Education News Roundup: June 20, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Census Bureau report issued last week shows Utah still in last place for per-pupil funding.
http://gousoe.uen.org/agT (UP)

Audit criticizes Utah State Charter School Board on use of school start-up funding.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahj (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/ahn (KUTV)
or a copy of the audit
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahk (Utah State Auditor’s Office)

Cache HR director says his district is attracting and retaining teachers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahl (CVD)

AdvancED hopes to expand its school improvement business under ESSA provisions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ah4 (Ed Week)

Is more kale the key to getting into Yale?
http://gousoe.uen.org/agZ (The 74)
or a copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/ah0 (National Bureau of Economic Research) $

Or is it a matter of assigning more writing?
http://gousoe.uen.org/ah7 (Ed Week)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Bad news for Utah: New Census report shows Utah still In last place in per-pupil education funding

Audit dings Utah Charter School Board for improper use of state startup funds

Cache Valley still attracting, retaining good teachers

Canyons Film Festival teaches organizational, literacy skills

Former Landmark High School teacher likely to remain in jail until sentencing for sex abuse

Canyon School District students receive STEM scholarships

New Draper Elementary principal named as Riddle leaves

High school lacrosse sanctioned for the state

OPINION & COMMENTARY

In Education, Democracy Is the Threat

Our Schools Are Actually Resegregating
Here’s one way to stop the trend.

Dumb and Dumber: America’s Driver Education is failing us all
How we teach adolescents to pilot two-ton death machines in the U.S.

The critical importance of costs for education decisions

NATION

Leading School Accreditor Sees Expansion Opportunity Under ESSA

DeVos becomes digital lightning rod for Democrats

Is California’s big investment in needy students paying off? Few signs yet that achievement gap is closing

Oregon ranked best in country for educating homeless students

You Are What You Eat (at School): Report Shows Healthy School Lunches Tied to Higher Student Test Scores

Competition reward encourages students to study STEM

This New NASA Astronaut Has a Powerful Message for Girls in STEM

Worried About Hackers? Call a Girl Scout

Kids and Guns: Shootings Now Third Leading Cause of Death for U.S. Children

How a Simple Writing Exercise in Middle School Led to Higher College Enrollment

Can These 11 States Make Their Teaching Forces More Diverse by 2040?

Haunted by a Player’s Death, a Coach Walks Away From His Sport

Bosnian students keep up their protest against segregated schools

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Bad news for Utah: New Census report shows Utah still In last place in per-pupil education funding

The U.S. Census Bureau released its annual comparison of state education finances, finding that Utah remains in last place in per-pupil current expenditures, as has been the case every year since 1988.
The report released June 14, 2017, entitled “Public Education Finances: 2015” and available online at https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/school-finances.html, finds that Utah spent $6,575 per pupil in the 2014-2015 school year, compared to $6,500 the year before. Since the national CPI-U inflation rate was 0% between 2014 and 2015, this represented a real increase of 1% in Utah’s per pupil education investment between the two school years.
Unfortunately, this 1% increase was not enough to surpass our perennial rival for 49th place, Idaho. In recent years, the gap between Utah and Idaho had shrunk to as little as $121 per pupil in FY 2014, a gap Utah could have overcome that year with an additional $74 million budget allocation. But for FY 2015, the most recent comparison year in the new federal data, the gap grew to $348 per pupil, which would have required $216 million in additional funding to overcome.
http://gousoe.uen.org/agT (UP)

 

Audit dings Utah Charter School Board for improper use of state startup funds

A state start-up grant was improperly awarded to Athlos Academy before the Herriman charter school was formally approved for operation, according to a report released Tuesday by the Utah State Auditor.
The State Charter School Board approved a $124,100 grant for Athlos Academy in July of 2015, the report states, three months after the Utah Board of Education voted to deny Athlos’ application to open a school.
Athlos Academy’s application was later approved by the state school board in September 2015 and the State Charter School Board began distributing start-up funding to the school that December. But it was not until the following July that a charter agreement was signed by Athlos Academy and the State Charter School Board, according to the report,
“While our inquiry was focused only on the disbursement to Athlos,” wrote audit manager Julie Wrigley, “we are concerned that the SCSB [State Charter School Board] processes have allowed and may continue to allow charter schools to receive funds and to operate without the proper contract agreements in place.”
The report states that awarding funding before a charter agreement was executed violates the grant requirements, and “creates uncertainty regarding the extent to which charter school applicants are subject to laws and regulations” that protect public funding from abuse.
The auditor’s office recommended that funding be withheld until charter agreements have been signed by all parties; that start-up grant applications be properly reviewed; and that the State Charter School Board consider recovering state funding if other violations are identified.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahj (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/ahn (KUTV)

