Education News Roundup: June 13, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Utah improves in most categories in this year’s Kids Count report.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aei (KUER)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aej (SLT)
or copies of the reports
National
http://gousoe.uen.org/aek (Annie E. Casey Foundation)
Utah
http://gousoe.uen.org/ael (Annie E. Casey Foundation)

Trib follows up on the audit of school fees.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeh (SLT)

High school artists will be part of the Utah Arts Festival this year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeC (Utah Review)
or more information
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeD (Salt Lake City Library)

Secretary DeVos offers charter schools some advice.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aen (The 74)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aez (USN&WR)
or a copy of Secretary DeVos’ speech
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeu (ED)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Two New Reports Rank Well-Being Of Utah Kids

Utah Board of Education orders review of school fees amid complaints of high costs, student shaming
Complaints over high costs and allegations of shaming of low-income students prompt scrutiny.

Backstage at The Utah Arts Festival 2017: Traveling exhibition of some of Utah’s finest works by high school artists signals new generation of creative professionals

Park City High School graduates say bonds will linger
Class of 2017 will be remembered for achievement, students say

VVHS graduation: ‘Go out and do amazing things’

National FFA Organization Names 2017 New Century Farmers

Summer Food Program provides free lunch for local children

Merrill Osmond brings pioneer pageant, fireworks show to St. George

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Utah needs a centrist political party

The untapped lessons hidden in computer games

PBS Runs A Three-Hour Series Glorifying The DeVos Education Agenda
Funded by conservative foundations devoted to privatization, this program is the definition of paid propaganda.

NATION

DeVos Urges Charter Advocates to Embrace Wider View of School Choice, Warns Them Not to Become ‘The Man’
Criticism that DeVos won’t protect students’ civil rights “hurtful,” inaccurate, she says

Charter schools see opportunity with Republicans in power: lobbying group

Who’s helping and who’s hurting? New national study looks at how charter networks measure up, from KIPP to K12

Why for-profit charter schools are going out of style with some education reform leaders

Deaf Kids with Cochlear Implants Do Better Without Sign Language
Not having learned sign language was tied to improved language, speaking, reading scores

Trump to tout apprenticeships as way to fill jobs gap

Trump’s Labor secretary pans Rahm Emanuel’s graduation plan

Grant Spotlight: $20 Million for PK-12 STEM Education

Coach, school district square off in federal court

Sandy Hook group dumps Megyn Kelly as event host

Richard Dawkins: religious education is crucial for British schoolchildren

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Two New Reports Rank Well-Being Of Utah Kids

Two new reports out yesterday show that Utah ranks seventh in the nation for child well-being. But that number alone doesn’t tell the full story.
The reports are part of the Kids Count project, produced at the national level by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which also funded a state data book produced by Voices for Utah Children.
They examine childhood health, economic well-being, education, and family criteria like teen pregnancy and poverty rates.
In many ways Utah is doing well. The state improved in 12 out of 16 indicators of child well-being. But Terry Haven, the Deputy Director of Voices for Utah Children, says it’s important to look closely at local level data to get a sense of what’s happening with Utah’s kids.
“When you look at Morgan County, it’s only 5.3 percent poverty – child poverty. But when you look at San Juan, it’s 32 percent,” Haven says.
The data shows that youth suicide has risen dramatically in recent years. It also shows steady improvements in the number of kids who have health coverage in the state.
Tess Davis analyzes education at Voices for Utah Children. She says the gains that appear in these data books are the result of laws and policies implemented over the past several years. That’s important to keep that in mind with decisions we make now.
“I think you’ll see our education numbers go up in future years reports because of the increased investment in this past legislative session,” Davis says.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aei (KUER)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aej (SLT)

Copies of the reports
National
http://gousoe.uen.org/aek (Annie E. Casey Foundation)

Utah
http://gousoe.uen.org/ael (Annie E. Casey Foundation)

 

Utah Board of Education orders review of school fees amid complaints of high costs, student shaming
Complaints over high costs and allegations of shaming of low-income students prompt scrutiny.

