Education News Roundup: June 5, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Gov. Herbert met with the Utah State Board of Education. Among the topics of discussion: Common Core.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9L (SLT)

BYU Universe looks at the teacher shortage and pay raises aimed at helping alleviate some of that.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aaD (BYU Universe)

Heritage Foundation urges military families be given vouchers for private school education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9O (WaPo)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aay ([Washington, DC] Daily Caller)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Utah governor tells state school board to ‘own’ Common Core education standards

Utah schools rush to fill gaps in teacher shortage

Provo School District to provide ed services at Utah State Hospital for another year

How much more would you pay in taxes to fund education?

Students from Canyons School District win Regional President’s Environmental Youth Award

Layton elementary school students visit outer space, without ever leaving Utah

‘Special problems here:’ Hatch talks Utah’s dire suicide rate, lauds state hotline

Park City to pay new teachers $50,700 a year plus benefits

First-generation Orem high school grad known for family loyalty

SyberJet Aircraft Announces the First Class Utah Aerospace Pathways Graduates

Life-Saving Utah Dog is Rewarded With a Spot in Her Owner’s High School Yearbook

Fire causes up to $300,000 in damage to Highland school

Salt Lake Police respond to fight at middle school as classes break for summer

Summer programs offer food for families, children in need

Free summer lunch program opens in Iron County

CCSD chief academic officer retires, reflects on 45-year career

Longtime Canyon View Middle School principal retiring

Green Canyon High seeks public submissions for school song

Nebo educators honored with Huntsman awards

American Leadership Academy holds commencement exercises for Class of 2017

School board meets with high school, jr. high representatives

Park View students engage with Nebo school board

Orchard Hills students present to Nebo school board

MMHS state science champions for third year in a row

Mathlete Olympiad competition winners named

MMHS welding team plans Fix It Saturday

Welding expo showcases students’ work

Maple Mountain athletes raise funds for Tabitha’s Way

Merit Academy plans a variety of summer camps

David Gneiting appointed Nebo’s American Disabilities Act and civil rights coordinator

Ryan Pitcher appointed as Nebo district procurement officer

DeAnn Nielsen named principal of Maple Mountain High

Heather Balli named principal of Meadow Brook Elementary

Host a School Supply Drive!

Passport program helps kids explore S.L. County culture

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Who deserves praise and criticism this week in Northern Utah?

Children are our most important resource, but public schools don’t treat them that way

LGB question belongs on youth-risk survey

Parsing the Difference Between Education and Indoctrination
For educators, politics in the schoolhouse is a narrow line to walk

Feeding Young Minds: The Importance of School Lunches

NATION

As Trump pushes school choice, Heritage wants to let 800K military kids use public dollars for private education

Lawmakers leave behind school vouchers, face budget dispute

DeVos praises Paris withdrawal, won’t comment on human role in climate change: ‘Certainly, the climate changes’

Climate Science Meets a Stubborn Obstacle: Students

High school boys fear looking ‘weak’ if they report concussions

Principal Serves Up Learning and Laughs as Viral Social Media Star

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Utah governor tells state school board to ‘own’ Common Core education standards

Gov. Gary Herbert said Friday that he continues to receive calls and letters complaining about the Common Core State Standards despite encouraging the Utah Board of Education to move beyond the controversial grade-level benchmarks last year.
Those complaints typically lack specificity, Herbert said, and often lump unrelated areas of academic concern under the umbrella of Common Core, which outlines the minimum math and English skills students are expected to master each year.
Herbert said beyond his annual proposed budget, his office has little authority over the operations of Utah classrooms or the lessons taught.
“Most people think the governor has a lot more to do with public education,” he said. “We have a little bit of a bully pulpit, but, other than that, there’s not a lot that I have to do with making decisions on policy.”
He told school board members Friday there is still work to be done in addressing the disconnect caused by Utah’s adoption of the Common Core in 2010.
State law requires a periodic review of school standards, and various updates have distanced Utah’s grade-level benchmarks from the Common Core, which was developed by a consortium of state leaders and national education experts.
“You, this board, decide what our standards are in the state of Utah,” Herbert said. “This board needs to own that.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9L (SLT)

