Education News Roundup: June 9, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

State Charter School Board

State Charter School Board takes a closer look at Pioneer High School for the Performing Arts and Franklin Discovery Academy.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adb (PDH)

Secondary school teacher survey finds most students not naturally interested in STEM subjects.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ad6 (Ed Week)

(Horrific) Thought for the day: “In a very real manner our experiences with popularity are always occupying our minds. We never really left high school at all.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/adn (Atlantic)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

2 Utah County charter schools progressing under Utah State Charter School Board guidance

Ballot initiative aims to reduce class sizes and improve education in Utah

‘Behind the Headlines’: Miller leaves Democratic race and party, Our Schools Now talks sales tax, and why Comey got fired

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Thumbs up, thumbs down

With apologies to Joseph Heller

Sutherland Institute joins coalition urging DeVos to champion education choice policies

Pay raise

What the World Can Teach Us: International Lessons on Choice and Innovation in Education

Can DeVos Assure Federal Protections for Special Ed. Students Using Vouchers?

My transgender son is graduating from high school. But his fight isn’t over.

A lazy summer for teenagers: Why aren’t more of them working?

NATION

Most Students Are Not Naturally Interested in STEM, Teachers Say

How Schools, Parents And Organizations Are Trying To Close The Achievement Gap

Federal education officials reject Alabama’s request to ditch ACT Aspire

DeVos is Questioned About Campaign to Influence Climate Change Education

‘Run!’ Gunfire on a school playground still haunts the first graders who survived

School district considers policy change after teacher arrest

Civil Rights Groups Take New Mexico to Court in Fight Over Equitable Education

Lawsuit: Washington failing to teach special-ed students

DeVos, Philanthropist Heavyweights to Speak at Charter Schools Conference

‘Night School’ Documentary Looks at Adults Seeking an Elusive H.S. Diploma

The Best And Worst Paying Education Jobs In The U.S., 2017

Why Adolescence Lasts Forever
A new book explores the dynamics of popularity, and the ways our high-school selves stay with us far beyond the teenage years.

 

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UTAH NEWS
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2 Utah County charter schools progressing under Utah State Charter School Board guidance

Two Utah County charter schools walked out happy Thursday after meeting with the Utah State Charter School Board in Salt Lake City.
American Fork’s Pioneer High School for the Performing Arts had their warning and turnaround status reduced by the board after tackling about 40 different issues dealing with their school processes. Kevin Long, Pioneer High board member, acknowledged the many problems the school had, but explained “over the past two years, we’ve completely done a 180 degree from that. We’ve made tremendous progress.”
The school which opened in 2012, has been dealing with a solid drop in enrollment numbers, though its retention rate over the past two years has been very high. It received an F grade from the state last year. The school was placed under a warning status in the fall of 2013. In the fall of 2015, it was placed on school turnaround.
The board commended them on their progress and asked that they continue their work. The board cited only three items they now require from Pioneer High: a clean membership audit, enrollment numbers that support a viable operating budget, and an improvement in their academic performance. The board said they will continue to meet with them to oversee these few items.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adb (PDH)

 

Ballot initiative aims to reduce class sizes and improve education in Utah

The Our Schools Now campaign is a ballot initiative effort that would put a question on the ballot in November 2018 asking Utahns if they would raise their own taxes if they could be sure that money went directly to education with a primary goal of reducing class sizes and improving education turnouts in Utah. The initiative is backed by some high-profile business community members as well as long-time education advocates in the state.
This past Tuesday the campaign made it official, filing the paperwork with the Lieutenant Governor’s office to begin the ballot initiative process. This will begin with public hearings and the collection of 113-thousand signatures from residents in at least 26 of Utah’s 29 Senate districts.
On KVNU’s For the People program on Tuesday, Our Schools Now chairman Bob Marquardt told host Jason Williams what has changed from the original proposal of the initiative and what was unveiled this week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ads (CVD)

 

‘Behind the Headlines’: Miller leaves Democratic race and party, Our Schools Now talks sales tax, and why Comey got fired

The Our Schools Now campaign to increase education funding changes to include a sales tax hike. Rob Miller, leaves a Utah Democratic Party race, then the party itself, amid accusations of sexual misconduct. And a poll shows Utahns disagree on why former FBI Director James Comey was fired from his post.
On Friday at 9 a.m., Salt Lake Tribune reporters Benjamin Wood and Matthew Piper, government and politics editor Dan Harrie, and columnist Paul Rolly join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to talk about the week’s top stories.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adt (SLT)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Thumbs up, thumbs down
(Provo) Daily Herald editorial

