Education News Roundup: June 14, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Utah State Capitol

Utah State Capitol

Are legislators looking at a property tax increase for Utah schools?
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeW (UP)

Cache and Washington districts are the latest to offer teachers pay raises.
http://gousoe.uen.org/af7 (LHJ)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/af9 (SGN)

Canyons District updates its school lunch arrears account policy.
http://gousoe.uen.org/af0 (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/afc (DN via KSL)

Canyons also looks at the possibility of a private transportation provider for students who live up the canyon.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeZ (DN)

Ed Week’s annual Technology Counts issue is out.
http://gousoe.uen.org/afh (Ed Week)
or all of the sidebar stories
http://gousoe.uen.org/afi (Ed Week)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Legislators mulling property tax increase to boost school funding

CCSD proposes 16 percent pay increase for new teachers

Teachers see raises; school district adopts $330 million budget

New York spends more per student than any other state for 5th year in a row

How States Fail Their Teachers on Retirement: New Report Gives 42 States Failing Grades for Pensions
42 states, D.C. get failing grades for teacher pension plans, Bellwether Education Teacher Pension report

Canyon School Board votes on policy on student lunch accounts in arrears

Private transportation provider could replace school bus in Big Cottonwood Canyon

Kids Need Help ‘Code-Switching’ From Texting To Typing

Provo school district won’t allow e-sports on district’s network, for now

Utah State Board of Education approves audit of school fees

School board selects new member

Summer lunch program serves up free meals to area kids

Demolition of old North Elementary building

United Way of Utah County’s Read-Along event brings families together

BYU’s Museum Camp lets students go behind the scenes at its museums

Nu Skin supports Utah students at Force for Good Day

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Patricia Garcia

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Dallin Hardy

OPINION & COMMENTARY

With tax increase idea, marketing is in play

Successful School Partnerships: The Utah World Language Example

Nothing Succeeds Like Success Academy
Charter schools keep educating poor kids-and drawing resistance from liberal politicians.

What’s Wrong With Letting Tech Run Our Schools
It’s politically and ethically fraught, with no proven upside.

Critique of School Inc. Illustrates Why Airing It Is Right

NATION

Data Dive: Devices and Software Flooding Into Classrooms
More access hasn’t meant better use

Can Scientists Help End the Teacher Shortage?
Technology and math professionals are leaving the laboratory to lead the classroom.

Fourteen Colorado schools have 100 percent vaccination rates. See if your child’s school is one of them.
Adams 14 has highest vaccination rate among large districts

Voucher schools would have to conduct background checks

A Favorite Subject Returns to Schools: Recess
After playtime was dropped amid focus on academic performance, educators now take playground breaks seriously

Knee surgery rates soaring among teen girls

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Legislators mulling property tax increase to boost school funding

Some GOP legislators say they will support a small increase in local school district property taxes next year, while actively opposing an income tax increase for public schools.
The Our Schools Now citizens’ initiative petition is staying away from the property tax part of the school funding equation because it is much too complicated to deal with in the petition format, UtahPolicy is told.
Last week the OSN group formally submitted its petition to the state Elections Office.
If approved by voters in November 2018, it would increase the state portion of the sales tax by 0.5 percentage points, and increase the personal income tax rate of 5 percent to 5.5 percent – over a three-year phase-in.
When all of the tax hikes are in place in 2020, the petition law will raise around $700 million a year for public schools.
Capitol Hill sources tell UtahPolicy that while few GOP lawmakers will support OSN in total, there are some conservatives who may oppose the income tax hike and stay neutral on the sales tax increase.
And there will be a legislative push to do something with property taxes to help schools in the 2018 Legislature, sources said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeW (UP)

 

CCSD proposes 16 percent pay increase for new teachers

With increasing competition for a limited number of teachers throughout the state, Cache County School District Personnel Director Kirk McRae on Tuesday announced a tentative plan for all school district employees to receive a 5 percent cost of living adjustment as well as a 16 percent pay increase for first-year teachers.
After holding annual negotiations with staff, McRae recommended that new teachers earn a starting salary of $40,700. He told the CCSD Board of Education that the economy is strong and the legislature has made education a priority this year by approving a 4 percent weighted pupil unit increase. The board will vote on the plan in their meeting next Thursday.
http://gousoe.uen.org/af7 (LHJ)