 

Utah schools rush to fill gaps in teacher shortage

Utah is facing a mass teacher shortage, leaving schools racing to fill vacant teaching positions.
Some Utah school districts like Canyons, Granite and Jordan raised teachers’ pay in hopes of getting teachers to stay in their districts.
Canyons School District has raised the pay for teachers with a bachelor’s degree from $34,334 to $40,500 and for teachers with a master’s degree from $37,538 to $45,000, according to Steve Diamond, Canyons School District human resources director.
“We are raising the teachers’ pay because of the need to be competitive – not just in Utah, but across the country,” Diamond said. “Most teachers’ starting salary is $40,000.”
Granite and Jordan school districts have also increased their teachers’ pay. Granite raised pay 11.67 percent, and Jordan raised pay from $34,000 to $40,000 a year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aaD (BYU Universe)

 

Provo School District to provide ed services at Utah State Hospital for another year

SALT LAKE CITY – The Utah State Board of Education voted unanimously Friday to extend by one year Provo City School District’s contract to provide educational services to youths hospitalized at the Utah State Hospital.
The current five-year agreement was set to expire on June 30, but the State School Board has determined it will study the arrangement over the next year to determine the future delivery of education services at Oak Springs School, which serves pediatric patients at the hospital.
The annual state appropriation for the contract services, which is $1,153,200, has not been increased since the 1980s, according to state education officials. No agency has requested an increased appropriation, according to the Office of the Utah Legislative Fiscal Analyst.
Funding of the contract is one issue a State School Board working group will examine over the next year and bring recommendations to the full board for its consideration.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9U (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aaC (DN via KSL)

 

How much more would you pay in taxes to fund education?

SALT LAKE CITY – Backers of the Our Schools Now citizens initiative that would raise taxes some $700 million for education are expected to kick off their campaign next week to win a place on the November 2018 ballot.
Although Utah Jazz owner Gail Miller and the other business leaders behind the initiative initially announced they wanted to raise the income tax rate by seven-eighths of 1 percent, they’re now expected to also seek a state sales tax increase.
The initiative language that will be submitted to the lieutenant governor’s office is believed to ask voters to approve boosting the state sales tax rate from 4.7 percent to 5.2 percent, and the state income tax rate from 5 percent to 5.5 percent.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aap (DN via KSL)

 

Students from Canyons School District win Regional President’s Environmental Youth Award

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – Four Utah students have won a prestigious award for their work with environmental science.
Abigail Slama-Catron and and Eric Snaufer, who attend Midvale Middle and Timothy Holt and Allison Drennan, who attend Beehive Science and Technology Academy, all won the Environmental Protection Agency’s Regional President’s Environmental Youth Award for their “Bionic Scarecrow.”
The scarecrow was invented to help keep birds away from the wetlands around the Salt Lake International Airport.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aai (KUTV)

 

Layton elementary school students visit outer space, without ever leaving Utah

A Layton school is trying something new to get its students excited about science.
At Vae View Elementary in Layton, the 4th and 5th graders are on a mission in outer space. Today these students are investigating a wormhole.
Cameron Kemp is the flight director. He’s also the person behind the sound effects.
“The attitude that I give them, how I speak with them and the tone of voice and manipulating that on the voice changer really creates the atmosphere to be able to think and react in the Infini D lab,” said Kemp.
Vae View Elementary school’s computer lab is now a spaceship. The program behind the transformation is called Infini D Learning. Casey Vokes founded Infini D Learning. Teachers develop the curriculum and then the professionals at Infini D turn it into mission form.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aaj (KUTV)

 

‘Special problems here:’ Hatch talks Utah’s dire suicide rate, lauds state hotline

SALT LAKE CITY – After trying and failing to take his own life on Oct. 31, 2012, Dave Richards looked up a crisis hotline and laid his eyes on the sequence of numbers that would set him on a new path forever.
“It’s 801-587-3000,” Richards said. “I’ll remember it till the day I die, I promise.”
Richards was on the University of Utah campus telling U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch about the number for the 24/7 CrisisLine call center at the University Neuropsychiatric Institute, which Hatch toured Thursday to ask questions about the services there.
Richards, who lives with bipolar disorder, was at his lowest point following a bout of severe depression. But his simple phone call gave him the hope he needed to deal with his mental illness.
“The worker who answered the phone that night saved my life,” he said. “They installed one thought in me and that was hope. … I am by no means cured, but I am still alive and I am very happy for that.”

