Education News Roundup: June 12, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Poll finds Utahns think the Our Schools Now initiative will make it to the ballot. After that …?
http://gousoe.uen.org/adF (UP)

Utah begins work on competency-based education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adU (LHJ)

Utah State Board of Education will audit school fees.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adH (DN)

The Board is also looking at a coaching registry.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adP (DN)

New York Times profiles Secretary DeVos.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adE (NYT)

Our Schools Now philosophy appears to be spreading to Arizona.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adI (Arizona Republic)

Trial opening today looks at New Mexico’s school system.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adJ (Albuquerque Journal)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/ae4 (AP)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

‘Political Insiders’ think ‘Our Schools Now’ will get on the 2018 ballot but will have difficulty passing

Ballot Initiative Moves Forward To Secure More Money For Utah Schools

State Representative: Revamped Tax Increase Initiative Would Hurt Utah Families, Economy

Utah PTA unanimously votes to support our schools now

Local school districts, charter school accepted to pilot program

School fees audit ordered amid reports of shaming, billing low-income kids

Can high school coach registry be effective tool to protect kids from predators?

Utah charter school accused of dysfunction, employee misconduct is off probation
Franklin Discovery » School officials continue to address concerns over academic dysfunction, student supervision.

Refugees in Utah celebrate graduation years after escaping violence at home
Teens transplanted amid war and violence make their own way and earn their diplomas.

Maple Mountain SkillsUSA welding students raise money for fifth trip to nationals

Utah Military Academy cadets train at Camp Williams

17 educators recognized and rewarded for excellence in teaching

School district holds public hearing on proposed $211 million budget

Mesquite Stake Seminary celebrates 2017 graduation

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Utah public schools are worth increased investment

Real teacher of the year material here…not…

Effect of raising teacher pay

Property tax exemption?

Trump’s education cuts aren’t ‘devastating,’ they’re smart

Ending the Curse of Remedial Math

Schools don’t prepare children for life. Here’s the education they really need
>From computer coding to toilet unblocking, we need well-rounded citizens, not rote-taught robots – and what you learn shouldn’t depend on where you live

NATION

To Understand Betsy DeVos’s Educational Views, View Her Education

Arizona business leaders want big tax increase for teacher salaries, education

NM’s school system ‘goes on trial’

Wall teen’s Trump T-shirt censored in yearbook

Success Academy Wins Broad Prize for Charter Schools

Premature babies often catch up to peers in school: study

A Teacher’s Viral Video Explains Why Teaching Is Tiring

 

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UTAH NEWS
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‘Political Insiders’ think ‘Our Schools Now’ will get on the 2018 ballot but will have difficulty passing

The “Our Schools Now” effort to put a sales and income tax hike to better fund Utah’s schools on the 2018 ballot got underway this week. Our “Political Insiders” think they’ll get enough signatures to secure a ballot spot, but they mostly say voters will reject the measure.
The OSN ballot initiative seeks to gradually phase in a 0.5% increase in both the state sales and income tax rate over 3 years. That should generate an extra $750 million per year for Utah’s school system annually. Utah currently spends the least per student in the nation.
A majority of our “Political Insiders” say OSN should be able to gather the 120,000 signatures it will take to get on the ballot. 84% of the Republicans on our panel, 87% of the Democrats and 58% of our readers think OSN will get enough signatures.
However, most of the Republicans and readers who responded to our survey say the OSN initiative is doomed to failure at the ballot box.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adF (UP)

 

Ballot Initiative Moves Forward To Secure More Money For Utah Schools

Teacher salaries have been on the rise throughout northern Utah, including Park City where new teachers will now be paid over $50,000 a year. That’s the highest entry level teacher salary in the state. On top of this shift a new ballot initiative called Our Schools Now aims to get even more money into Utah’s schools.
Bob Marquadt, one of the organizers for Our Schools Now, says it’s encouraging to see teacher salaries increasing but not to forget that these changes have only impacted some of Utah’s schools.
Marquadt says Utah is now experiencing a big variance where some teachers are making $30,000 and others, like those teaching in Park City, are making as much as $20,000 more starting out.
Our Schools Now would increase the flow of money to all schools statewide by raising both sales and income tax by 0.5 percent. This change would be phased in over three years, resulting in an additional $700 million annually.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adZ (KUER)