A copy of the audit
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahk (Utah State Auditor’s Office)

 

Cache Valley still attracting, retaining good teachers

When the economy is good and there are many jobs available, attracting and retaining good teachers can be difficult. According to Kirk McRae, human resources director for the Cache County School District, that situation is prevalent right now in many places.
However, on KVNU’s For the People program Monday, June 19, McRae said the situation is not prevalent in local districts, and there are several significant reasons why. For example, he said it’s the quality of the people, the fact that there is a quality university so close and also that the Utah State Legislature has done what it can to come up with the money needed for salaries and operations.
“The school districts here in Cache Valley really do have an advantage,” McRae said, “but I see that over time, especially as other districts increase salaries and try to compete for those candidates, that we’re going to have to do the same to increase our salaries, our benefits, so that those advantages that we do have don’t get eroded over time.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahl (CVD)

 

Canyons Film Festival teaches organizational, literacy skills

It’s a few months after the red carpet at the eighth annual Canyons Film Festival rolled up, but what students learned in creating their entries will be put to use in the classroom.
District Education Technology Specialist Katie Blunt said the skills students learn, such as organization and literacy, translate into their classroom work as well as in the films they create.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahi (Draper Journal)

 

Former Landmark High School teacher likely to remain in jail until sentencing for sex abuse

A former Landmark High School teacher will likely remain in jail while she awaits sentencing after striking a plea deal earlier this month.
Sarah Lewis pleaded guilty to one second-degree felony of forcible sexual abuse after two male students came forward and told police she had sexual intercourse with them.
Lewis, 28, appeared Monday in Provo’s Fourth District Court before Judge Samuel McVey with her attorney, Tom Means, to ask for a reduced bail to attend to family matters before she is likely sentenced to prison on July 17.
“Mrs. Lewis has certain aspects of responsibility of her life that she is tasked with,” Means said. “I am not concerned that she would fail to appear [at her sentencing].”
Prior to Monday’s hearing, Lewis’s bail was $22,500, with $20,000 being cash only and $2,500 being bondable.
McVey ruled that her bail be altered to just $20,000 cash only, eliminating the $2,500 bondable.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ah5 (PDH)

 

Canyon School District students receive STEM scholarships

After having an introduction to coding in school, Draper Park Middle School student Drake Larsen decided he wanted to learn more.
So the sixth-grader decided to apply for a RizePoint STEM scholarship to attend a Code Changers camp to challenge himself.
“I’m really looking forward to learning more coding,” Drake said. “In Hour of Code at school, we’ve learned how to make a character move or create shapes. I’ve done some pretty cool stuff in Scratch and Java too.”
On May 17, 20 Canyons School District students from fifth grade through tenth grade were honored as RizePoint scholarship recipients after a committee reviewed their applications, which included personal explanations of their own ambitions to learn at a STEM camp, their academic records and recommendations from a teacher and a peer.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahm (Draper Journal)

 

New Draper Elementary principal named as Riddle leaves

Draper Elementary students shouldn’t be surprised next fall when they see their new principal riding a bike to school.
Christy Waddell, who is an outdoor enthusiast, will take the helm of Draper Elementary July 1, replacing Piper Riddle, who has taken a principal’s post with Heber Elementary, a Spanish dual-immersion school in Heber, Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahh (Draper Journal)

 

High school lacrosse sanctioned for the state

When the Utah High School Activity Association (UHSAA) finally sanctioned the sport of lacrosse as a varsity sport for the state of Utah, Brae Burbidge was in shock.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahg (Draper Journal)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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In Education, Democracy Is the Threat
Cato Institute commentary by NEAL MCCLUSKEY, director of Cato’s Center for Educational Freedom

When people hear “democracy,” they tend to get warm, fuzzy feelings. As the Century Foundation’s Richard Kahlenberg writes in an article that, among other things, portrays private school choice as a threat to democracy, “public education…was also meant to instill a love of liberal democracy: a respect for the separation of powers, for a free press and free religious exercise, and for the rights of political minorities.” The fundamental, ironic problem is that both democracy and democratically controlled public schooling are inherently at odds with the individual rights, and even separation of powers, that Kahlenberg says democracy and public schools are supposed to protect.
Let’s be clear what “democracy” means: the people collectively, rather than a single ruler or small group of rulers, make decisions for the group. We typically think of this as being done by voting, with the majority getting its way.
Certainly, it is preferable for all people to have a say in decisions that will be imposed on them than to have a dictator impose things unilaterally. But there is nothing about letting all people have a vote on imposition that protects freedom. Indeed, in a pure democracy, as long as the majority decides something, no individual rights are protected at all. The will of the majority is all that matters.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahd

