Education News Roundup: June 23, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Cache and Logan teachers are getting a pay increase.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajl (LHJ)

Salt Lake hosts STEM Best Practices Conference.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aj7 (KSL)

For you CTE fans out there, the U.S. House reauthorized the Perkins Act.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajc (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aje ([Washington, DC] The Hill)
or a copy of the bill
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajd (Congress)

U.S. Senators reach across the aisle to promote a teacher leader bill.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aj8 (Ed Week)
or a copy of the bill
http://gousoe.uen.org/aj9 (Congress)

NPR follows up on a story from 13 years ago when a student entered kindergarten. He graduated from high school this year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajt (NRP)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Local school districts increase salaries; CCSD seeing more benefit from state laws

Covington named Murray School District Superintendent; Hirase retires

STEM Best Practices Conference attracts hundreds from all over the state

Does Minnesota lead the nation in per-pupil spending? Not anymore
A new report comparing school revenues and spending in each state shows how Minnesota stacks up

South Jordan students perform homemade opera

Utah teen sentenced to prison for bloody high school locker room attack that left five classmates injured
Luke Dollahite » Victims recount rampage; teen given 10-years-to-life sentence.

Is love triangle behind three bodies found in Caldwell, Idaho shed?

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Give Them What They Want

How can we prevent the next Philando Castile? Start by integrating our schools

NATION

House Passes Bill to Overhaul Career-Tech Education by Giving More Power to States

Republican and Democratic Senators Push Bill to Support Teacher Leaders

Big assignment for group of Colorado education leaders: rethink the state’s education priorities

Do charters or traditional schools have it worse? A new study says both

In Planning Lessons, Math Teachers Rely on What They Learned During Preservice

From training to recruitment to pay, teachers are the focus of NAACP education forum

Spanish Fort High AP reading list pulled after concerns from residents

New research: student well-being higher in diverse schools

Kids today: They don’t work summer jobs the way they used to

Big changes are coming to education, and some developed nations could get left behind
Developing nations may drive many of the upcoming changes to global education

Millions could escape poverty by finishing secondary education, says UN cultural agency

Turkey to stop teaching evolution theory in high schools: education board

How It All Turned Out: A Kindergarten Story, 13 Years Later

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UTAH NEWS
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Local school districts increase salaries; CCSD seeing more benefit from state laws

When the Utah legislature this year approved a 4 percent weighted pupil unit increase, school districts across the state took advantage of an opportunity to boost salaries, with several along the Wasatch Front increasing teacher starting pay above $40,000.
Locally, Cache County School District has approved a 5 percent cost of living adjustment across the board and has collapsed the first five years of step increases for beginning teachers at 5 percent above the previous fifth year salary, freezing any regular salary increases apart from any cost of living adjustments the district will make in coming years.

CCSD will also see significant benefits from property tax equalization measures, while LCSD won’t see as much additional funding.
Hansen said SB 93, this year’s property tax equalization law, guarantees that each school district receives a certain amount of funding per student through the WPU. Most of that funding comes from local property tax, but the state provides subsidies to help districts reach the minimum guarantee.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajl (LHJ)

 

Covington named Murray School District Superintendent; Hirase retires

The candy dish filled with Hot Tamales and M&Ms will soon be replaced by pure chocolate July 1 as Hillcrest Junior High Principal Jennifer Covington assumes the duties of Murray School District superintendent July 1.
Current Superintendent Steve Hirase will retire after seven years in the position and 38 years in education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajG (Murray Journal)

 

STEM Best Practices Conference attracts hundreds from all over the state

SALT LAKE CITY — Almost 700 educators, administrators and industry officials gathered at the Utah Valley Convention Center for the third annual STEM Best Practices Conference.
Dina Wise, a principal at Bruin Point Elementary, traveled from Carbon County to attend. “I’m the administrator at a rural school. My student population is 110 with an 80 percent poverty rate,” Wise said.
Wise brought three of her teachers to the conference to explore how STEM could be integrated at the school. “My students don’t get exposed to a lot of things,” she said. “A lot of my students don’t have technology in their home.”
Others at the conference were like Wise, exploring STEM and how it could be implemented at the school. The conference included five tracks: student engagement, leadership/mentoring, hands-on learning, cross-curricular connections and technology integration.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aj7 (KSL)