 

Teachers see raises; school district adopts $330 million budget

ST. GEORGE – During a regular meeting of the Washington County School Board of Education Tuesday, the board unanimously voted to adopt a proposed $330 million total budget for the 2017-2018 fiscal year. The board also adopted the final budget for the 2016-2017 fiscal year.
The maintenance and operations budget, district administrator Brent Bills said, was previously proposed at approximately $211 million and has gone down about $750,000.
http://gousoe.uen.org/af9 (SGN)

 

New York spends more per student than any other state for 5th year in a row

New York for the fifth year in a row spent more money per student than any other state, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
In fiscal year 2015, New York spent $21,206 per pupil. That’s an all-time high for New York, up by nearly $600 from the previous year’s total of $20,610.
New York’s per pupil spending is almost double the national average of $11,392. It’s more than three times as much as Utah’s per pupil spending average. At $6,575 per student, Utah has the lowest rate.
http://gousoe.uen.org/afo ([Syracuse] New York Upstate.com)

 

How States Fail Their Teachers on Retirement: New Report Gives 42 States Failing Grades for Pensions
42 states, D.C. get failing grades for teacher pension plans, Bellwether Education Teacher Pension report

The vast majority of states are failing teachers when it comes to their retirement, according to a new analysis.
A report out today by Bellwether Education Partners grades teacher pension plans on an A-F scale, giving 42 of the 50 states and the District of Columbia an F for their educator retirement systems. No state scored higher than a C: Utah, Oregon, and Tennessee lead the pack with the average letter grade. Alaska, Virginia, Washington, Indiana, Idaho, and New York barely pass with Ds.
Bellwether’s Chad Aldeman and Kirsten Schmitz rate states not on specific policy choices but on how well each caters to its unique workforce. The metrics they use are based on two fundamental questions: “Are all of the state’s teachers earning sufficient retirement benefits?” and “Can teachers take their retirement benefits with them no matter where life takes them?” A state would earn a perfect score if it offered all its educators “a portable and financially secure retirement plan.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/afq (The 74)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/afr (Bellwether Education)

 

Canyon School Board votes on policy on student lunch accounts in arrears

SANDY – In keeping with a new U.S. Department of Agriculture requirement, the Canyons Board of Education’s new policy on school lunch debt ensures children are kept out of the loop in conversations about owed money, even high schoolers.
The school board passed the policy late Tuesday night.
The board’s policy was developed to comply with the USDA mandate that all schools across the country have policies in place by July 1 that state how they will handle situations where students do not have money in their lunch accounts or cash on hand to pay for meals.
The USDA, as overseer of federally supported school nutrition programs, is attempting to address reports of shaming of students whose parents owe money to schools for school lunches or breakfasts.
http://gousoe.uen.org/af0 (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/afc (DN via KSL)

 

Private transportation provider could replace school bus in Big Cottonwood Canyon

SANDY – The Canyons Board of Education voted late Tuesday to direct school administrators to explore entering a contract with a private transportation provider to serve schoolchildren in Big Cottonwood Canyon.
It was the fourth time the board had discussed the issue. The administration recommended in April that the board end the service in the face of growing safety concerns and dwindling ridership.
According to the district’s numbers for May and June, the highest ridership was 12 students, with most days three or four children riding the bus. On May 30, no children rode the bus coming or going.
The bus route traverses a road that an engineering consultant to the Utah State Division of Risk Management described in a letter to the school district as “unsafe for bus travel” because of its steep grades, curves, lack of guard rails, narrowness and increased use by hikers and bicyclists.
Board member Steve Wrigley said parents need to be able to work, but the school district needs kids to get to school, whether that means contracting with a private provider or the district purchasing a large sport-utility vehicle.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeZ (DN)

 