THUMBS UP: Maple Mountain High School’s SkillsUSA club will be sending its Welding Fabrication Team to the national competition for the fifth year in a row. The dedicated students have been working hard to prepare for the competition since winning the state competition several months ago. They will also be holding a Fix It Saturday, where they will fix or build items for community members, this Saturday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the school to raise money to go to Kentucky in just a few weeks.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adc

 

With apologies to Joseph Heller
Utah Policy commentary by columnists Bryan Schott and Bob Bernick

What a busy week in Utah politics!
The Gary Ott situation in Salt Lake County is a tragic one, but it’s clear that the Utah Legislature is going to have to fix the situation.
A group wants to put a proposed independent redistricting commission before voters in 2018. At the same time, the “Our Schools Now” group launched their own petition drive this week to provide more funding for schools through a sales and income tax hike.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ad5 (video)

 

Sutherland Institute joins coalition urging DeVos to champion education choice policies
Sutherland Institute commentary by education policy analyst Christine Cooke

Today Sutherland Institute joined 12 other leading state and national organizations in sending a letter to Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos praising her outspoken commitment to education choice.
http://gousoe.uen.org/add

 

Pay raise
Deseret News letter from Ron W. Smith

While I celebrate any news that’s good news for public education anywhere in Utah, I do so knowing the downside. The decision in Park City to raise all teachers’ pay there fills a need all major cities and higher-end resort towns face – giving employees enough to live on without long commutes from more affordable locations. Are the raises in Park City enough for that purpose? Will K-12 salaries there now be a magnet for highly successful teachers and, probably especially, teaching couples presently employed elsewhere, giving Park City an advantage few other districts can match given property tax base?
http://gousoe.uen.org/ada

 

What the World Can Teach Us: International Lessons on Choice and Innovation in Education
U.S. Department of Education commentary

Every student in the United States deserves a great education. And, every parent in this country – regardless of background, income or zip code – deserves the right to choose the school that is best for his or her child.
To achieve that goal, Secretary DeVos has called for “a transformation that will open up America’s education system.” If we’re going to meet the diverse needs of today’s learners, we need fresh thinking and innovative approaches. There’s plenty we can learn from other countries, as they strive to prepare their students for 21st century realities.
Those lessons were the subject of a recent briefing at the Department – the first of a new series of learning sessions the Secretary has launched, focused on effective, student-centered education. The speaker was Andreas Schleicher, Director of Education and Skills for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).
Schleicher’s message was simple: Around the world, nations are finding that choice programs can and do contribute to better results for students. If we want school choice to promote equity and excellence for all students, we need to keep it real, relevant, and meaningful. And, we need to ensure parents have the information and support they need to make the right decision for their kids.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adr

 

Can DeVos Assure Federal Protections for Special Ed. Students Using Vouchers?
Education Week analysis by columnist Andrew Ujifusa

If you listen to one top Democratic senator, Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has pledged to make sure schools participating in a proposed federally backed school choice program must follow federal special education law. But the issue isn’t necessarily so straightforward.
Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the ranking member of the Senate education committee, thinks DeVos made the answer pretty clear. On Tuesday, she asked DeVos if the $250 million school choice program in President Donald Trump’s proposed budget would require participating schools “to comply with IDEA.” (That’s a reference to the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, the federal law governing programs for special-needs students.) DeVos replied, “Absolutely.” Watch that exchange below:
An aide to Murray subsequently said this amounted to a commitment that “all students in schools receiving federal funds should be protected under our nation’s civil rights laws, including the full range of Title IX and IDEA.” In other words, Murray believes DeVos has pledged that schools using federally funded vouchers would have to follow IDEA.
But can DeVos make that promise and have it backed up by the law itself right now?
The short answer is no. As our colleague Christina Samuels wrote recently, “Federal law states that parents who choose to enroll their children in private schools do not receive the Individuals with Disabilities Act protections that are granted to public school students.” And right now, states as a general rule do not require private schools participating in state-run voucher programs to follow IDEA.
We don’t yet know the exact legal structure of the $250 million program proposed by the Trump administration-indeed, DeVos said there is no “specific proposal” under that line item in the spending blueprint. But if any federal voucher program is to require private schools to follow IDEA, that would require either a direct change to the law outside the budget process, or change to the language in a congressional appropriations bill funding the Education Department. In the latter scenario, the Trump administration could propose such language, but only Congress could adopt it.
And either proposition would face a very steep uphill climb in Congress. DeVos said during the hearing said that her department would not issue “decrees” on which students are or are not covered under civil rights laws without congressional and court decisions on those outstanding issues.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ad7

 

My transgender son is graduating from high school. But his fight isn’t over.
Washington Post op-ed by Deirdre Grimm, mother of Gavin Grimm, plaintiff in the case Gavin Grimm v. Gloucester County School Board.