 

Does Minnesota lead the nation in per-pupil spending? Not anymore
A new report comparing school revenues and spending in each state shows how Minnesota stacks up

Minnesota has held one consistent spot on a national education ranking in recent years — it’s just nowhere near the top or the bottom.
Like Goldilocks, the state has not strayed too far from the middle for its annual per pupil spending. A newly released U.S. Census Bureau report listed Minnesota at No. 18 for its 2015 spending.
Minnesota’s $11,949 per pupil spending was above the national average, but well below the $21,000 spent on students in New York and nearly double the $6,575 spent by Utah.
“We have been middle of the pack for quite some time,” Scott Croonquist, executive director of the Association of Metropolitan School Districts, said. “The perception that we are one of the higher ranked states is an artifact of a bygone era.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajH (Minneapolis Star-Tribune)

 

South Jordan students perform homemade opera

SOUTH JORDAN — Seven-year-old Pamela Lloyd was ecstatic when she moved from Arizona to South Jordan to attend third grade, especially after she found out her South Jordan Elementary School class would be writing, producing and performing an opera.
“I love acting and singing. It’s like my favorite thing to do when I have spare time,” she said.
Pamela played the part of a vampire in her class production of “The Invasion,” which her third-grade class spent the entire school year working on and performed Thursday.
The class told the story of zombies, mummies, humans, vampires, aliens and robots overcoming their differences and working together through songs, colorful hand-crafted backdrops and handmade costumes.
The production was part of a Logan-based program called Opera by Children.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajj (DN)

 

Utah teen sentenced to prison for bloody high school locker room attack that left five classmates injured
Luke Dollahite » Victims recount rampage; teen given 10-years-to-life sentence.

Provo • On the day he was sentenced to prison for violently attacking five of his classmates in a high school locker room, 16-year-old Luke Dollahite offered a simple apology.
He was sorry, he said, to the five teen boys he made his victims. Sorry to his own family. Sorry to his community.
“The mercy I’ve been shown,” he said Thursday, “I don’t deserve any of it.”
Dollahite was sentenced 10 years to life in Utah State Prison for the Nov. 15 rampage — in which he attacked one student with a wooden staff, then stabbed four others before stabbing himself in a locker room at Mountain View High School.
In April, he admitted to four counts of attempted murder in juvenile court and pleaded guilty to a fifth charge in the adult court system. Thursday’s sentencing marked the end of Dollahite’s criminal court case — but the victims and their families told the judge that they have not entirely healed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajh (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aji (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/ajk (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/ajp (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/ajq (DN via KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/ajr (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/ajI (AP)

 

Is love triangle behind three bodies found in Caldwell, Idaho shed?

Ogden, Utah —Payton Medley, 14, loved Mike Bullinger so much, she called him dad. Which made sense because her mom, Nadja Medley was engaged to marry him, according to one of Payton’s best friends.
Bethany Cagle, 15, said she was stunned when she read reports that Bullinger was a person of interest in connection with the shooting death of her friend Payton and her mother. She was even more stunned when she read that there was a third woman — Cheryl Baker — a woman who is reported to be Bullinger’s wife.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajn (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/ajs (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aju (MUR)

http://gousoe.uen.org/ajo ([Boise] Idaho Statesman )

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Give Them What They Want
Cache Valley Daily op-ed by Paul Mero, President & CEO of Next Generation Freedom Fund