Kids Need Help ‘Code-Switching’ From Texting To Typing

A recently published study from Brigham Young University shows that kids are sloppier writers when typing on a computer rather than with pencil and paper.
The students used for the study were 8th graders. So, probably not particularly neat writers to begin with. But when given the same writing prompt, once for a response on paper and another on a Chromebook computer, the typed essays tended to be a little more freeform.
“Some of the common mistakes we saw were capitalization errors, not capitalizing the beginning of sentences, not using punctuation, doing run on sentences,” says Royce Kimmons, the BYU professor responsible for the study.
Kimmons says some students even used emoticons, like little smiles, in place of words. He says they are the same kinds of errors found in texting or social media. The kids have developed shortcuts in their writing and it shows when they start typing.
“If I’m an English teacher I need to help my kids understand that though those norms of participation are acceptable in texting or gaming, they aren’t acceptable when I’m writing a formal essay,” says Kimmons.
http://gousoe.uen.org/afd (KUER)

 

Provo school district won’t allow e-sports on district’s network, for now

Provo City School District is pausing the possibility of opening up the district’s network for e-sports.
The district likely won’t be opening up its network for online gaming in the near future, but expects it eventually will.
“I think we need to take it slow and be patient with it,” said Chad Duncan, the district’s technology director, to the Provo City School District Board of Education during its study session Tuesday evening.
The discussion on online gaming took place in a study session and a vote on the issue did not happen during a later business meeting.
http://gousoe.uen.org/af2 (PDH)

 

Utah State Board of Education approves audit of school fees

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – (KUTV) If you have kids in school, then you probably know all about school fees.
The Utah State Board of Education is now taking a closer look to determine whether those fees are being implemented fairly and whether some students are being prevented from enjoying all the benefits of public education.
“We’re just looking to ensure that access is there for each student,” said Brittney Cummins, Utah State Board of Education vice-chair.
http://gousoe.uen.org/afb (KUTV)

 

School board selects new member

The Park City Board of Education chose Anne Peters on Tuesday morning to replace outgoing board member Phil Kaplan, who announced his intention to resign this spring for personal reasons. According to the Park City School District’s website, pcschools.us, the vote was 3-1, with Julie Eihausen, board president, voting against Peters. Peters beat out other candidates Tommy Tanzer and James Meyer, who also interviewed for the position. Peters will serve District 1, representing the Prospector, Upper and Lower Deer Valley, Old Town or Thaynes neighborhoods.
http://gousoe.uen.org/afn (PR)

 

Summer lunch program serves up free meals to area kids

ST. GEORGE – A free lunch program for all children ages 18 and younger is now in service through July 20.
Any child can enjoy a well-rounded, delicious meal Monday through Thursday, a notice posted on Washington County’s official website states, by just showing up at one of the locations listed below.
http://gousoe.uen.org/afa (SGN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/afm (UP)

 

Demolition of old North Elementary building

Construction crews wrapped up demolition of the old North Elementary building on Tuesday, June 13, 2017.
http://gousoe.uen.org/af8 (SGS) video

 

United Way of Utah County’s Read-Along event brings families together

While most people are aware that reading aloud to children helps develop crucial literacy skills, one benefit of reading together doesn’t always get as much attention: reading aloud improves relationships. That’s why the Utah County Read-Along is raising books for families in our community.
The Read-Along, now in its third year, is an annual event held in conjunction with United Way Worldwide’s Day of Action. The premise of the event? On the longest days of the year, spend some time giving back and reaching out to others.
In Utah County, community members are asked to take advantage of those extra daylight hours to read aloud to someone else for at least fifteen minutes and report that time online to United Way. Last year, 230 Utah County readers read for 181 hours. This year, the goal is to have 300 people read aloud for 250 hours during those two days.
http://gousoe.uen.org/af5 (PDH)

 

BYU’s Museum Camp lets students go behind the scenes at its museums

Brigham Young University’s newest summer camp is a little less Boy Scouts and a little more Night at the Museum.
Museum Camp gives kids between the ages of 13 and 15 the chance to go behind the scenes at the Provo university’s four museums as they learn what goes into creating exhibits, and even curate one of their own.
http://gousoe.uen.org/af1 (PDH)

 