On a busy day, workers at the University Neuropsychiatric Institute receive up 300 calls, said Don Fennimore, supervisor of the institute’s mobile crisis outreach teams. Fennimore said the mobile teams, who use unmarked cars and can conduct visits with more consideration for privacy than a paramedic in an ambulance, make anywhere from three to 20 visits each day to callers who request in-person intervention.
That’s on top of the influx of users who now message the center using the SafeUT app – a crisis intervention tool marketed specifically toward teenagers, but also used by others. Call center workers, all of whom have the requisite social work training, frequently engage in several conversations per day with SafeUT app users.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9N (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aao (DN via KSL)

 

Park City to pay new teachers $50,700 a year plus benefits

PARK CITY – In the latest salvo of the so-called Utah teacher salary wars, the Park City School District announced Wednesday it will pay starting teachers $50,700 a year plus benefits beginning this fall.
Moreover, every licensed teacher in the Park City School District will receive a salary increase of $7,000 under the agreement negotiated between the school district and the Park City Education Association and announced at a year-end event at Park City High School Wednesday. The Park City Board of Education approved the agreement earlier in the day.
School districts across the country are competing to attract the nation’s best teachers, said Tim McConnell, associate superintendent over human resources.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aam (DN via KSL)

 

First-generation Orem high school grad known for family loyalty

Orem . A daughter of Mexican immigrants is on her way to becoming her family’s first college student after graduating high school in Orem while also juggling caregiver duties for her younger siblings.
It is not uncommon for Vanessa Ayala to put her family first, the Daily Herald reported. Throughout high school, the 18-year-old said she has constantly turned down invitations to hang out with friends or school events to take care of her younger siblings, ages 9 and 6 months, while her parents are away at work. She said she has had to take her younger brother with her to class, clubs and work on several occasions.
Her school’s administration understood her situation and allowed the boy to read books while Ayala paid attention in class.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aau (AP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a9S (AP via SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a9W (AP via OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aal (AP via KSL)

 

SyberJet Aircraft Announces the First Class Utah Aerospace Pathways Graduates

CEDAR CITY, Utah – SyberJet Aircraft is pleased to announce the first class of graduates from the Utah Aerospace Pathways program. A total of twelve students from the Iron County School District participated in the program and were present for the official graduation today in Cedar City.
MSC Aerospace and SyberJet Aircraft are proud to be a part of this program that will help to fill high paying, innovative aerospace jobs in the southern Utah area for years to come. A partnership with the state of Utah and industry, the Utah Aerospace Pathways program was initiated in April 2016 and prepares graduating high school students with the skills and knowledge for a rewarding, long-term career in aerospace manufacturing. This pilot project was created and endorsed by industry, government and education leaders for high school students in various school districts throughout Utah.
Students who graduate from the program with a certificate in aerospace manufacturing will have demonstrated knowledge and proficiency in basic manufacturing and will have completed specific classroom studies including Precision Sheet Metal Assembly, Manufacturing Principles, Tool Usage/Safety, Environmental Health, Precision Measuring Instruments, Organizational Awareness, Applied Math, and Aerospace Blueprint Reading.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aar (KCSG)

 

Life-Saving Utah Dog is Rewarded With a Spot in Her Owner’s High School Yearbook

Almost all high school students flip eagerly through their yearbooks to find their photos, but for Coalville, Utah’s Hailee Blonquist, this year’s class lineup revealed a delightful surprise: The “student” pictured next to her was her golden retriever, Katie, a service dog that has come to school with her every day for the past two years.
“I thought they might stick a picture of her somewhere in the yearbook, but to see her right next to me as ‘Katie Blonquist’ was pretty cool,” Hailee, 17, a junior at North Summit High School, tells PEOPLE. “Everyone loves Katie. She’s always been by my side.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aaG (People)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aaF (DN)