Okay, let me sound like the conservative heretic I am often accused of being: Conservatives should let the Our Schools Now initiative run its course. Don’t oppose it. To publicly and vociferously oppose the Our Schools Now initiative, Utah conservatives will look stupid, sound stupid and most certainly act stupid. The reason is simple: Utah conservatives, by and large, don’t understand the playing field in Utah education. They emphasize what doesn’t matter at the expense of what really does.
We ignore the most important lesson of the 2007 voucher fight: Policy cannot get ahead of culture. First, Utah conservatives are enamored and obsessed with school choice. Just like the argument that “it’s not how much money you spend that matters; it’s how you spend it,” it’s not a choice that matters, it’s the choice that matters. And, frankly, Utah parents have all the choices they need. They can send their kids to public school. They can send their kids to a public charter school. They can send their kids to a private school. They can home school. They can do online schooling. Choice exists. What doesn’t always exist is a parent either willing or in a position to make the best choices for their child. The key to a good education is an attentive parent and that’s the starting point for a successful culture of education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajm

 

How can we prevent the next Philando Castile? Start by integrating our schools
Los Angeles Times commentary by columnist Cassady Rosenblum

The first time I saw my students ball their fists and lunge at each other, I hurled my body across the room, smashing the buzzer on the wall for security — something I would do many times during my first year of teaching 10th grade in post-Katrina New Orleans.
“Stop it this second, both of you!” I screamed as they spat insults at each other.
My students, 95% of whom were black while I am white, looked at me blankly for a second then burst out laughing. “Ms. Rosenblum, we were just playing!” they wailed, eyes still watering as they took their seats, best of friends once more.
In the hall the security guard stared at me, eyebrows raised. “Sorry,” I mouthed. “I thought they were fighting.”
In the days since Jeronimo Yanez walked free, I can’t stop thinking about how I would have reacted had I been in his shoes and encountered a black man with a gun. With every particle of my being, I hope differently. But realistically, I frequently misread my students’ behavior when I was a teacher, just like Castile’s girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds, alleges Yanez, who is Latino, misread Castile’s.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajg

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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House Passes Bill to Overhaul Career-Tech Education by Giving More Power to States
Education Week

The House passed a reauthorization of the federal law governing career and technical education programs on Wednesday, but how exactly it will mesh with other workforce development efforts afoot in Washington remains to be seen.
Lawmakers backed H.R. 2353, the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act, which would overhaul the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act. Like the Every Student Succeeds Act, it gives more decision-making and funding authority to states. The bill’s lead co-authors are Rep. Glenn Thompson, R-Pa., and Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, D-Ill.
Among other things, the bill would allow states to set aside money for their own competitive-grant or other funding streams for CTE, and increase the permitted share of federal aid states could set aside for their own use from 10 percent under current law to 15 percent. It also is designed to better connect education in local communities to their respective local labor market, and changes the definition of which students are counted as “concentrators” in career and technical education programs. (That last provision has caused some heartburn among CTE advocates who think it’s overly broad, although it hasn’t significantly hampered the legislation.)
The Perkins Act hasn’t been reauthorized since 2006.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajc

http://gousoe.uen.org/aje ([Washington, DC] The Hill)

A copy of the bill
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajd (Congress)

 

Republican and Democratic Senators Push Bill to Support Teacher Leaders
Education Week

A bipartisan group of senators today introduced a bill aimed at giving teachers more opportunities to take on leadership roles without having to leave the classroom.
The Teachers Are Leaders Act, sponsored by U.S. Senators Chris Coons (D-Del.), Joni Ernst (R-Iowa), Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), and Jack Reed (D-R.I.), would allow existing teacher-quality grants under the Higher Education Act to be used for creating teacher leadership development programs. High-need schools and colleges of education would partner to come up with innovative roles for teachers who want to advance their careers without leaving the classroom completely. Those roles might include peer coaching, curriculum writing, working on school discipline and culture, or engaging with families and communities.
Under the bill, the funds would also support professional development for teacher leaders.
“The Teachers Are Leaders Act recognizes that teachers continue to develop beyond their first years of teaching and should be prepared to follow differentiated career paths that foster new opportunities for professional growth, increase their voice in school decisions, and improve student achievement,” the bill summary states.
A host or education organizations support the bill, including the Alliance for Excellence in Education, the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, the National Association of Elementary School Principals, the National Education Association, and Teach Plus.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aj8