State school board members have voted to launch an audit of the fees Utah public schools collect from students.
During their June 2 meeting, board members discussed reports made by staff and through a hotline regarding costly fees for activities and course materials, inconsistent application of fee waivers for low-income families, and allegations of students being singled out or otherwise humiliated for failing to pay fees or getting waivers.
The board voted unanimously in favor of an audit, which is intended to review school district and charter school compliance with state law and school board policies.
“Having the board prioritize it in a meeting means it’s pretty urgent,” said Debbie Davis, the board’s internal audit director. “It’s high-priority.”
The audit coincides with the scheduled five-year review of school board policies on fee collection. School districts and charter schools are able to set their own price levels and levy fees for students in grades seven or higher.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeh (SLT)

 

Backstage at The Utah Arts Festival 2017: Traveling exhibition of some of Utah’s finest works by high school artists signals new generation of creative professionals

For Rebekah Campbell, a Provo High School student, her art work titled Transend, done in acrylic on paper, signified her decision at the end of her sophomore year to pursue art in college and as a career. Although she said it was a difficult decision to make, Campbell wanted to convey the contentment she experienced in deciding on her life’s work.
“I wanted to capture this contentment in this self-portrait, so I chose subdued jade-ish hues for my background colors,” she explains. “I included the hummingbird because they’ve always seemed to have an extraordinary sense of balance about them, and although I definitely don’t right now, I want to be able to have that.”
Campbell’s work is one of 50 art pieces created by Utah high school students that is being featured in the traveling exhibition representing the 2016 and 2017 Utah All-State High School Art Show, which champions the work of juniors and seniors which are selected by a professional jury.
The exhibit, free and open to the public, will be unveiled on the opening day pf the Utah Arts Festival (June 22) in The Gallery at Library Square on the fourth floor of The City Library. A reception will be held for the artists and the public that day at 6 p.m.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeC (Utah Review)

More information
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeD (Salt Lake City Library)

 

Park City High School graduates say bonds will linger
Class of 2017 will be remembered for achievement, students say

Students in the Park City High School Class of 2017 toss their graduation caps into the air on Dozier Field following the commencement ceremony’s recessional Friday afternoon. Nearly 400 seniors graduated.
On the final day of class, as they donned red, black and white one last time as Park City High School students, the Class of 2017 reflected on the people and the place that had shaped them.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeE (PR)

 

VVHS graduation: ‘Go out and do amazing things’

http://gousoe.uen.org/aet (SGS)

 

National FFA Organization Names 2017 New Century Farmers

INDIANAPOLIS – The National FFA Organization has selected 50 outstanding young people to participate in the 2017 New Century Farmer conference. This exclusive, highly competitive program develops young men and women committed to pursuing a career in production agriculture.
Participants will take part in an intensive seminar July 16-22 in Johnstown, Iowa. They will learn from each other and industry experts during a series of workshops and sessions. Topics will include the global marketplace, farm financing, demographic trends and risk management. New Century Farmers will hear from motivating and informative keynote speakers who will educate them on the risks and rewards involved with production agriculture. In addition to classroom learning, students will experience the latest developments in agricultural technology.

The 2017 New Century Farmers are:
… McKinzie Smith of Snowville, Utah;
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeL (Fairfield [MT] Sun Times)

 

Summer Food Program provides free lunch for local children

The Utah State Board of Education’s Summer Food Program will benefit thousands of Cache Valley schoolchildren during the 2017 summer recess. Free lunchtime meals are available at 11 locations in Cache and Box Elder counties, serving children ages 18 and under from early June through late July or early August, depending on location. Free lunch is also being served in Preston, Idaho. The Summer Food Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).
http://gousoe.uen.org/aes (CVD)

 

Merrill Osmond brings pioneer pageant, fireworks show to St. George

ST. GEORGE – A free Pioneer Day celebration by entertainment legend Merrill Osmond of The Osmond Brothers will feature a pioneer-themed pageant and fireworks show July 24 at the Legend Solar Stadium in St. George.
The newly dubbed “Pioneer Legacy & Firework Celebration” previously debuted in West Jordan in 2012. The show, produced in cooperation with Days of ’47 Dixie, has been updated considerably for its Southern Utah debut, celebrating the pioneers who settled Utah’s Dixie, as well as the contributions of several other cultures.