 

Our Schools Are Actually Resegregating
Here’s one way to stop the trend.
The Nation commentary by columnist Michelle Chen

When black students marched nervously to their new classrooms during the first days of integrated public schools in the 1950s, the constitutional imperative of Brown v. Board of Education was fully behind them. But six decades on, public schools across the country seem to be marching backwards, and the Trump administration looks poised to claw them further back to the days of Jim Crow.
Even before Trump took office, the nation’s schools were backsliding toward resegregation, despite, or even because, of the formal abolition of segregation through the courts. Last year, an audit by the Government Accountability Office on educational segregation patterns revealed dramatic growth in segregated schools nationwide—defined as having three-quarters of their students in poverty and of black and Latino descent—since 2000, with racial polarization of schools rising under both Bush and Obama from 9 percent to 16 percent of schools in 2014.
The resegregation trends spurred some progressive lawmakers to seek to reverse the erosion of Brown through the Equity and Inclusion Enforcement Act (EIEA). Recently reintroduced by Representatives John Conyers of Michigan and Bobby Scott of Virginia, the legislation would modify the Civil Rights Act to enable communities to resist resegregation in the same arena where Brown was won: the courtroom. The bill would create a private right of action for individual families to take schools and policymakers to court over funding decisions that result in discrimination by race, ethnicity, or national origin—particularly in “denial or exclusion of services; decreased, poor, or low quality services; unsafe services; and the denial of the opportunity to participate as a member of a planning or advisory body.” The bill would also establish civil-rights monitors to “ensure that every school has at least one employee to specifically carry out the responsibilities of the law,” backed by a special position in the Education Department “to coordinate and promote Title VI enforcement of equity and inclusion in education.”
Altogether, the proposal would counter a 2001 Supreme Court ruling, Alexander v. Sandoval, that effectively stripped citizens of their right to bring civil suits against local funding policies that inflicted “disparate impact” based on race or ethnicity. The decision overturned longstanding equity-based statutes and left communities locked out of essential legal recourse against discrimination in school budgeting, transportation policy, and environmental regulations.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahf

 

Dumb and Dumber: America’s Driver Education is failing us all
How we teach adolescents to pilot two-ton death machines in the U.S.
Motor Trend commentary by columnist Mark Rechtin

Driver’s education is usually taught in high school health class. In those very same underfunded schools that can barely afford math and science textbooks, we are trying to teach adolescents how to pilot two-ton death machines.
In California, all that’s required to obtain a learner’s permit is 30 hours of classroom instruction and six hours behind the wheel; a provisional license requires an additional 50 hours of supervised driving. Some states with districts too poor to offer driver’s ed allow kids to learn how to drive online. Home-schooling allows parents to vouch that their kids have the requisite knowledge to apply for a license, and little prevents parents from fudging the numbers for the required hours of driving practice, either.
An eight-year study by the University of Nebraska showed that young drivers who dodged proper driver’s education are 75 percent more likely to get a traffic ticket, 24 percent more likely to be involved in an accident causing death or injury, and 16 percent more likely to have an accident of any kind. And that’s with our bare-bones system in place.
By comparison, a German driver’s license requires a minimum of 25 to 45 hours of professional driving instruction plus 12 hours of theory and eight hours of first aid training. In other words, you know what you are doing when you get your first set of car keys. Comparable German and U.S. federal data shows that young American drivers’ injury-crash rates have declined only slightly since 1990 while young German drivers’ injury-crash rates have dropped by more than half in the same period.
How our DMVs handle failure is appalling, too. When California discovered that only 45 percent of applicants passed its written test, rather than requiring better driver education, its DMV essentially made the test easier.
In America, we treat a driver’s license as a right, not a privilege. We beta-test our children on the open road, and the results are no surprise: The fatal crash rate per mile driven for 16- to 19-year-olds is triple the rate for the rest of the population, according to NHTSA’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahe

 

The critical importance of costs for education decisions
National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Analytic Technical Assistance and Development analysis