 

State Representative: Revamped Tax Increase Initiative Would Hurt Utah Families, Economy

Utah business and education leaders launched a new ballot initiative for the 2018 mid-term elections on Tuesday.
Revamping their effort following the 2017 General Session, Our Schools Now seeks to increase taxes to fund public education.
“Student’s deserve exceptional teachers, equitable opportunities, and the resources necessary to ensure success,” said Heidi Matthews, president of the Utah Education Association, who spoke at the announcement. She and other supporters — including Zions Bank CEO Scott Anderson — are proposing tax increases to fund Utah public education.
“Our Schools Now is an essential first step toward assuring a permanent, long-term funding solution for education in Utah,” she said. “Local school boards, districts, and communities are recognizing that investing [in] those who stand at the front of our classrooms is essential for the success of their students, and they are willing to pay for it.”
If the proposal receives enough signatures to make the ballot and is then passed by voters, it would raise Utah’s sales tax by 0.5 percent. The state income tax would also rise by 0.5 percent over 4 years, with both raises resulting in $700 million for education each year.
Rep. McCay, who’s serving on the Education Interim Committee, worries that the tax could negatively impact struggling families and hurt the state’s economy.
“We’ve got an economy that is growing quickly and one of the ways you can limit growth is to increase a tax — creates disincentives for performance, for investment in the state to increase jobs,” he said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ae9 (UPR)

 

Utah PTA unanimously votes to support our schools now

The Utah Parent Teacher Association Board of Directors unanimously endorsed the Our Schools Now Teacher and Student Success Act, the largest proposed investment increase for public education in Utah’s history.
The initiative – filed with the Lt. Governor’s Office – generates $700 million for Utah’s public education system, reversing 20 years of tax cuts at the expense of teachers and students.
PTA President Dawn Davies made the following statement following the Board’s decision:
http://gousoe.uen.org/aea (Emery County Progress)

 

Local school districts, charter school accepted to pilot program

Both local school districts and a charter school will have the opportunity this coming school year to visit schools across the country that use competency-based education in a new pilot program from the Utah State Board of Education.
Cache County School District, Logan City School District and Edith Bowen Laboratory School are among the six Utah school districts and seven charter schools joining the exploratory program.
Sarah Young, digital teaching and learning coordinator for the Utah State Board of Education, said competency-based education is the idea that students advance once they have demonstrated skills and understanding of a subject.
“It is a very different model than the current school model that we run, which is much more based on taking specific courses,” Young said.
Authorized in the 2016 Utah Legislature, the pilot program is now starting its first year and will not include implementation yet.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adU (LHJ)

 

School fees audit ordered amid reports of shaming, billing low-income kids

SALT LAKE CITY – Amid reports of bills being sent to children who have school fee waivers, even the shaming of children on fee waivers, the State School Board has authorized an audit of school fees statewide.
The audit will be conducted by the Utah State Board of Education’s independent auditors and focus on educational “equity and access issues,” as well as review how fees are established and waiver procedures. The audit will not address the dollar amount of the fees, which are set by local boards of education.
School fees are not assessed in public elementary schools up to grade six. However, if a sixth grade is part of a middle school, fees can be assessed. Fees can be assessed in grades seven through 12.
Fee waiver eligibility is based on income. If a household qualifies, fees can be waived for school registration, textbooks, textbook and equipment deposits, school supplies, activity cards, extracurricular activities and school lockers; lab and shop fees; gym and towel fees; costs for uniforms and accessories; field trips and assembly fees; costs for class or team trips; and costs of musical instruments used in school classes or activities, according to the State School Board’s website.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adH (DN)

 

Can high school coach registry be effective tool to protect kids from predators?

SALT LAKE CITY – It’s unlikely a Utah high school coach who is a licensed school teacher can readily move to another assignment if a hearing process substantiates they had inappropriate contact with a student.
But what about coaches – paid and volunteer – who fall outside that system?
The State School Board is wrestling with that question as it considers a proposed administrative rule that would in some way track the employment of coaches and volunteers who work with students in interscholastic activities but are not licensed educators.
Some members of the Utah State Board of Education say the rule change would enhance student safety, but others argue that a registry or database that would be made available to schools statewide could unfairly impugn coaches’ reputations unless there is a hearing process for them to challenge allegations of wrongdoing.
After debating the rule in a recent meeting, the State School Board will likely take up the matter again when it meets on July 14.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adP (DN)

 

Utah charter school accused of dysfunction, employee misconduct is off probation
Franklin Discovery » School officials continue to address concerns over academic dysfunction, student supervision.