More than 150 youth from Vista Charter School represent the production’s main actors. Wagons, handcarts, tepees, the Flying Rocket Man, local entertainment, special guests and a massive firework display highlight the performance.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeF (SGN)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Utah needs a centrist political party
(Provo) Daily Herald op-ed by Richard Davis, chair of the newly formed United Utah Party

A new party has formed in Utah. It isn’t like the Constitution Party, the Libertarian Party, or the Green Party. Those are ideologically fringe parties.
This party – the United Utah Party – is a middle party that appeals to the center of Utah politics and not its extremes.
Not only are these smaller parties extreme, but so are the two major parties. Extremes on both ends – from the Tea Party on the Republican side to the Bernie Sanders movement on the Democratic side – have come to dominate the two major parties. The search for common ground has been lost, and civility has been discarded in pursuit of passionate causes.

We want to recruit, support and vote for legislators who will not become extreme by their association with the current party caucuses in the state Legislature. We oppose the closed caucuses the Republican majority uses to make policy. But unlike the Democrats we will elect legislators who will work to represent voters across the state rather than ignore or criticize them.
For example, we want our legislators to create bipartisan solutions to our education system rather than to continue to kick the can down the road hoping someone at some future time solves the problem. We believe policymakers can bring the federal government and the communities of Utah together to solve our public lands issues rather than talk past one another. We believe Utah can be a model for a more compassionate approach to refugees that befits the unique background of Utah. We believe we can reform our tax system to eliminate tax breaks that rob our education system.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeK

 

The untapped lessons hidden in computer games
Washington Post op-ed by Jonathan Aberman, founder of NSI, a national community that connects innovators to government agencies

We as a society need to be schooled on how today’s young people learn, why technology and gaming are not the enemy, and that traditional classrooms with rows of desks and 30 sets of eyes directed toward the same blackboard are outdated.
The computer gaming industry is booming, and we should better harness its power. Whether it is augmented reality Pokémon Go or massive multi-player games such as World of Warcraft, the opportunities for start-ups are mind-blowing. In 2015, the global computer gaming market was worth $70 billion.
Capturing the imagination and encouraging gamers to engross themselves completely is a very rewarding skill for designers, who have learned how to balance the attributes of a successful game including playability, plot and engagement. The best ones create a feedback loop between game and player; the more the user participates, the more rewarding it is.
When it comes to education, many parents still see video games as the enemy of learning. Nothing but a time suck. Yet, a growing number of educational experts are proving that the attributes of popular computer games get high scores when applied to learning.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aer

 

PBS Runs A Three-Hour Series Glorifying The DeVos Education Agenda
Funded by conservative foundations devoted to privatization, this program is the definition of paid propaganda.
Huffington Post commentary by Diane Ravitch, Research Professor of Education, New York University

Public education today faces an existential crisis. Over the past two decades, the movement to transfer public money to private organizations has expanded rapidly. The George W. Bush administration first wrote into federal law the proposal that privately managed charter schools were a remedy for low-scoring public schools, even though no such evidence existed. The Obama administration provided hundreds of millions each year to charter schools, under the control of private boards. Now, the Trump administration, under the leadership of Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, wants to expand privatization to include vouchers, virtual schools, cyberschools, homeschooling, and every other possible alternative to public education. DeVos has said that public education is a “dead end,” and that “government sucks.”
DeVos’s agenda finds a ready audience in the majority of states now controlled by Republican governors and legislatures. Most states already have some form of voucher program that allow students to use public money to enroll in private and religious schools, even when their own state constitution prohibits it. The Republicans have skirted their own constitutions by asserting that the public money goes to the family, not the private or religious school. The longstanding tradition of separating church and state in K-12 education is crumbling. And Betsy DeVos can testify with a straight face that she will enforce federal law to “schools that receive federal funding,” because voucher schools allegedly do not receive the money, just the family that chooses religious schools.
Advocates of the privatization movement like DeVos claim that nonpublic schools will “save poor children from failing public schools,” but independent researchers have recently concurred that vouchers actually have had a negative effect on students in the District of Columbia, Indiana, Louisiana, and Ohio. Charters, at best, have a mixed record, and many are known for excluding children with disabilities and English language learners and for pushing out students who are troublesome.
This is a time when honest, nonpartisan reporting is needed to inform the American public.
But this month the Public Broadcasting System is broadcasting a “documentary” that tells a one-sided story, the story that Betsy DeVos herself would tell, based on the work of free-market advocate Andrew Coulson. Author of “Market Education,” Coulson narrates “School, Inc.,” a three-hour program, which airs this month nationwide in three weekly broadcasts on PBS.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeA

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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DeVos Urges Charter Advocates to Embrace Wider View of School Choice, Warns Them Not to Become ‘The Man’
Criticism that DeVos won’t protect students’ civil rights “hurtful,” inaccurate, she says
(Washington, DC) The 74

Washington, D.C. — Education Secretary Betsy DeVos Tuesday praised the choice that charter schools provide while cautioning charter advocates they aren’t a panacea to fix education’s ills and should seek out new innovations.
Charter schools were created to provide options for children who weren’t served well by public schools, and early charter leaders weren’t afraid to embrace flexibility and innovation, DeVos told the National Charter Schools Conference.
“But somewhere along the way, in the intervening 26 years and through the process of expansion, we’ve taken the colorful collage of charters and drawn our own set of lines around it to box others out, to mitigate risk, to play it safe. This is not what we set out to do, and, more importantly, it doesn’t help kids,” she told the several hundred attendees gathered in the Washington Convention Center.
Some charter school advocates have been wary of embracing DeVos and President Donald Trump. Both have been strong supporters of charter schools, but have also advocated for private school choice, proposed big cuts to other K-12 education spending, and issued policies on immigration and healthcare that charter advocates fear could harm the students they serve.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aen

http://gousoe.uen.org/aez (USN&WR)

A copy of Secretary DeVos’ speech
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeu (ED)

 

Charter schools see opportunity with Republicans in power: lobbying group
Reuters

Having Republicans control both the White House and Congress could deliver more federal funds to charter schools and also create competition for dollars from alternative approaches to education, the head of a charter school lobbying group told its members on Monday.
President Donald Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, both Republicans, suggested in their proposed budget last month to increase federal funding for charter schools, which are public schools that are run independently from local districts, typically by a corporation.
“We have a huge opportunity to score major funding increases for our movement,” said National Alliance for Public Charter Schools President Nina Rees at an annual meeting. “But if you don’t speak up now, we may never have as good a chance to make a difference for our students.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aev

 

Who’s helping and who’s hurting? New national study looks at how charter networks measure up, from KIPP to K12
(New York) Chalkbeat

Some charter school networks are significantly improving student achievement, but others are harming student learning.
That’s the conclusion of the latest study from CREDO, a Stanford-based research group that has released some of the highest-profile research on charter schools.
In the new analysis, they set out to answer key questions that are hotly debated in the charter school world. What types of charters are most effective? Which networks are most successful? And what students benefit most?
A number of well known “no excuses”-style school networks like KIPP and YES Prep come out looking good, but others – including large virtual school networks and for-profit charters – don’t. And the authors of the report say too many schools aren’t being held accountable for their results.
“Charter school authorizers are charged with acting as the gatekeepers to ensure schools of choice are beneficial to their students,” the authors write. “Some of them seem to be abdicating that responsibility.”
The study is considerable in scope, and examining hundreds of school networks across 26 states between the 2012-13 and 2014-15 school years. (This and other studies from CREDO were funded by the Walton Family Foundation, which supports charter school expansion; Walton also supports Chalkbeat.)
Here’s what the study tells us:
http://gousoe.uen.org/aep

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeq (Stanford University)

 

Why for-profit charter schools are going out of style with some education reform leaders
(New York) Chalkbeat