We teach our children to be kind. We teach them to love and to live life to the fullest. We teach them countless things to help them become better people, because as parents we all want the best for our children. And we demand that these values be taught in our schools so that when our kids graduate, they are open, compassionate people who understand that we all bleed the same blood and that everyone deserves to be treated with equality, dignity and respect.
My son, Gavin, will graduate from high school on Saturday. But he did not get the opportunity to learn those values at school. Instead, he learned them despite his school board treating him with the opposite of those values.
By now, my son’s story has spread to communities all across this country, because he stood up for himself as a transgender boy who wanted only to fully participate in his high school. He fought a policy that singled him out by forcing him to use a restroom separate from his peers. That fight took him all the way to the Supreme Court. Along the way, he helped people learn about the importance of treating transgender people fairly and equally.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ad8

 

A lazy summer for teenagers: Why aren’t more of them working?
Washington Post commentary by columnist Jeffrey J. Selingo

As high schools across the country finish up their academic year and teenagers get ready for the summer, there is one thing many of them won’t be doing over the next few months: working at a job.
The number of teenagers who have some sort of job while in school has dropped from nearly 40 percent in 1991, when I graduated from high school, to less than 20 percent today, an all-time low since the United States started keeping track in 1948.
To be sure, some of that can be blamed on a lackluster youth job market, but many teenagers are unemployed by choice. In upper-middle-class and wealthy neighborhoods, in particular, they are too busy doing other things, like playing sports, studying, and following a full schedule of activities booked by their parents.
“Upper-middle class families and above have made the determination that college admissions officers devalue paid work and that if you’re not pursuing a hectic schedule of activities you’ll be less appealing to colleges,” said Ron Lieber, author of The Opposite of Spoiled: Raising Kids Who Are Grounded, Generous, and Smart About Money. “So now we have over-programmed children who are all the same.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/adh

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Most Students Are Not Naturally Interested in STEM, Teachers Say
Education Week

Most middle and high school students are not interested in science, math, and even space, teachers said in a new national poll.
The poll, commissioned by Lockheed Martin, an aerospace and defense contracting company, asked 1,000 U.S. middle and high school teachers about their views on student interest in science and math. Only 38 percent said the majority of their students seem naturally interested in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The sample is nationally representative, and the survey was conducted online from April 5-11.
Out of those four subjects, 69 percent of teachers said their students are most interested in technology. Forty-two percent said their students are most interested in science, 25 percent of teachers’ students are most interested in engineering, and just 14 percent of teachers said their students are most interested in math.
Fewer than half of teachers-41 percent-said their students are eager to learn about space-related topics like planets, the solar system, space travel, and space exploration milestones.
What does that mean for future space missions?
http://gousoe.uen.org/ad6

 

How Schools, Parents And Organizations Are Trying To Close The Achievement Gap
(Washington, DC) WAMU

According to the latest Pew Research data, college graduation rates are up for Americans in nearly every racial and ethnic group.
Last year, former President Barack Obama spoke about how crucial this is for the U.S. economy.
“By 2020, two out of three job openings will require some form of higher education,” he said during an event at Benjamin Banneker Academic High School in Washington, D.C. “Our public schools had been the envy of the world, but the world caught up. And we started getting outpaced when it came to math and science education. And African American and Latino students, in part because of the legacy of discrimination, too often lagged behind our white classmates – something called the achievement gap that, by one estimate, costs us hundreds of billions of dollars a year.”
The so-called achievement gap is pretty big. As of 2016, according to Pew, 55 percent of white 25- to 34-year-olds had attained at least an associate degree. African-American students? 35 percent.
But there is work underway throughout the country to do something about this achievement gap. And it’s happening in the classroom, in the community, and in the home.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adm (audio)

 

Federal education officials reject Alabama’s request to ditch ACT Aspire
Birmingham (AL) News

The Alabama state board of education learned Thursday their plan to drop the ACT Aspire has hit a road block. The U.S. Department of Education rejected Alabama superintendent Michael Sentance’s request to use different tests next spring.
Sentance and board members have expressed their dislike for the ACT Aspire in recent months and need the waiver in order to keep from having to renew the ACT Aspire contract for another year. The board must either renew or cancel the contract with ACT Aspire by July 1.
Sentance told board members he and other state education staffers held a phone conference last week with Acting Assistant Secretary of Education, Jason Botel, and other federal education officials to ask for permission to stop using the ACT Aspire.
Alabama’s students have performed poorly on the tests, with proficiency levels not topping 50 percent in reading since the tests were first given in the spring of 2014.
Instead, Sentance wanted to use a series of interim tests, given throughout the 2017-2018 school year, to measure student progress and growth while Alabama decided on a new annual test to use for federal accountability.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adp