Vineyard’s Franklin Discovery Academy will continue operating after the charter school was lifted from probation and placed on warning status Thursday.
The move by the State Charter School board comes four months after allegations surfaced that a student had been targeted for a sexual relationship by a former employee and the firing of an administrator for allegedly failing to act on those claims.
Utah Board of Education staff also visited the school and reported a dysfunctional academic environment in which students were left unsupervised, instructional time was minimal and safety hazards were prevalent.
School administrators disputed the descriptions by board staff, while acknowledging the inappropriate actions of a former employee and lapses in personnel management.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adM (SLT)

 

Refugees in Utah celebrate graduation years after escaping violence at home
Teens transplanted amid war and violence make their own way and earn their diplomas.

For the first 16 years of Eric Mugisha’s life, he lived in a refugee camp in Rwanda.
Mugisha was born there, after his parents and grandparents fled their home country of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in wake of mass genocide and political unrest. Now, he’s graduating from high school in Utah and has dreams of furthering his education and getting a good job.
As he joked and played with friends at Salt Lake City’s Jordan Park on Friday night, he looked like a typical American teenager, donning a shimmering gold hat with confidence. The gathering was put on by Catholic Community Services of Utah to honor Mugisha and 13 other high school graduates, along with one person graduating with an associate degree – all of them refugees living in foster homes around the state.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adL (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/adO (DN)

 

Maple Mountain SkillsUSA welding students raise money for fifth trip to nationals

For the fifth year in a row, students from Maple Mountain High School’s SkillsUSA club will be competing in the national welding fabrication competition.
But in order to fund the trip, the students spent their Saturday building and welding for members of the community at their fifth annual Fix-It Saturday.
“We do repair stuff, but we also if people get ahold of us earlier we will build stuff for them,” Maple Mountain High School teacher Jared Massic said. “So we’ve done benches or different yard art things.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/adR (PDH)

 

Utah Military Academy cadets train at Camp Williams

The cadets were told they needed to pack up their sleeping gear by 7 a.m. As a group of teens waking up early on a summer morning, there were a few stragglers slugging along.
And then the sprinklers went off.
The unplanned shower was an unintended consequence for tardiness, and another way the Utah Military Academy taught cadets accountability over a week of exercises at Camp Williams in Lehi.
“We are giving them life skills even if they never put a uniform on,” said Senior Master Sgt. Cindy Seipert, part of the academy’s Ranger staff support at its Riverdale campus.
Cadets were there from both the academy’s Riverdale and Utah County campuses. The cadets are a part of a special group at the school and are not affiliated with the Army Rangers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adT (PDH)

 

17 educators recognized and rewarded for excellence in teaching

Thousands of dollars were handed out to teachers in the Cache County School District over the past few months as a result of the Cache Education Foundation’s Hats Off awards. According to the foundation, outstanding educators who go above and beyond the usual efforts of a teacher can receive a cash award to recognize them for their efforts.
Teacher nominations for these awards are submitted by students, parents, community members, teachers, administrators, PTA and school community councils. This year, 14 such awards were handed out throughout the district.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adV (CVD)

 

School district holds public hearing on proposed $211 million budget

ST. GEORGE – The Washington County School District Board of Education will conduct a public hearing seeking public input on the adoption of its final budget of the 2016-2017 fiscal year and the proposed budget for the 2017-2018 fiscal year. The public hearing will take place during the regular meeting of the board Tuesday at 4 p.m. in the Washington County School District office, 121 W. Tabernacle St., St. George.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adX (SGN)

 

Mesquite Stake Seminary celebrates 2017 graduation

The Mesquite Nevada Stake Seminary of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints celebrated 164 students on June 4, according to a news release submitted by Mesquite LDS Stake Public Affairs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adW (SGS)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Utah public schools are worth increased investment
Deseret News op-ed by Patricia Jones, CEO of the Women’s Leadership Institute