Marshall Tuck is the last person you would expect to say it’s time to limit charter schools.
Tuck, a Democratic candidate for California schools superintendent, once oversaw a network of charter schools in Los Angeles and was heavily backed by the state’s charter lobby when he ran for (and narrowly lost) the post in 2014.
That’s why it’s surprising that one of Tuck’s first major policy announcements in his latest bid was a push to ban for-profit charter schools in California, a top priority of teachers unions.
“Educators – whether at district or charter public schools – can agree: public schools must serve students, not shareholders,” Tuck wrote. “Profit has no place in our public schools, and I urge politicians in Sacramento to make that the law.”
This fresh hostility toward for-profit charter schools extends beyond California. Across the country, more left-of-center charter school advocates are distancing themselves from for-profit charter schools. Some want to prohibit them outright.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeo

 

Deaf Kids with Cochlear Implants Do Better Without Sign Language
Not having learned sign language was tied to improved language, speaking, reading scores
(New York) MedPage Today

Deaf children with a cochlear implant who had no exposure to sign language fared better with speech, language, and reading comprehension than children with sign language exposure, researchers found.
In an observational study, a lower portion of children with no exposure to sign language produced less intelligible speech as young children, had higher language comprehension scores, and fewer were likely to have delayed language development, reported Ann E. Geers, PhD, of the University of Texas at Dallas, and colleagues.
Writing in Pediatrics, the authors cited the “paucity of data” comparing spoken language outcomes of deaf children learning language with or without learning sign language. Other studies found conflicting results — from one review that argued “the benefits of learning sign language outweigh the risks” to one that stated “insufficient evidence” exists on whether sign language is effective with oral language therapy.
An accompanying editorial by Karl R. White, PhD, of Utah State University, and Louis Z. Cooper, MD, of Columbia University, characterized the research as an example of how “well-designed research” can provide “credible and useful information.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeH

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeI (Pediatrics)

A copy of the editorial
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeJ (Pediatrics)

 

Trump to tout apprenticeships as way to fill jobs gap
Associated Press

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump says apprenticeships could match workers with millions of open jobs, but he’s reluctant to devote more taxpayer money to the effort.
Instead, Trump and Labor Secretary Alex Acosta say the administration is focused on getting universities and private companies to pair up and pay the cost of such learn-to-earn arrangements.
The president, whose resume includes a long run on TV’s “The Apprentice,” has accepted a challenge from Salesforce.com CEO Marc Benioff to create 5 million apprenticeships over five years. Now, as part of a weeklong apprenticeship push, he is visiting Waukesha County Technical College in Wisconsin on Tuesday with his daughter, Ivanka, as well as Acosta and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker.
“Apprenticeships are going to be a big, big factor in our country,” Trump said during his first-ever full Cabinet meeting Monday. “There are millions of good jobs that lead to great careers, jobs that do not require a four-year degree or the massive debt that often comes with those four-year degrees and even two-year degrees.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeG

 

Trump’s Labor secretary pans Rahm Emanuel’s graduation plan
Chicago Sun-Times

WASHINGTON – Labor Secretary R. Alexander Acosta panned Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s new high school graduation requirement, in which seniors will have to prove they are heading to college, the military, a trade or a job in order to get a diploma – saying Monday that a student should have a choice – not a mandate.
It’s a meaty public policy question: How far should government go in forcing students to have post-high school plans?
Last month, the Chicago school board approved Emanuel’s latest initiative to put the extra requirements on the Class of 2020 – something innovative, yes, but controversial because without a lot of counseling and related resources, this is easier decreed by CPS than done.
About 41 percent of Chicago Public Schools seniors don’t have a next step in place when they graduate, and Emanuel is gauging that these toughest cases will be helped more than hurt with the new reality that kids have to have their act together to get a CPS high school diploma.
Emanuel will be in Washington next Tuesday to deliver a speech at the National Press Club, where he is expected to tout on a national stage his latest proposal of moving to, as he has said, a pre-kindergarten to college model rather than K through 12.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aey

 