Nu Skin supports Utah students at Force for Good Day

Nu Skin employees and their families assembled back-to-school kits for local students and worked to beautify downtown Provo on Thursday.
As part of the Force for Good, Nu Skin teamed up with United Way of Utah County and Downtown Provo for the special service project.
The volunteers assembled 10,000 back-to-school kits filled with education supplies for students in Nebo, Alpine and Provo City school districts at more than 25 schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/af6 (PDH)

 

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Patricia Garcia

Patricia Garcia, a kindergarten teacher at Santaquin Elementary in Nebo School District, is being recognized as this week’s Utah Valley Educator of the Week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/af3 (PDH)

 

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Dallin Hardy

Dallin Hardy, a sixth-grader at Sierra Bonita Elementary in Nebo School District, is being recognized as this week’s Utah Valley Student of the Week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/af4 (PDH)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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With tax increase idea, marketing is in play
Davis County Clipper commentary by columnist BRYAN GRAY

The opinions stated in this article are solely those of the author and not of The Davis Clipper.
In a battle to sway public opinion, facts are often less important than marketing. Utahans will see this during the next 18 months, and my crystal ball cannot reveal which side will win.
The issue should be of concern to everybody living here: raising money for public education. A group of civic and business leaders have filed separate papers to initiate an Our Schools Now tax hike. If proponents are able to secure an appropriate number of signatures from voters in 26 of 29 Senate districts, the issue will appear on the 2018 ballot.
If you ask people whether public education should receive more money, the vast majority will nod their head. If you ask the same people to fork over more taxes, the support starts evaporating. It’s human nature; we want to better our society but we hope someone else will pay for it.
http://gousoe.uen.org/afp

 

Successful School Partnerships: The Utah World Language Example
Education Week op-ed by Fernando Rubio, Jill Landes-Lee, and Jane Hacking of the University of Utah

The United States is still neglecting language education, as recently released studies are showing. Dual language immersion (DLI) programs, however, seem to be bucking this trend. The number of DLI programs in the US has grown exponentially over the past few years, from 242 in 1997 to almost 450 in 2011. Nowhere is this truer than in Utah, where currently 161 schools have DLI programs in one of five languages: Chinese, French, German, Portuguese, and Spanish. This year, Utah is adding Russian, and the number of students reached is projected to hit 39,000 in 196 schools.
As anyone who has tried to learn a language knows painfully well, becoming proficient is a long process. In order to deliver on the promise to produce truly bilingual and bicultural citizens, Utah’s DLI program recognized that it would need to extend beyond the secondary level and provide a continuous path from elementary through postsecondary education.
Students follow a 50/50 model until grade 6 (50 percent of instruction in English and 50 percent in the target language). In grades 7 and 8, students take two courses in the target language, and in grade 9, students prepare to take the Advanced Placement (AP) exam. Students who pass the AP exam can then enroll in one upper-level university course in each of their last three years of high school. This unique Language Bridge Program, a partnership between all Utah institutions of higher education and school districts with DLI programs, is designed to fill the gap between completion of the AP exam and the start of higher education. It ensures uninterrupted language education and promotes an articulated vision for K-16 language study, establishing a clear K-16 pathway and a career pathway in two languages.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeV

 

Nothing Succeeds Like Success Academy
Charter schools keep educating poor kids-and drawing resistance from liberal politicians.
Wall Street Journal op-ed by Jason L. Riley, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute

Another school year, another accolade for New York City’s Success Academy Charter Schools.
On Monday Success Academy was awarded the Broad Prize for Public Charter Schools. A press release noted that the Success schools “demonstrated the best overall academic performance while closing achievement gaps and serving low-income students and students of color.” Liberals insist that the learning gap between white students and their black and Hispanic peers stems primarily from poverty and racial segregation, but the track record of Success Academy challenges both notions.
Students at Success schools, the first of which opened in 2006, are chosen by lottery. Detractors complain that charter schools teach more-motivated students, but random-assignment studies that control for self-selection bias have found that charter students tend to outperform their counterparts in traditional public schools and are more likely to finish college. Today, there are 41 Success schools serving 41,000 K-12 students-76% of whom are poor and 93% black or Hispanic. In 2016, for the eighth consecutive year, Success schools were among the highest performing in New York state. Ninety-four percent of Success students eligible to take state tests were proficient in math, and 82% were proficient in English-both more than double the statewide average.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeU $

 

What’s Wrong With Letting Tech Run Our Schools
It’s politically and ethically fraught, with no proven upside.
Bloomberg commentary by Cathy O’Neil, a mathematician who has worked as a professor, hedge-fund analyst and data scientist

Silicon Valley tech moguls are conducting an enormous experiment on the nation’s children. We should not be so trusting that they’ll get it right.
Alphabet Inc. unit Google has taken a big role in public education, offering low-cost laptops and free apps. Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook Inc. is investing heavily in educational technology, largely though the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. Netflix Inc. head Reed Hastings has been tinkering with expensive and algorithmic ed-tech tools.
Encouraging as all this may be, the technologists might be getting ahead of themselves, both politically and ethically. Also, there’s not a lot of evidence that what they’re doing works.
Like it or not, education is political. People on opposite sides of the spectrum read very different science books, and can’t seem to agree on fundamental principles. It stands to reason that what we choose to teach our children will vary, depending on our beliefs. That’s to acknowledge, not defend, anti-scientific curricula.
http://gousoe.uen.org/afk

 

Critique of School Inc. Illustrates Why Airing It Is Right
Cato Institute commentary by NEAL MCCLUSKEY, director of the Center for Educational Freedom

Stalwart public schooling defender Diane Ravitch does not like what she saw in School Inc., a three-part documentary series created by former Cato education analyst Andrew Coulson. Of course, she is welcome to disagree with it. But her main complaint-that PBS dared show the documentary in the first place-is concerning from a public debate perspective, while her more substantive critiques of School Inc. illustrate precisely why we need to let all voices engage in debates, not just those with whom we agree.
From the outset, let’s be clear. Neither the documentary itself nor PBS hide one iota what is being presented: the views of Andrew Coulson. Heck, the subtitle of School Inc. is “A Personal Journey with Andrew Coulson.” It leaves it to viewers-not gatekeepers who may just dislike Coulson’s point of view-to decide if the case Coulson makes is persuasive. And if we are after open discussion and truth, what should matter is not who funded the documentary-Ravitch portrays School Inc. sponsors as frightening bogeymen-but the content of the documentary.
Ravitch does address some of the substance of School Inc., but in so doing reveals why it is so crucial that all sides of controversial issues get heard, not just those with which she agrees. Quite simply, many of her knocks on the substance are themselves highly questionable.
http://gousoe.uen.org/afl

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Data Dive: Devices and Software Flooding Into Classrooms
More access hasn’t meant better use
Education Week

Public schools have more classroom technology and faster internet connections than ever before, and teachers and students alike report using the digital tools at their disposal more frequently than in years past.
But a new analysis of the National Assessment of Educational Progress survey data by the Education Week Research Center highlights two troubling trends:
Despite the promise of building “21st century skills,” such as creativity and problem-solving, students report using computers in school most often for activities that involve rote practice.
And even as their classrooms have been inundated with new devices and software, the percent of teachers who say they’ve received training on how to effectively use such technology has remained flat, with a persistent divide between high- and low-poverty schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/afh

Sidebar stories
http://gousoe.uen.org/afi (Ed Week)

 

Can Scientists Help End the Teacher Shortage?
Technology and math professionals are leaving the laboratory to lead the classroom.
Atlantic