“If you think education is expensive, try ignorance.” – Andy McIntyre
One of the biggest mistakes that marketers make is focusing solely on features of a product or service without effectively communicating the benefits of the product. In other words, they advertise the “what” and forget the “why this matters” part of the equation. In fact, most of us make purchase decisions based on perceived benefits of one or more of the features. How often do you pay more for a product because of some sort of added value? For example, when you buy a car, do you upgrade in order to receive greater reliability? More room? Leather seats? Gas economy? In making the decision, consumers weigh whether upgrading is worth the additional investment.
Utah has struggled for decades to address the features of public education – more technology for example – without adequately explaining the benefits of investing in our kids. Recently, the Our Schools Now campaign began the process to collect signatures and finally allow Utah voters to decide whether our public schools are worth increased investment. But that’s just a feature. Let’s play the “What if .” scenario, with the intention of inspiring readers to make the connection between more funding and net benefits.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adG

 

Real teacher of the year material here…not…
KNRS commentary by columnist Rod Arquette

So what is like the last thing you should do in front of school children if you’re a teacher on a field trip? I mean the last thing you should do that WON’T put you under police investigation. Especially when you’re taking a group of kids to DC to see the capital building. Probably encourage profanity and lewd behavior right?
Well…this teacher did it. And what’s more, he bragged about the fact he was planning on doing so to his students, then encouraged them to visit hi Facebook page to see the proof. I mean…how STUPID do you have to be to think in this day and age there wouldn’t be an instant backlash over it? Suffice to say the picture did not last long on his profile, and has since been taken down.
Free speech and all, I get that. But, and admittedly I’m making an assumption he’s a leftist here, for people who complain about the toxicity and divisiveness plaguing our country they sure seem to have zero interest in doing anything to stop it. In fact it’s this sort of behavior that continues to perpetuate these riots and so forth.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ae0

 

Effect of raising teacher pay
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Randy Epperson

I’m now 70 and last year got a $2-a-month increase on my monthly Social Security check that I worked and contributed to for 50 years.
I didn’t have children and now I see that the teacher salary increase of roughly $7,000 per year is going through that will come up with a $400-plus-per-year increase in my taxes.
Where will I get that money?
http://gousoe.uen.org/adN

 

Property tax exemption?
Deseret News letter from Brian Cole

In regards to the debate over whether taxes should be raised for public schools, I would propose an alternative solution since we all agree class sizes in public schools are too large. My solution is for parents who choose to send their children to nonpublic schools, instead of giving them school vouchers, have their property taxes exempt from funding public schools since by doing this they help reduce the size of public school class sizes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adQ

 

Trump’s education cuts aren’t ‘devastating,’ they’re smart
Los Angeles Times op-ed by William M. Evers, a research fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, and Vicki E. Alger, research fellow at the Independent Institute

It’s the end of the world as we know it – at least that’s what some people would have us believe about President Trump’s education budget.
It’s “a devastating blow to the country’s public education system,” according to National School Boards Assn. CEO Thomas Gentzel. More like a “wrecking ball,” says Lily Eskelsen García, president of the National Education Assn. teachers’ union. No, it’s a veritable “assault on the American Dream,” insists John B. King Jr., former Obama administration secretary of education.
Such hyperbole is reminiscent of the early 1980s, when President Reagan’s opponents battled his administration’s education cuts, and it’s about as inaccurate today as it was back then.
Trump wants to reduce the U.S. Department of Education’s discretionary budget by $9.2 billion, from $68.3 billion to $59.1 billion. Close to two-thirds of that reduction (63%) comes from eliminating programs that are duplicative or just don’t work.
The administration is proposing a 10% cut in TRIO programs and a cut of almost a third in GEAR UP programs. GEAR UP and TRIO (which despite the name consists of nine programs) are supposed to help at-risk students who hope to go to college, but who might not make it.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ae7

 

Ending the Curse of Remedial Math
New York Times op-ed by David L. Kirp, professor of public policy at the University of California, Berkeley

Can you simplify this square root?” Erica Fells asks her class, and hands wave in the air. All but one of the students believe that it’s impossible to do so. The dissenter, Leslie Alcantara, lays out her argument. “What do the rest of you think of Leslie’s reasoning?” Ms. Fells asks, and after some back­and­forth, they agree – she’s correct.
These students have been admitted to one of the City University of New York’s community colleges. They didn’t score high enough on CUNY’s math, reading and writing tests to take the college­credit courses they must pass to earn an associate degree, so they were steered into a catch­up program called CUNY Start. Its track record shows that, with good teaching and I­have­your­back counseling, youths who otherwise would likely drop out have a solid shot at making it.
The strategy is working: More than half the students who complete the program are ready for college in just one semester, something that’s almost impossible with regular remedial courses.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ae1