Grant Spotlight: $20 Million for PK-12 STEM Education
THE Journal

The National Science Foundation is awarding up to 18 multi-year grants for efforts that promote science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) in PK-12 schools. The awards this year are expected to total $10 million to $20 million, with individual awards ranging from $400,000 to $2 million apiece. The deadline for proposals this year is Sept. 5.
The program – Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) – is aimed at increasing awareness of STEM occupations among PK-12 students, motivating them to pursue STEM careers and helping them develop “disciplinary-based knowledge and practices, or promote critical thinking, reasoning skills, or communication skills needed for entering STEM workforce sectors,” according to NSF.
Proposed programs can be designed for engaging students within school, outside of school or a combination of the two. Partnerships between PK-12 schools, colleges, universities and other organizations are encouraged.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aem

 

Coach, school district square off in federal court
Kitsap (WA) Sun

SEATTLE – Joe Kennedy watched impassively as attorneys in his religious liberty case argued Monday in federal court.
Coach Joe Kennedy and his legal team appeared in federal appeals court in Seattle on June 12, 2017, for a hearing on his religious liberty case. Michaela Ramon
Kennedy, a former assistant football coach for Bremerton School District, claims his rights to free speech and religious expression were violated when the district in September 2015 prohibited him from praying after games on the 50-yard line.
Kennedy initially abided by the prayer ban, but later defied it.
The district said Kennedy had violated its policy upholding the separation of church and state. He was placed on paid leave and his contract was not renewed in 2016.
Kennedy sued the district to regain his job and the right to pray on the field after games.
Attorneys on both sides of the case presented oral arguments Monday before a three-judge panel in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aex

 

Sandy Hook group dumps Megyn Kelly as event host
Associated Press

NEW YORK- An anti-gun violence organization founded by parents of children killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School has dumped Megyn Kelly as host of an event in Washington this week because of her plans to broadcast an interview with conspiracy theorist Alex Jones.
Kelly said Tuesday that she understands and respects the decision by Sandy Hook Promise to disinvite her as host of its Wednesday gala, but is disappointed. She said reporting on Jones’ falsehoods is what journalists are supposed to do.
NBC is taking considerable heat on social media for its Father’s Day broadcast of Kelly’s interview with “Infowars” host Alex Jones, who has questioned whether the killing of 26 people in 2012 at the school in Newtown, Connecticut, was a hoax. The firm JPMorgan Chase has asked that its advertisement not run on the broadcast.
“Sandy Hook Promise cannot support the decision by Megyn or NBC to give any form of voice or platform to Alex Jones and have asked Megyn Kelly to step down as our Promise Champion Gala host,” said Nicole Hockley, co-founder and managing director. “It is our hope that Megyn and NBC reconsider and not broadcast this interview.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aew

 

Richard Dawkins: religious education is crucial for British schoolchildren
(London) Telegraph

Religious education is crucial in schools for British children to understand their history and culture, Richard Dawkins has said.
The evolutionary biologist and confirmed atheist warned that it was virtually impossible to study English literature without knowing the background of Christianity.
Speaking at the Cheltenham Science Festival, he was asked whether religious studies should be abolished in schools, over fears that schoolchildren were being brainwashed.
“I don’t think religious education should be abolished,” he said,
“I think that it is an important part of our culture to know about the Bible after all so much of English literature has allusions to the Bible, if you look up the Oxford English Dictionary you find something like the same number of quotations from the Bible as from Shakespeare.
“It’s an important part of our history. So much of European history is dominated by disputes against rival religions and you can’t understand history unless you know about the history of the Christian religion and the Crusades and so on.
“I would not abolish religions education, I think I would substitute it for comparative religion and Biblical history and religious history.
“Comparative religion is very valuable partly because the child learns that there are lots of different religions not just the one they were brought up with. They learn they are all different and they can’t all be right, so maybe none of the are right. Critical thinking is what we need.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeB

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

June 20:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

June 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

Government Operations Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 450 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002648.htm

Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Interim Committee meeting
1:15 p.m., 30 House Building
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002679.htm

Revenue and Taxation Interim Committee
1:15 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002691.htm

July 13:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 14:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

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