Two years ago, LaTeira Haynes was working in a quiet laboratory at UC San Diego finishing up her doctorate in biomedical engineering. Now, she’s teaching a 9th-grade biology class in South Los Angeles that is so large she uses a microphone to be heard over the constant din of teenage chatter, rustling worksheets, and the zipping and unzipping of backpacks.
But to her, there is no sweeter sound.
“These students are here. They want to be here. I want to be here,” said the energetic second-year teacher, her hair pulled back and her hoop earrings flashing. “I have 47 kids in this class and 44 of them are here today. That’s huge.”
Just 3.6 percent of adults age 25 or over in the neighborhood where Dymally High School is located have a four-year college degree. That’s a long way from the seaside bluffs of La Jolla, where Haynes was studying immune cells and mulling a career in research. But Haynes said Dymally is a perfect fit for her, and teaching high school is a far more rewarding career than working in a lab.
Named a rookie-teacher-of-the-year in Los Angeles Unified last year, Haynes, 30, is among a growing number of science, technology, engineering, and math professionals in California who’ve forsaken the comforts of laboratories, office parks, and six-figure salaries to teach high school-often in schools with a majority of students living in poverty, learning English, or facing other challenges.
http://gousoe.uen.org/afj

 

Fourteen Colorado schools have 100 percent vaccination rates. See if your child’s school is one of them.
Adams 14 has highest vaccination rate among large districts
Denver Post

The vast majority of Colorado schoolkids are receiving the recommended immunizations, but the state Health Department on Tuesday released a new tool to help parents look more locally.
The department collected vaccination data for more than 850,000 kids in 1,801 schools during the 2016-17 school year. The research found that 93.4 percent of students were up-to-date on their recommended immunizations. Only 2.6 percent of students’ parents or guardians had claimed an exemption from vaccinations, the large majority of those falling under the “personal exemption” heading. Exemptions for religious or medical reasons each made up less than 10 percent of the total exemptions.
In a first, the department also made school and district-level data on immunizations easily available to the public, through a website where parents can search for individual schools or download numbers from every school all at once. The numbers can also be accessed by going to www.coloradoimmunizations.com.
The Health Department also collected data from child care facilities and preschools, and it made the numbers available on the same website.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeY

 

Voucher schools would have to conduct background checks
Associated Press

MADISON, Wis.- Private schools participating in Wisconsin’s voucher school program would have to conduct employee background checks under a bill up for state Senate approval.
The bipartisan measure up for a vote Wednesday includes a number of changes to the state’s voucher program. It’s supported both by advocates for school choice and the state Department of Public Instruction. No one has registered against the measure, which makes mostly technical changes.
The bill would do away with certain academic benchmarks that choice schools must currently meet, but DPI backs that change because the private schools are still subject to state report cards.
http://gousoe.uen.org/afg

 

A Favorite Subject Returns to Schools: Recess
After playtime was dropped amid focus on academic performance, educators now take playground breaks seriously
Wall Street Journal

Three kindergarten girls looked close to taking a spill as they sat on the high back of a playground bench at Oak Point Elementary. Feet away, several administrators didn’t make a move to stop them because at this school outside Dallas, playtime is revered.
“As long as they’re safe, we allow kids to be kids,” said Daniel Gallagher, assistant superintendent for educational services in the Little Elm Independent School District.
That’s the mantra in this small school district, where schoolchildren are transitioning from one daily 30-minute recess to one hour a day, taken in 15-minute increments. School officials say children are better focused with more unstructured breaks and do better in school.
School districts throughout the country are reassessing recess-with some bringing back the pastime or expanding it, citing academic and health benefits.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aeX $

 

Knee surgery rates soaring among teen girls
Reuters

A growing number of U.S. athletes are getting operations to repair torn knee ligaments, and a new study suggests injury rates are highest and rising fastest among teen girls.
Researchers focused on surgery for a common knee injury known as an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, which has long been linked to intense participation in sports like basketball and soccer which require constant pivoting as well as contact sports like football.
The study of private insurance data for 148 million U.S. residents found that overall, the average annual ACL surgery rate climbed 22 percent from 2002 to 2014, when it reached 75 procedures for every 100,000 people.
For teen girls, however, the average annual knee surgery rate rose by 59 percent during the study period to 269 procedures for every 100,000 people.
http://gousoe.uen.org/afe

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/aff (AMA Pediatrics) $

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

June 20:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

June 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

Government Operations Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 450 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002648.htm

Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Interim Committee meeting
1:15 p.m., 30 House Building
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002679.htm

Revenue and Taxation Interim Committee
1:15 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002691.htm

July 13:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 14:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

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