This brief is intended to help decision makers in schools, districts, state education departments, and intermediary organizations think about ways that cost analyses can help inform their decisions about program choices, budgets, and strategies.
http://gousoe.uen.org/agS

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Leading School Accreditor Sees Expansion Opportunity Under ESSA
Education Week

AdvancED—the nation’s largest pre-K-12 accrediting organization—is working to vastly expand its school improvement contractor operation to help states meet their commitments under the Every Student Succeeds Act.
Its suite of new online classroom-observation tools, consultant services, and teacher and leadership training is independent of the nonprofit’s bread-and-butter work of awarding or withholding its seal of approval for 27,000 of the nation’s elementary, middle, and high schools.
But the potential for an accrediting organization to become both a judge and a service provider under ESSA’s new era of school accountability has alarmed some school accountability researchers. They worry such an unregulated organization could use the heavy stick of accreditation to nudge states, districts, and schools into buying its growing list of school improvement services.
At least four states—Kentucky, North Dakota, South Carolina, and Wyoming—have already taken up AdvancED’s offer of expanded services to some degree, signing contracts ranging from $250,000 to $1 million this year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ah4

 

DeVos becomes digital lightning rod for Democrats
Politico

First it was Karl Rove. Then it was the Koch brothers. Now, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has taken over as Senate Democrats’ top online bogeyman. POLITICO’s Maggie Severns reports that anti-DeVos statements, petitions and especially fundraising emails have become a staple of Democratic digital campaigns in 2017. Emails citing DeVos are raising money at a faster clip than others and driving engagement from supporters.
— Some examples: Indiana Sen. Joe Donnelly’s Facebook post announcing opposition to DeVos’ nomination as Education secretary was the first sign for some Democratic observers that DeVos had political traction. Donnelly and his fellow Democratic senators up for reelection in 2018 have seized on that energy with a salvo of emails soliciting small-dollar online donations.
— DeVos played foil for Montana Sen. Jon Tester when he solicited donations in May for himself and Rob Quist, the Democrat who was defeated in a special election for Montana’s at-large House seat. DeVos’ family “is spending big to influence tomorrow’s election,” Tester wrote in one email after the DeVoses donated to Greg Gianforte’s campaign.
—“For a lot of people, Betsy DeVos has really come to be a symbol of everything that’s wrong with Trump’s approach to government,” said Stephanie Grasmick, a partner at the Democratic digital consulting firm Rising Tide Interactive. DeVos is a prime example of Rising Tide’s new use of “social listening tools,” adopted for this election cycle, that monitor the web for trends. The technology is used by corporations but has yet to be fully embraced by political campaigns.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ahc

 

Is California’s big investment in needy students paying off? Few signs yet that achievement gap is closing
(Anaheim, CA) Orange County Register

California’s new system for funding public education has pumped tens of billions of extra dollars into struggling schools, but there’s little evidence yet that the investment is helping the most disadvantaged students.
A CALmatters analysis of the biggest districts with the greatest clusters of needy children found limited success with the policy’s goal: to close the achievement gap between these students and their more-privileged peers. Instead, test scores in most of those districts show the gap is growing.
The test scores echo a broader and growing concern about the Local Control Funding Formula from civil rights groups, researchers and legislators.
The formula implemented in 2013 sends more money to schools with higher concentrations of foster youths, kids learning English and students from low-income families. But four years after it was adopted, there are few signs the program is working, and questions have arisen about whether the $31 billion invested so far is being spent effectively.
The concern has created a high-stakes confrontation with Gov. Jerry Brown, the formula’s architect, because his goal of shifting more responsibility to the local level means the state does not track basic information, such as how much grant money each district gets for needy students and how they spend it.
http://gousoe.uen.org/agW

 

Oregon ranked best in country for educating homeless students
(Portland) Oregonian

Homeless children in Oregon have a better chance of succeeding in school than their counterparts in any other state, according to a new ranking released Friday.
The report by the New York City-based Institute for Children, Poverty and Homelessness found that Oregon ranked at the top when measuring how effectively school districts identify homeless children and enroll them in school. One area in which the state does especially well, the institute said, is its handling of homeless preschoolers.
It’s important for homeless students to be identified, the report says, so those students can be connected to resources and school districts can “ensure that homelessness does not disrupt their learning.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/agX

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/agY (Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness)

 

You Are What You Eat (at School): Report Shows Healthy School Lunches Tied to Higher Student Test Scores
(New York) The 74