 

DeVos is Questioned About Campaign to Influence Climate Change Education
Frontline

Four Democratic senators are sharply criticizing a conservative think tank’s efforts to bring climate change skepticism into the nation’s public schools as “industry funded” and “possibly fraudulent” and demanding to know whether federal education officials have been in contact with the group.
The Heartland Institute has been sending books, DVDs and pamphlets to science teachers across the country promoting its stance that climate change is caused by natural phenomena rather than human activities – a view rejected by nearly all climate scientists. Heartland’s campaign to influence how climate science is taught in public schools was first reported by FRONTLINE and The GroundTruth Project in March.
The Illinois-based non-profit vows to continue its efforts, saying it has already sent more than 300,000 packages to K-12 and college-level science teachers since the launch of the campaign earlier this year. Mailings have wrapped up for the summer break, according to Heartland spokesman Jim Lakely. He added, however, “This is not the end of Heartland’s efforts to bring balance to the climate debate in our schools, but just the beginning.”
In a letter sent to Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Wednesday, Sens. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.), Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), Edward Markey (D-Mass.) and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) – all of whom have been outspoken on climate change issues – described the campaign as an effort “to disseminate fossil-fuel industry talking points as curriculum for science teachers.”
The senators asked DeVos whether any Education Department officials have had contact with individuals associated with the Heartland Institute “on climate, science, or science education issues,” and whether any informational resources put out by the department have been created in collaboration with Heartland.
The senators also asked DeVos whether she was aware of any discussions between the White House staff and Heartland. In March, the group’s president and CEO, Joseph Bast, told FRONTLINE and GroundTruth, “We’re getting a lot of requests for expert opinion from the White House … That’s very new.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/adq

 

‘Run!’ Gunfire on a school playground still haunts the first graders who survived
Washington Post

TOWNVILLE, S.C. -Recess had finally started, so Ava Olsen picked up her chocolate cupcake, then headed outside toward the swings. And that’s when the 7-year-old saw the gun.
It was black and in the hand of someone the first-graders on the playground would later describe as a thin, towering figure with wispy blond hair and angry eyes. Dressed in dark clothes and a baseball cap, he had just driven up in a Dodge Ram, jumping out of the pickup as it rolled into the chain-link fence that surrounded the play area. It was 1:41 on a balmy, blue-sky afternoon in late September, and Ava’s class was just emerging from an open door directly in front of him to join the other kids already outside. At first, a few of them assumed he had come to help with something or say hello.
Then he pulled the trigger.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adf

 

School district considers policy change after teacher arrest
Elko (NV) Daily Free Press

ELKO – The Elko County School District is hoping to tighten up its regulations policing interactions between students and teachers in the wake of a teacher’s arrest on sex charges.
Tennille Whitaker is a fourth-grade teacher who was arrested Monday afternoon on charges of engaging in sexual conduct with two high school students at Wells Combined School.
Whitaker, 40, has since posted bail and is on paid administrative leave while the investigation continues.
Elko County School District Superintendent Jeff Zander thinks Whitaker’s arrest come as a result of violating the regulations the school district already has in place and did not think she exploited any kind of a loophole within the guidelines.
Even though it did not appear to be an issue in this case, Zander said he would like to take a look at the social media policy to ensure that teachers have clear guidelines to follow going forward.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ad9

 

Civil Rights Groups Take New Mexico to Court in Fight Over Equitable Education
Education Week

Two civil rights groups want a New Mexico judge to rule that the state’s education system is failing to meet its constitutional responsibilities for groups of students, including English-language learners, Native Americans, economically disadvantaged students, and students with disabilities.
A nine-week trial begins Monday-and lawyers for the plaintiffs say the case could have ramifications well beyond the state’s borders.That’s because the lawyers for the parents and school districts says the state not only underfunds public schools, but essentially ignores the state’s “longstanding bilingual and multicultural history.”
State District Judge Sarah Singleton consolidated two lawsuits filed by the Mexican-American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty that allege that New Mexico does not provide sufficient funding or enrichment opportunities to all students.
More than two-thirds of students in the state are Latino or Native American, and 16 percent of students are classified as English-learners.
Officials with Republican Gov. Susana Martinez’s administration have denied the allegations, saying more money is being spent on education in New Mexico than ever before.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adl

 