 

Fire causes up to $300,000 in damage to Highland school

HIGHLAND – Investigators were looking at fireworks as the possible cause of a fire that caused between $200,000 and $300,000 at Ridgeline Elementary School early Sunday.
The fire was reported just after midnight. It started on the roof above the kindergarten rooms, said Alpine School District spokeswoman Kim Bird. A photo posted by the district shows a blackened hole on the roof about 30 feet in diameter.
Bird said repairs to the roof trusses, decking and roof membrane will begin this week. Students at Ridgeline Elementary began their summer vacation about a week ago.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9T (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/a9Y (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aak (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aaq (KSTU)

 

Salt Lake Police respond to fight at middle school as classes break for summer

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – Salt Lake Police responded to a middle school in Rose Park Friday afternoon on reports of a large fight between students.
The incident occurred at 1 p.m. outside Northwest Middle School, 1730 N. 1700 West. Salt Lake Police Department spokesman Detective Richard Chipping said a group of around 100 students congregated, but only a handful were actually fighting, and there were no injuries. Police arrived at the scene to disperse the students. Chipping said at one point there was a report that a student may have had a gun, but that turned out to be inaccurate.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aaH (Gephardt Daily)

 

Summer programs offer food for families, children in need

Summer help is available for children and families who can’t afford nutritious food.

Summer Food Program
“The Summer Food Program fills the need in the summer when school is out and kids lose access to school meals,” said Marti Woolford, nutrition initiatives director at Utahns Against Hunger.
“There’s no paperwork. Kids just show up and get a meal,” Woolford said. “A lot of sties are at parks. Those parks may have activities going on.”
Free lunch will be served in school district facilities where high numbers of residents qualify for free and reduced school lunches. All programs have rules, such as lunches must be eaten in the lunchroom and visiting adults must pay for their meals and not eat food from children’s plates.
To find a location, text FOOD to 877877 or visit uah.org for a full list of locations.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9V (OSE)

 

Free summer lunch program opens in Iron County

Free lunches will be offered to low-income families in Cedar City and Enoch this summer.
Children under the age of 18 are eligible for a free lunch at multiple locations in Cedar City and Enoch through Aug. 18.
Lunches will be served from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Cedar City Main Street Park, the Enoch Liberty Park and the Enoch Garden Park.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aaE (SGS)

 

CCSD chief academic officer retires, reflects on 45-year career

In his 10 years in Cache County School District, Craig Ashton donned several hats. He started out as the director of the K-12 math program before becoming the elementary curriculum director, the chief academic officer and assistant superintendent.
But his time in CCSD was only the capstone of a long career in education. Ashton served 33 years in Idaho Falls, taking his first position as an elementary principal at the age of 25. It was in in Idaho where he met current CCSD Superintendent Steve Norton, who at the time was superintendent of the Blackfoot School District.
After Ashton retired in Idaho Falls, he moved to Cache Valley where he has family. He then reached out to Norton and said he would love to work in CCSD. A year later, Ashton received a call and returned to education.
Ten years later, Ashton has announced his retirement from CCSD. According to Norton, hiring Ashton was a wise investment.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aaf (LHJ)

 

Longtime Canyon View Middle School principal retiring

For many students, middle school is one of the most challenging times of their educational career.
Between emerging hormones, home issues, low self-esteem and a fear of embarrassment – these preteen years can be pretty rough.
But Canyon View Middle School Principal Conrad Aitken has been continuously immersed in this for the past 19 years.
But now, after nearly two decades, the beloved principal is retiring.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aah (SGS)

 

Green Canyon High seeks public submissions for school song

A new high school isn’t just brick and mortar. It takes a unique culture, color pattern, logo, apparel and school song.
As Green Canyon High School gets ready to open its doors in the fall, current Sky View High Choir Teacher Karen Teuscher, who will be moving to the new school, came up with the idea to allow the public to create the song that will represent the school for years to come.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aae (LHJ)

