priorities and delay the state budget process Thursday following a stalemate in negotiations surrounding the state’s unimplemented school voucher program.
With just four days remaining in the legislative session, Democratic lawmakers in control of the Legislature and Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval exchanged potentially fatal blows to each other’s policy initiatives, including Education Savings Accounts and paid sick leave.
The chain of events was set in motion when Republican lawmakers acknowledged a final political deal had not been reached by refusing to move forward one tenet of overarching budget discussions: a 10 percent recreational marijuana tax that requires bipartisan support to enact.
Democratic senators moved quickly then to pass a bill scrapping the $60 million Sandoval proposed for the voucher program, sending it instead to public schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9n

 

Super Soaker Inventor Takes Aim at Funding High School Robotics Teams
NBC

He created one of the most popular toys on the planet — but the inventor of the “Super Soaker” isn’t done making a splash.
Lonnie Johnson is now focusing on new battery technology, but his most rewarding pursuit may be sharing his knowledge with a new generation of engineers.
The mild-mannered Johnson grew up in Mobile, Alabama at the height of the civil rights movement.
“There was a lot of fear, a lot of anxiety, a lot of stress,” he remembered. “When I was a child the ‘White-only’ bathrooms were still very prevalent.”
He turned that fear into motivation — and a career as a NASA rocket scientist. But his “a-ha” moment came unexpectedly while he was designing a water pump. He had built testing the pump out in a bathroom when he noticed something.
“I thought to myself, ‘Geez, this would make a neat water gun!'” he said. “At that point I decided to put my engineering hat on and design a high performance water gun.”
That idea would change his life.
He built the first prototype for what became “The Super Soaker.”
The toy, which first went on sale in the early 1990’s, eventually topped $1 billion in sales. Johnson also went on to come up with the NERF gun and other toys.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a92

 

Strict bedtime rules can help kids get enough sleep
Reuters

Parents who stick to a set bedtime schedule and enforce rules for nighttime routines may be more likely to have children who get enough sleep during the week than people who are more relaxed about putting kids to bed, a recent Canadian study suggests.
Under Canadian sleep guidelines, children aged 5 to 13 should get at least nine hours of sleep a night and teens aged 14 to 17 should get at least eight hours. For the study, researchers examined survey data from 1,622 parents with at least one child in these age ranges and found kids were 59 percent more likely to meet these minimum sleep guidelines during the week when parents enforced a set bedtime than when they didn’t do this.
“The positive effect of enforcing bedtime rules on weekdays may reflect broader parental expectations, bedtime structure or the proactive nature of rule-setting,” said senior study author Dr. Heather Manson of Public Health Ontario in Toronto.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9i

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9j (BioMed Central Public Health)

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

June 2:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

June 8:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
10 a.m., The Leonardo, East Classroom, 209 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

June 20:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

June 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

July 13:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

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