 

Schools don’t prepare children for life. Here’s the education they really need
>From computer coding to toilet unblocking, we need well-rounded citizens, not rote-taught robots – and what you learn shouldn’t depend on where you live
(Manchester) Guardian commentary by columnist Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett

It’s only after you have left school and, in adulthood, gained a bit of distance, that you can be fully aware of the gaps in your education. History is a prime example. A group of British people together around a pub table and can probably weave together some kind of cohesive narrative across the centuries. In isolation, however, what you discover is that one person did the Romans, another the second world war, and a third spent two years on medieval crop rotation. Meaning that as a school leaver, you’ll have a vague idea about how it all fits together, but whole epochs remain shrouded in mystery.
That’s not to say that we should return to rote learning in the kind of system envisaged by Michael Gove. An ability to memorise dates informs little about the intellectual potential of any pupil. It just tells us that they are good at retaining information. But what the history problem does illustrate is that what you learn at school is entirely dependent on where you end up, how good your teachers are, which exam board they are using, and whether your school is well funded or deprived and stretched for resources.
In an ideal world the education system would be radically overhauled, to deliver a truly national curriculum; where a child in one county has as much right to learn Spanish as a child in another. Options would not be closed off simply because of the catchment area. Furthermore an interest in, say, drama, would not preclude a pupil from also studying geography. A greater portfolio of core subjects would not only be available, but would also prevent pupils from being forced to narrow down their options at an age when they don’t yet know who they really are.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ae8

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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To Understand Betsy DeVos’s Educational Views, View Her Education
New York Times

HOLLAND, Mich. – The students formed a circle around the Rev. Ray Vanderlaan, who draped himself in a Jewish ceremonial prayer shawl to cap his final lesson to graduating seniors in his discipleship seminar at Holland Christian High chool.
“We’re sending you out into a broken world, in part because of my generation,” the minister told the students. Referring to God, he exhorted them to “extend his kingdom.”
Mr. Vanderlaan could not have missed his lesson’s echoes of Holland Christian’s most famous graduate, Betsy DeVos, who proclaimed in an audio recording that surfaced in December that her education advocacy would “advance God’s kingdom.” Last month, in her first commencement address as education secretary, Ms. DeVos again reflected her own education when she told graduates at Bethune­Cookman University in Daytona Beach, Fla., that “my generation hasn’t done a great job when it comes to dealing with one another in grace.”
She continued, “You have an opportunity to do better.”
Holland Christian is one of several western Michigan nonpublic schools that have helped shape Ms. DeVos’s views of elementary and secondary education, and that her critics fear she will draw from to upend the nation’s public schools. The private Christian school that she attended, another that she sent her children to and a hardscrabble private religious school that she has long supported have dominated her time, money and attention.
Public neighborhood schools – the vast majority of schools in this country – were hardly present in the billionaire’s childhood or adult life.
Critics say this lopsided exposure fueled Ms. DeVos’s staunch support of privately run, publicly funded charter schools and voucher programs that allow families to take tax dollars from the public education system to private schools.
In an interview, Ms. DeVos disagreed, saying the schools in which she has personal investment reflect only an agenda of empowering parents with a right that she was afforded by privilege: choice.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adE

 

Arizona business leaders want big tax increase for teacher salaries, education
(Phoenix) Arizona Republic

Some of Arizona’s most influential business leaders have a plan to significantly boost education funding, and they’re not waiting for Gov. Doug Ducey and the Legislature to make it happen.
This week, they began a public campaign to convince fellow business leaders to raise the funds to put an expansion of Proposition 301 on the ballot – and sooner rather than later, although they haven’t disclosed exactly when they’d like to see it on the ballot.
They’re pushing to nearly triple the current 0.6 cent education sales tax to 1.5 cents, permanently. That’s significantly higher than has been discussed by other groups so far, and would mean an additional $900 million a year for teachers and schools.
The additional revenue would go toward areas Ducey prioritized this year – teacher salaries, full-day kindergarten, school infrastructure, teacher training and workforce development.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adI