 

Nebo educators honored with Huntsman awards

Two Nebo School District educators were honored in May with Huntsman Awards for Excellence in Education. They are J. Merrill Hallam, a science, math and biology teacher at Spanish Fork Junior High School, and Monica Giffing, an agriculture and biology teacher at Springville High School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aa9 (Serve Daily)

 

American Leadership Academy holds commencement exercises for Class of 2017

American Leadership Academy in Spanish Fork held its commencement exercises on May 24. This year, the graduates included 116 seniors and three juniors. Seven of them have already earned their associate’s degree from Utah Valley University, another six have earned certificates from MATC and three more have completed CNA training.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aab (Serve Daily)

 

School board meets with high school, jr. high representatives

The Nebo School District Board of Education and Nebo Superintendent Rick Nielsen meets with students from each of the high schools and junior high schools on a quarterly basis. Each Youth Board representative is selected by his/her principal to be a spokesperson for their school.
In May, the Nebo school board asked the high school Youth Board students questions. The high school students in turn discussed their feelings on preparedness for college and careers, the right amount of homework and the use of social media and technology, specifically one-to-one devices. The students shared out what they liked best about their respective high school’s culture.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aa0 (Serve Daily)

 

Park View students engage with Nebo school board

Park View Elementary School Principal Shanna Stirland expressed her appreciation to the Nebo School Board of Education in a board meeting recently as well as what an honor it is to have served as principal of Park View for the past three years. She loves working with supportive parents, awesome students and hardworking teachers – teachers who are always looking to improve instructional strategies in order to help students become successful.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aa6 (Serve Daily)

 

Orchard Hills students present to Nebo school board

Orchard Hills Elementary School Principal Ryan Murray addressed the Nebo School Board of Education during a recent board meeting and expressed how thankful he is for the wonderful parents that support the great children at Orchard Hills. He is also thankful for the dedicated teachers and introduced one teacher, Tammy Dragger, who then led the students in an orchestra performance to the delight of the board and to all those in attendance.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aa7 (Serve Daily)

 

MMHS state science champions for third year in a row

Nebo School District’s Maple Mountain High School science students are state champions for the third year in a row.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aac (Serve Daily)

 

Mathlete Olympiad competition winners named

The Nebo District Mathlete Olympiad competition was held at Sage Creek Elementary School recently, where 36 top math students competed in the event. The competition was open to fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-graders from across the district. Using Olympiad questions from the MOEMS organization (Math Olympiads for Elementary and Middle Schools), students were given 30 minutes to solve as many advanced math problems as possible, scoring one point for each correct answer.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aa1 (Serve Daily)

 

MMHS welding team plans Fix It Saturday

The Maple Mountain High School SkillsUSA club needs the public’s help to send its Welding Fabrication Team back to Louisville, Kentucky, for the National Competition for the fifth year in a row. On March 24, the MMHS club first place at the state level and was invited back to compete among the top competitors in the country.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aad (Serve Daily)

 

Welding expo showcases students’ work

More than 200 students from 18 high schools participated in the second annual statewide High School Welding Expo on May 20 at the Spanish Fork Fairgrounds.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aa8 (Serve Daily)

 

Maple Mountain athletes raise funds for Tabitha’s Way

As part of the Especially for Athletes program, a group of athletes at Maple Mountain High School recently presented Tabitha’s Way a check for more than $1,000. Especially for Athletes encourages athletes to give back and to set an example for others. Maple Mountain’s group has been an early participant in this program and these athletes are definitely leading by example.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aa2 (Serve Daily)

 

Merit Academy plans a variety of summer camps

Have you heard? Merit Academy is hosting summer camps and classes! These summer experiences will inspire and creativity and excitement for your family all summer long.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aaa (Serve Daily)

 

David Gneiting appointed Nebo’s American Disabilities Act and civil rights coordinator

The Nebo School Board of Education has appointed David Gneiting as the American Disabilities Act and civil rights coordinator for Nebo School District.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aa5 (Serve Daily)