Efforts to make school meals more nutritious have yielded noticeably positive results, according to a paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research. That progress, however, isn’t measured in lower obesity rates, but in improved academic performance.
The study collected data between 2008 and 2013 from roughly 9,700 California public schools, comparing the vast majority that prepare meals in-house to those that contract with outside vendors. Measuring the nutritional quality of the vendors’ meals against the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Healthy Eating Index, the authors found that students who ate healthy meals at school also scored slightly better on California’s STAR tests (then the state’s standardized examinations of annual student progress, which have since been replaced by another system).
“While this effect is small in magnitude, the relatively low cost of healthy vendors relative to in-house meal preparation makes this a very cost-effective way to raise test scores,” the authors write. Tallying the expense of schools spending more on healthier food, they estimate that an expanded program could achieve test score gains similar to those from Tennessee’s ballyhooed class-size-reduction experiment — all at less than one-sixth the cost ($222 versus $1,368 per student).
http://gousoe.uen.org/agZ

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/ah0 (National Bureau of Economic Research) $

 

Competition reward encourages students to study STEM
Washington Times

America’s scientific future may belong to a group of smiling middle-schoolers.
The nonprofit Chemical Educational Foundation on Monday brought together some of the nation’s brightest youngsters for its “You Be the Chemist National Challenge” at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C.
The tournament allowed 42 fifth- to eighth-graders to showcase their scientific knowledge in a format similar to that of a spelling bee.
“They aren’t asked what words to spell,” said Kurt Hetting, board member of the event and president of Superior Oil Co. “Instead they’re asked extremely difficult chemistry questions.”
The grand prize was certainly worth vying for.
“The champion receives a $12,000 educational scholarship,” said Emily Belson, senior manager of the foundation, which is based in Alexandria, Virginia.
http://gousoe.uen.org/agU

 

This New NASA Astronaut Has a Powerful Message for Girls in STEM
Fortune

NASA, it turns out, doesn’t leave voicemail messages.
When Kayla Barron, a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy, was waiting to hear whether NASA had selected her for its next class of astronaut candidates, she actually missed the selection committee’s first call.
“It was a horrifying experience,” she told Fortune. “It was the most important call of my life.”
Once Barron, 29, connected with NASA, she found out that the selection committee, after a rigorous, months-long evaluation process, had selected her as one of its 12 new recruits—from the biggest-ever pool of applicants: 18,300.
http://gousoe.uen.org/agV

 

Worried About Hackers? Call a Girl Scout
Education Week

The Girl Scouts of the USA will soon offer badges in cybersecurity for girls in grades K-12 as part of a growing national effort to bring technological skill and digital savvy to America’s school children.
“We recognize that in our increasingly tech-driven world, future generations must possess the skills to navigate the complexities and inherent challenges of the cyber realm,” Girl Scouts chief executive officer Sylvia Acevedo said in a statement.Girls-Scouts-historical-blog.jpg
“From arming our older girls with the tools to address this reality to helping younger girls protect their identities via internet safety, the launch of our national cybersecurity badge initiative represents our advocacy of cyber preparedness.”
The badges will cover everything from staying safe online and combatting cyberbullying to “the kinds of skills that cybersecurity experts need to combat theft, extortion, espionage, data manipulation, and other criminal acts,” Suzanne Harper, the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) strategy lead for Girl Scouts of the USA, said in a written response to questions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ah9

 

Kids and Guns: Shootings Now Third Leading Cause of Death for U.S. Children
Newsweek

Few stories are more heartbreaking than those involving children who are injured or killed by gunshots. It isn’t hard to find them: In June alone, a 6-year-old accidentally shot and killed a 4-year-old in South Carolina, a father accidentally shot and killed his 9-year-old daughter in Indiana and an 8-year-old Mississippi boy was accidentally shot in the chest. His grandparents drove him to the hospital, but he died 45 minutes later. Sadly, the list of child gun deaths goes on.
Though we constantly see examples in the news, child gun injuries and deaths may be even more prevalent in the United States than we realized. A study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics showed that an average of 5,790 children in the United States receive emergency room treatment for gun-related injuries each year, and around 21 percent of those injuries are unintentional. The study also found that an average of 1,297 children die annually from gun-related injuries, making guns the third-leading cause of death for children in America (behind illnesses and unintentional injuries like drownings or car crashes). The number is based on data taken from 2012–2014 for children up to the age of 17.
Data on fatal gun deaths were drawn from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Vital Statistics System database, and data on non-fatal gun injuries were from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.
Researchers found that 53 percent of the gun-related deaths were homicides, while 38 percent were suicides, 6 percent were unintentional and 3 percent were related to law enforcement or undetermined causes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aha

http://gousoe.uen.org/ahb ([Chicago] WBEZ)