Lawsuit: Washington failing to teach special-ed students
Associated Press

SEATTLE- A lawsuit from the Washington chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union accuses the state of failing to ensure that students with behavioral disabilities get an education instead of just kicked out of school.
The complaint, filed Thursday in Thurston County Superior Court, says the state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction has a duty to ensure that all children receive a public education, including those who have behavioral problems related to conditions such as bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder or Asperger’s syndrome.
Instead, the lawsuit says, districts across the state suspend and expel special-education students at more than twice the rate of their peers – and further, school officials often send the children to “time-out” rooms or have their parents pick them up early, which results in their exclusion from an educational setting.
Special-education students make up 14 percent of the state’s students, but nearly 30 percent of suspended and expelled students, the ACLU said.
The lawsuit seeks class-action status on behalf of special-education students in the Yakima and Pasco school districts. The ACLU says those districts suspend or expel special-education students at especially high rates.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adi

 

DeVos, Philanthropist Heavyweights to Speak at Charter Schools Conference
Education Week

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos will be addressing the country’s largest gathering of charter school leaders next week at the National Public Charter Schools Conference in Washington.
More than 4,000 charter school leaders, educators, advocates, and policymakers are expected to attend the annual gathering that’s hosted by the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, the nation’s largest charter advocacy group.
According to a press release, DeVos will give prepared remarks on Tuesday morning followed by a Q&A session with a moderator and questions from the audience.

The lineup for this year’s conference includes a couple of other notable, philanthropic heavyweights, including Reed Hastings, the founder and CEO of Netflix, and Marc Sternberg, the education program director for the Walton Family Foundation.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adk

 

‘Night School’ Documentary Looks at Adults Seeking an Elusive H.S. Diploma
Education Week

Adult education programs, including programs for high school dropouts to earn a GED or diploma, are a relatively little-discussed part of the education landscape. But many K-12 districts operate such programs, and their classrooms are filled with students who have not given up hope.
Director Andrew Cohn captures this part of the education world movingly with his “Night School,” an 85-minute documentary showing people whose lives have been knocked off track, but who still hold hopes of getting an elusive high school diploma. The film debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2016, but opens a limited theatrical release on Friday at the IFC Center in New York City.
Cohn and his crew spent the better part of a year in Indianapolis to follow three adults who attend the Excel Center, a tuition-free program for dropouts operated by Goodwill Education Initiatives, part of Goodwill of Central and Southern Indiana.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adj

 

The Best And Worst Paying Education Jobs In The U.S., 2017
Forbes

You may be surprised to know that there are quite a few positions in the teaching world that provide very healthy salaries. (image credit: Shutterstock)
If you tell your friends and family that you are contemplating a career in education, they might think to themselves – or say out loud – that such an endeavor might not bring about fabulous wealth.
In general, they would be right – there are other industries that offer many roles with substantially higher wages. But you may be surprised to know that there are quite a few positions in the teaching world that provide very healthy salaries. We looked at the most recent Occupational Employment and Wages data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and discovered some jobs that pay well – and those that paid not so well.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ado

 

Why Adolescence Lasts Forever
A new book explores the dynamics of popularity, and the ways our high-school selves stay with us far beyond the teenage years.
Atlantic

In August of 2001, Mitch Prinstein, a psychology professor who had just been hired at Yale University, offered his first class at the school: a course he had developed about popularity among children and adolescents. When Prinstein arrived at the small classroom the school had assigned him in the center of campus, he was greeted with a crowd outside the lecture hall-one so large that he figured there’d been a fire-drill-mandated building evacuation. It took him a moment to realize that there was no fire; the students were all there for his class. By the time the enrollment for the course was official, 550 students-a tenth of the school’s undergraduate population-had signed up to learn about that thing that is, variously, an aspiration and a scourge and a mystery: popularity.
Was the class size simply the result of the nerdy and the nerd-adjacent wanting to learn more about the thing that had eluded them in their younger years? Not really, Prinstein argues. Their interest in popularity was more anthropological than that. The students “told me that although they had long since departed the playground and the school cafeteria, they never left the world where popularity matters,” Prinstein writes in his new book on that subject, Popular: The Power of Likability in a Status-Obsessed World. The undergrads, in their jobs and internships, had already seen the social dynamics of adolescence affecting people’s interactions in board rooms, in operating rooms, in the world. They saw popularity influencing the workings of juries. And of sports teams. Congressional interns saw popularity playing out in the way laws were written and the American government was run.
The phenomenon that was supposed to be nowhere-popularity as another childish thing, to be given up at the onset of adulthood-was, it turned out, everywhere. “In a very real manner,” Prinstein writes, “our experiences with popularity are always occupying our minds.” He adds: “We never really left high school at all.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/adn

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

June 20:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

June 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

July 13:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 14:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

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