 

Ryan Pitcher appointed as Nebo district procurement officer

The Nebo School Board of Education has appointed Ryan Pitcher as procurement officer for the district.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9Z (Serve Daily)

 

DeAnn Nielsen named principal of Maple Mountain High

The Nebo School District Board of Education has appointed DeAnn Nielsen as principal of Maple Mountain High School in Spanish Fork.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aa4 (Serve Daily)

 

Heather Balli named principal of Meadow Brook Elementary

The Nebo School District Board of Education has appointed Heather Balli as principal of Meadow Brook Elementary School in Springville.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aa3 (Serve Daily)

 

Host a School Supply Drive!

In August, thousands of children will arrive at school without the supplies they need to learn. This year, help United Way of Salt Lake Stuff the Bus with school supplies for more than 10,000 students!
We need 100 companies, community groups, girl and boy scouts, and individuals to host school supply drives! Sign-up to collect supplies listed on the registration form, and drop-them off between July 31 and August 2 at the Columbus Community Center in South Salt Lake (2531 South 400 East) between 9 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Any amount of supplies will help a child in need!
http://gousoe.uen.org/aaI (KCPW)

 

Passport program helps kids explore S.L. County culture

WEST JORDAN – Salt Lake County leaders want young residents to learn and explore the area while having fun, which is why they created the Kids Summer Passport tour.
“We wanted everyone to have a great summer and explore Salt Lake County,” Mayor Ben McAdams said.
The zoos, arts and parks program invites children ages 17 and younger to pick up a passport booklet at any Salt Lake County library. Then they’re encouraged to got to five of 28 destinations listed in the passport and receive a stamp at each place. The options include various museums, arts festivals, classes, theaters and parks.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aan (DN via KSL)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Who deserves praise and criticism this week in Northern Utah?
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

The Standard-Examiner Editorial Board hashes out the positions we take on the Opinion page. Here’s what members recommended last week for praise and criticism.
THUMBS UP: To summer food programs and the organizations and volunteers who run them.
Food insecurity affects people who are poor enough to be on government assistance programs, as well as those who might be just at the threshold for help. Among Weber, Davis and Box Elder counties, food insecurity hovers between 11.6 and 12.8 percent, according to Feeding America.
Access to regular meals would be far more difficult in the summer without the help of more than 30 Northern Utah programs dedicated to serving free lunches for residents who qualify based on income. That’s in addition to the more than 20 food pantries in Northern Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9X

 

Children are our most important resource, but public schools don’t treat them that way
Deseret News op-ed by M. Donald Thomas, a retired superintendent of schools and a national education consultant, and Lynn Stoddard, who has 67 years of experience as a teacher, principal and education leader

Public schools have lost their way. They have strayed from their important historical mission of educated individuals to be productive and effective citizens. Ever since Thomas Jefferson’s lofty vision of what education should do, public schools have gradually sunk into a purposeless, subject-guided effort of standardizing students with a narrow, limited curriculum. Expensive high-stakes testing, large class sizes and countless rules and regulations occupy valuable time and resources that direct teachers’ efforts, making it impossible to concentrate on students and their personal needs.
Subject-matter-based education discriminates against all but a few who may be strong in language and mathematical reasoning. It denies proper recognition of children who are strong in more important human talents: leadership, creativity, initiative, curious inquiry, organization, emotional sensitivity and other social skills needed to be successful in adult life. Schools also discriminate on the basis of socio-economic status. The affluent are rewarded for their abilities and the poor are denied the equal opportunity of developing theirs.
What should be done? Utah should lead the way toward a student-oriented education system that has many advantages over subject-controlled education. Under an SOE system, many contributions are attained with a reduction in bullying, dropouts, failures, anti-social acts and school-induced suicides.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9M

 

LGB question belongs on youth-risk survey
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Frank Ascione

The decision of Cache County School District (CCSD) to refuse to include a question about sexual orientation on a nationally recognized youth risk behavior survey precludes a better understanding of LGB students’ and other young people’s heightened risk for suicide, depression, and other mental health challenges.
As a developmental psychologist, taxpayer, parent, and grandparent I have sought to understand the reason for CCSD’s refusal.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aag