 

How a Simple Writing Exercise in Middle School Led to Higher College Enrollment
Education Week

A little push at the right time can help move disadvantaged black and Latino students onto the path to college years later, according to two new experimental studies.
In several studies over the last decade, researchers led by Stanford University education psychologists J. Parker Goyer and Geoffrey Cohen randomly assigned some black, Latino, and white students to explore their values in a brief series of writing assignments in middle schools. In two recent follow-up studies of more than 500 students, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, the researchers say they found that Latino students who were assigned to the writing exercises at the beginning of middle school were more than five times as likely to enroll in a challenging college preparatory program in 8th grade. Black students, who were followed longer, were significantly more likely to both attend college and attend more-selective four-year colleges than their peers who did not participate in the writing exercise.
“For [disadvantaged] students, when you are feeling under threat, your sense of yourself is narrowed to that stereotype”—of, for example, minority students not performing as well academically, Goyer said. “Thinking about values can broaden that sense of self. It doesn’t have to be a formal intervention; teachers can be affirming to students every day.”
The intervention is one of a growing set of so-called “nudges,” low-cost, short-term interventions that prod students to make positive changes in their attitude or behavior. These interventions are intended to be small, but build effects over time.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ah7

 

Can These 11 States Make Their Teaching Forces More Diverse by 2040?
Education Week

Nationally, 18 percent of teachers are nonwhite, compared to just over half of public school students. It’s a large gap—but 11 states have committed to working to reach parity between their own nonwhite student and teacher populations by 2040.
The 11 states are: Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Missouri, Mississippi, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wisconsin. The state chiefs of education are working with the Council of Chief State School Officers, which is providing the team with support and resources, including help from researchers who study the issue of teacher diversity.
Saroja Warner, the director of educator preparation initiatives at CCSSO, said this work aligns with both CCSSO’s strategic plan and the Every Student Succeeds Act, which provides opportunities for states to prioritize building a diverse teacher workforce, including by allocating Title II funding to support districts’ recruiting efforts.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ah8

 

Haunted by a Player’s Death, a Coach Walks Away From His Sport
New York Times

HOMER, N.Y. — Jeff Charles, a former high school football coach, had tried to come to the football field here twice in recent years but could not bring himself to go farther than the parking lot. One day last week he made his way down the winding ramp from the parking lot and onto the turf.
He stopped just short of the 10-­yard line: “It happened down here,” Charles said, pointing toward midfield at the five-­yard line. Then he burst into tears.
Charles, 49, the former head varsity football coach at John C. Birdlebough High School in Phoenix, N.Y., was on the sideline here at Homer High School, about 30 miles south of Syracuse, on a Friday night in October 2011 when one of his players sustained a fatal brain injury. The death of Ridge Barden, a 16­-year-­old defensive tackle, hit both schools hard; eight busloads of Homer students attended Barden’s wake and funeral.
Charles had been coaching football for 21 years, but he said at the time that he wasn’t sure he would coach football again. Five and a half years later, Charles is, in fact, adrift from the sport.
http://gousoe.uen.org/agQ

 

Bosnian students keep up their protest against segregated schools
Reuters

TRAVNIK, BOSNIA | High school students and activists pressed their protest against ethnic segregation at schools in central Bosnia on Tuesday, after scoring an unprecedented victory against a government decision to further divide them along ethnic lines.
The Bosniak and Croat students succeeded in their year-long fight against the regional government, forcing it to reverse its decision to divide them into two separate, ethnically based schools in the town of Jajce.
Emboldened by their victory, the young people gathered on Tuesday before the government building in Travnik to request the abolition of other schools in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzeovina where Bosniak and Croats attend separate classes in the same building.
They held placards reading “Friendship under Embargo” and “Death to Politics, Freedom to Education”.
Following the war of the 1990s, Orthodox Serbs, Catholic Croats and Muslim Bosniaks represent so-called constituent people in Bosnia. In schools, each group has its own national curriculum and each is taught in the Serb, Croat or Bosnian language, although linguists say they are essentially one language.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ah6

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

June 20:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPPED

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
9:30 a.m., Basement West
http://schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

June 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

Government Operations Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 450 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002648.htm

Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Interim Committee meeting
1:15 p.m., 30 House Building
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002679.htm

Revenue and Taxation Interim Committee
1:15 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00002691.htm

July 13:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 14:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

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