 

NM’s school system ‘goes on trial’
Albuquerque (NM) Journal

A landmark case that alleges New Mexico’s schools are not receiving sufficient state funding will go to trial Monday.
The lawsuit – a consolidation of two similar cases, Yazzie v. New Mexico and Martinez v. New Mexico – argues that a lack of adequate funding is particularly harmful to minority and low-income children, denying them their fundamental right to a quality education as outlined in the New Mexico Constitution.
“The public education system in New Mexico is literally on trial,” said Marisa Bono, Southwest regional counsel for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund, a Los Angeles-based civil rights organization that filed Martinez v. New Mexico on behalf of families from seven school districts.
New Mexico has never seen a case of this kind, though MALDEF has filed similar lawsuits in Colorado and Texas.
Bono said the expected nine-week trial in Santa Fe’s 1st Judicial District Court will have a broad scope: More than 130 depositions were taken and over a million pages of documents have been exchanged.
Twenty-three of the state’s 89 school districts will be reviewed in the trial presentation, which will focus on academic outcomes, particularly among English language learners, low-income and Native American students. Those groups are consistently behind their peers on measures like graduation rates and standardized test scores.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adJ

http://gousoe.uen.org/ae4 (AP)

 

Wall teen’s Trump T-shirt censored in yearbook
Asbury Park (NJ) Press

WALL – Grant Berardo couldn’t vote for Donald Trump last year, but the Wall Township High School junior certainly could wear a T-shirt with his name on it.
Or so he thought.
With his parents’ permission, Grant took his school pictures wearing a navy blue Trump campaign shirt emblazoned with the slogan “Make America Great Again.”
But when Grant, 17, flipped to the yearbook page with his picture, he was shocked: Instead of the campaign shirt he wore that day, he was shown in a nondescript black T-shirt.
“It was Photoshopped” to remove the Trump message, Grant said in an interview.
http://gousoe.uen.org/adK

 

Success Academy Wins Broad Prize for Charter Schools
Education Week

Success Academy, New York City’s booming-and at times controversial-network of charter schools, has been awarded the charter sector’s most prestigious prize.
Success Academy was selected over networks based in Colorado and Texas for the sixth annual Broad Prize for Public Charter Schools, which recognizes nonprofit charter networks that are aggressively closing academic achievement gaps between low-income students and their wealthier peers.
But the network, the largest in the city with 41 schools and 14,000 students, has also been at the center of heated debate over special education and discipline in charter schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ae5

 

Premature babies often catch up to peers in school: study
Reuters

A study following more than 1.3 million premature babies born in Florida found that two-thirds of those born at only 23 or 24 weeks were ready for kindergarten on time, and almost 2 percent of those infants later achieved gifted status in school.
Such very prematurely born babies did score lower on standardized tests than full-term infants, but as the length of pregnancy increased, the differences in test scores became negligible, according to the study, conducted by Northwestern University and published on Monday in JAMA Pediatrics medical journal.
“What excites me about this study is that it changes the focus for the clinician and families at the bedside from just focusing on the medical outcomes of the child to what the future educational outcomes might be for a child born early,” Craig Garfield, the first author of the study and an associate professor of pediatrics and medial social sciences at Northwestern Medicine, said in a statement.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ae2

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/ae3 (JAMA Pediatrics) $

 

A Teacher’s Viral Video Explains Why Teaching Is Tiring
Education Week

Why are teachers so tired at the end of the school year? Maybe it’s because they spent the last nine months juggling a million things while still shaping the lives and minds of the students in their care.
In a video that has gone viral, high school English teacher Trevor Muir shares the funny and serious ways that teaching is exhausting. He posted it to his Facebook page, The Epic Classroom, where it has received over 18 million views.
Grading papers, “composing and giving an original 20-minute-long, memorized speech in front of 30 people every day, 180 days out of the year,” always having to be “on,” navigating relationships with parents, seeing politicians cut education funding, prepping students for tests, having to stand all day-all that and more is tiring, Muir writes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ae6

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

June 20:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

June 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

Government Operations Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 450 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002648.htm

Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Interim Committee meeting
1:15 p.m., 30 House Building
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002679.htm

Revenue and Taxation Interim Committee
1:15 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002691.htm

July 13:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 14:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

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