 

Parsing the Difference Between Education and Indoctrination
For educators, politics in the schoolhouse is a narrow line to walk
Education Week op-ed by Jonathan Zimmerman, co-author with Emily Robertson of The Case for Contention: Teaching Controversial Issues in American Schools

Politics have become a minefield in American schools. Just ask a principal in New York City, who is under investigation for communist-linked organizing in her school.
Yes, you read that right. Back in March, officials at the city’s department of education informed Jill Bloomberg, the principal at the secondary school Park Slope Collegiate in Brooklyn, that she was under investigation for political organizing during school hours on behalf of the Progressive Labor Party.
Bloomberg, who denies the claims, has been an open critic of the city’s public schools since 2010. She has organized protests on behalf of her students-a majority of whom are black and Latino-over what she considers to be unequal actions by the city’s department of education that promote racial segregation and inequality. She also supported her students in resisting the addition of metal detectors and helped organize school assemblies about police brutality.
Now, Bloomberg has countered the district’s investigation with a lawsuit, alleging that district officials violated her right to freely criticize charter schools and school district policies.
Across the country, in the time of Donald Trump, educators have been declaring their opinions about our voluble president and his policies on immigration, schools, and much else. As citizens, educators must be free to hold whatever viewpoints they wish. If school officials singled out Jill Bloomberg because of her beliefs, as she claims (and they deny), they should suspend their probe and apologize profusely to her and the school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aax

 

Feeding Young Minds: The Importance of School Lunches
New York Times commentary by columnist JANE E. BRODY

Harding Senior High, a public school in St. Paul, Minn., has long been known as a 90­90­90 school: 90 percent of students are minorities, nearly 90 percent come from poor or struggling families and, until recently, 90 percent graduate (now about 80 percent) to go on to college or a career.
Impressive statistics, to be sure. But perhaps most amazing about this school is that it recognizes and acts on the critical contribution that adequate food and good nutrition make to academic success. Accordingly, it provides three balanced meals a day to all its students, some of whom might otherwise have little else to eat on school days.
For those who can’t get to school in time for early breakfast, a substitute meal is offered after first period, to be eaten during the second period. Every student can pick up dinner at the end of the school day, and those who play sports after school can take the dinner with them to practices and games.
To Jennifer Funkhauser, a French teacher at Harding and hands­on participant in the meal program, making sure the students are well fed is paramount to their ability to succeed academically. Ms. Funkhauser and the staff at Harding are well aware of the many studies showing that children who are hungry or malnourished have a hard time learning.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aaB

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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As Trump pushes school choice, Heritage wants to let 800K military kids use public dollars for private education
Washington Post

The conservative Heritage Foundation is pushing to allow 800,000 military children to use federal tax dollars for private education, a proposal that comes as President Trump seeks to make good on his promise to dramatically expand school choice nationwide.
Under the Heritage proposal, military children would be able to elect to leave their public schools and instead receive a lump sum – an “education savings account” – that they could put toward private school tuition, tutoring or online school.
The proposal would require redirecting money from $1.3 billion in “impact aid” funds that currently go to support public school districts near military bases and tribal lands, spending that has enjoyed bipartisan support in Congress. But Lindsey Burke, an education policy analyst at Heritage, argues that it is a way to support military families – a matter of national defense, she said – and would dramatically expand the universe of private-school choice.
Nearly 450,000 children use public funds to pay for private education nationwide. Heritage would like to see all 800,000 school-age children of active-duty families eligible for the same, including in states that don’t allow private-school choice. About 750,000 of those children attend Defense Department-run schools on base or local public schools off base, according to a policy brief the foundation published Friday. “That’s a lot of kids,” Burke said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9O

http://gousoe.uen.org/aay ([Washington, DC] Daily Caller)

 

Lawmakers leave behind school vouchers, face budget dispute
Associated Press

CARSON CITY, Nev.- Shaking his head and looking down one of his signature patterned bow ties, the Democratic leader of the Nevada Senate said last week there was no version of a program to spend public dollars on private schooling that he could imagine himself supporting this session.
Senate Majority Leader Aaron Ford’s personal grappling was the epitome of a Democratic legislative majority so fundamentally opposed to giving families hundreds or thousands of taxpayer dollars apiece to move their children from public to private schools that they decided this week to effectively trade several of their policy priorities for the death of Education Savings Accounts.
Lawmakers have sent the bulk of the state budget to Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval. But with ESAs off the table, a massive funding shortfall caused by the political fallout and significant energy and health-related bills yet to pass out of the Legislature, lawmakers are expected to work until their constitutionally mandated Monday night deadline to finish business.
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9R

 

DeVos praises Paris withdrawal, won’t comment on human role in climate change: ‘Certainly, the climate changes’
Washington Post

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, who on Thursday praised President Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate change accord, declined to comment Friday on the extent to which human activity has driven climate change over the last half-century.
She instead reiterated her praise for Trump’s decision during a visit to a D.C. charter school, saying that he had “made good on a promise to ensure that the American people are not subject to overreach” and “fulfilled a commitment to keep America first and to focus on American jobs.”
Pressed by reporters for her personal views on climate change, DeVos said: “Certainly, the climate changes. Yes.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9P

http://gousoe.uen.org/aaA (Newsweek)

A copy of the statement
http://gousoe.uen.org/a9Q (ED)

 

Climate Science Meets a Stubborn Obstacle: Students
New York Times

WELLSTON, Ohio – To Gwen Beatty, a junior at the high school in this proud, struggling, Trump­supporting town, the new science teacher’s lessons on climate change seemed explicitly designed to provoke her.
So she provoked him back.
When the teacher, James Sutter, ascribed the recent warming of the Earth to heat­trapping gases released by burning fossil fuels like the coal her father had once mined, she asserted that it could be a result of other, natural causes.
When he described the flooding, droughts and fierce storms that scientists predict within the century if such carbon emissions are not sharply reduced, she challenged him to prove it. “Scientists are wrong all the time,” she said with a shrug,
echoing those celebrating President Trump’s announcement last week that the United States would withdraw from the Paris climate accord.
When Mr. Sutter lamented that information about climate change had been removed from the White House website after Mr. Trump’s inauguration, she rolled her eyes.
“It’s his website,” she said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aaz

 

High school boys fear looking ‘weak’ if they report concussions
Reuters

Male and female high school athletes have moderate levels of knowledge about concussion symptoms, but the boys are much more likely to not report concussions for fear of seeming weak, a small U.S. study suggests.
The reasons boys gave for not wanting to report a concussion tended to center around not wanting coaches or teammates to think they were weak or to “get mad,” researchers report in the Journal of Athletic Training.
“Although males and females have similar concussion symptom knowledge, we still see a negative stigma” with reporting them, lead author Jessica Wallace told Reuters Health by email.
“Especially within male dominated sports, we are seeing that many male athletes are not reporting because they are highly sensitive to how their peers and coaches view them,” said Wallace, an athletic trainer and researcher at Youngstown State University in Ohio.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aas

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/aat (Journal of Athletic Training)

 

Principal Serves Up Learning and Laughs as Viral Social Media Star
Education Week

Whether he’s promoting a mock app to help educators “avoid all them crazy people” they don’t want to see over summer break or offering tongue-in-cheek advice on how to survive state assessments, Gerry Brooks is always ready to mix learning and laughs.
Brooks, principal of Liberty Elementary in Fayette County, Ky., is a social media sensation who uploads laugh-out-loud videos that highlight the lighter side of K-12 education.
Over the past two years, he’s posted more than 120 videos to his YouTube page. His viral video on kindergarten lunchroom duty, which he says is incredibly stressful, has racked up more than 1 million views since he uploaded it last August.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aav

Gerry Brooks YouTube channel
http://gousoe.uen.org/aaw

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

June 8:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
10 a.m., The Leonardo, East Classroom, 209 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

June 20:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

June 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

July 13:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 14:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

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