A copy of the bill
http://gousoe.uen.org/aj9 (Congress)

 

Big assignment for group of Colorado education leaders: rethink the state’s education priorities
Chalkbeat

A newly constituted group of educators, lawmakers and state officials led by Lt. Gov. Donna Lynne will be charged with creating a sweeping new strategic plan for education in Colorado.
Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper signed an executive order this week giving that task to a reconstituted Education Leadership Council, which formed in 2011 but has become inactive.
The new-look council will identify statewide priorities for how to better educate the state’s children so they can contribute to Colorado’s workforce, according to the order.
In an interview Thursday with Chalkbeat, Lynne said she expects the plan to include recommendations for how the governor’s office, relevant state departments, the legislature or others can work toward the state’s goals.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajf

 

Do charters or traditional schools have it worse? A new study says both
Los Angeles Times

Charter schools remain a subject of intense debate in Los Angeles, especially with the arrival soon of two new school board members who were supported by charter backers.
While research on charters often is inconclusive and partisan, a study released this week has ammunition for both their enthusiasts and their critics.
The research commissioned by a coalition of educational and philanthropic organizations focused on charter schools in Oakland. It determined that they have received less public funding than Oakland’s traditional public schools, but that traditional schools have had a more challenging student population to educate.
Charters are privately operated public schools that are exempt from some rules that govern traditional campuses. Most are non-union, and in California most are run by nonprofits. L.A. Unified has more charter students than any other school system, about 16% of total enrollment. Oakland is a much smaller district, and 30% of its students are in charters.
A central finding of the study supports charter operators’ longtime claim that they get less money. Despite serving similar percentages of low-income students and students learning English, Oakland charters received about $2,800 less in public funding per student.
Charter critics, however, can point to other study conclusions:
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajE

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajF (Go Public Schools Oakland)

 

In Planning Lessons, Math Teachers Rely on What They Learned During Preservice
Education Week

Elementary math teachers remember what they learn in their teacher preparation programs, and use it when writing lesson plans years down the road, according to a study published in the American Educational Research Journal.
In fact, the more time teachers spent on a particular math concept in their preservice program, the more likely they are to use that concept in preparing lessons—even when they’re doing so six years later.
Given the scrutiny teacher-prep programs have undergone in recent years, the finding that graduates truly do rely on what they learn in these programs—and that they continue doing so over time—is worth highlighting.
Though small in scale, the study opens up a new avenue for researching the impact of teacher preparation.
Previous research by the National Council on Teacher Quality found that teacher education programs are not adequately preparing new teachers. But those reports relied on analyses of the programs’ syllabuses, student-teaching manuals, and course textbooks, rather than checking in with graduates. And NCTQ has come under fire for its methodology.
Other recent efforts to judge the effectiveness of teacher education programs have focused on linking student test scores to graduates.
The recent study takes a new tack: looking at teacher lesson plans.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aja

 

From training to recruitment to pay, teachers are the focus of NAACP education forum
Charleston (SC) Post and Courier

Superintendent Gerrita Postlewait opened the spring edition of Diversity in Ed, a teacher recruitment magazine, and pointed out an advertisement meant to entice new hires. “Teach in Charleston” read the full-page ad, beneath a photo of kids grinning with their teacher in a local classroom.
On the opposite page, a school district in a Dallas suburb made a more enticing offer: “Starting Teacher Salary $51,500.”
Starting pay in Charleston? Just over $36,000.
“We have to improve the way we treat people in the profession, both inside the system and outside the system, so that we can attract more people to it. I think we have to think differently about the way we pay teachers,” Postlewait said.
The district has not announced any specific plans to raise teacher pay except in a handful of “Top Talent” schools where recruiting has proven especially difficult. Postlewait was mainly interested in gathering input Thursday night at the Charleston Branch NAACP’s education town hall, hosted at Morris Brown AME Church.
About 30 people attended. They raised questions about improving teacher certification, increasing parent involvement, expanding access to early childhood education, desegregating schools and training teachers to work in diverse environments through professional development.
“We need to pay them more and train them more and treat them like the professionals they are,” said George Tempel.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajw

 

Spanish Fort High AP reading list pulled after concerns from residents
(Foley, AL) Gulf Coast News Today

Concerns from local residents have led to a summer reading list for a Spanish Fort High School AP Government/Economics being pulled.
Spanish Fort High teacher Gene Ponder’s summer reading list for his class included a number of texts from a majority of conservative and right-leaning authors including Ann Coulter, Michael Savage, Ron Paul, Thomas Sowell, Chuck Colson and Ronald Reagan.
Some of the titles of the books included “Trickle Up Poverty: Stopping Obama’s Attacks on Our Borders, Economy and Security,” “Liberty and Tyranny: A Conservative Manifesto,” “48 Liberal Lies About American History,” “Guilty: Liberal ‘Victims’ and Their Assault on America,” “Liberalism is a Mental Disorder,” and “The Land of Fair Play: American Civics from a Christian Perspective,” to name a few.
Ponder had previously been a Republican candidate for Alabama’s lieutenant governorship back in 2010.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajb

 

New research: student well-being higher in diverse schools
(Pasadena, CA) KPCC

A study by University of California Los Angeles researchers published in the journal Child Development on Tuesday finds that students who attend more racially- and ethnically-diverse schools report less vulnerability, loneliness, insecurity and bullying.
“There’s more of a balance of power in these diverse schools,” said report co-author Sandra Graham.
The study polled nearly 6,000 sixth graders in 26 middle schools, mostly in Los Angeles County. The student population of 11 of the schools was dominated by one ethnic or racial group. In nine of the schools, two ethnic or racial groups made up most of the student body, and in six of the schools the student population was composed of several ethnic or racial groups in roughly equal proportions.
In the more diverse schools, “kids have more opportunity to have cross-race friendships and then they become protective,” Graham said. “So if you’re in a diverse school and you’ve made friends with people from different racial and ethnic groups then they help protect you, they help introduce you to kids in their ethnic, racial group, there’s more opportunities to find your niche and fit in.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajz

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajA (Child Development)

 

Kids today: They don’t work summer jobs the way they used to
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — It was at Oregon’s Timberline Lodge, later known as a setting in the horror movie “The Shining,” where Patrick Doyle earned his first real paycheck.
He was a busboy. The job didn’t pay much. But Doyle quickly learned lessons that served him for years as he rose to become the CEO of Domino’s, the pizza delivery giant:
Show up on time, dress properly, treat customers well.
“I grew up a lot that summer,” he says.
As summer 2017 begins, America’s teenagers are far less likely to be acquiring the kinds of experiences Doyle found so useful. Once a teenage rite of passage, the summer job is vanishing.
Once a teenage rite of passage, the summer job is vanishing. According to the Department of Labor, just 36 percent of Americans aged 16-to-19 worked last July, down from nearly 57 percent in July 1986. (June 23)
Instead of baling hay, scooping ice cream or stocking supermarket shelves in July and August, today’s teens are more likely to be enrolled in summer school, doing volunteer work to burnish their college credentials or just hanging out with friends.
For many, not working is a choice. For some others, it reflects a lack of opportunities where they live, often in lower-income urban areas: They sometimes find that older workers hold the low-skill jobs that once would have been available to them.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajx

Sidebar: Tips for teens
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajy (AP)

 

Big changes are coming to education, and some developed nations could get left behind
Developing nations may drive many of the upcoming changes to global education
CNBC

For centuries, innovation in education has been led by powerful and influential countries.
That could be set to change, however, with today’s developing nations primed to lead the charge.
“It is likely that we could see the transformation of education systems occurring first in developing countries,” said William Altman, tech industry analyst at CB Insights.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajB

 

Millions could escape poverty by finishing secondary education, says UN cultural agency
U.N. News Centre

While a new United Nations study shows that the global poverty rate could be more than halved if all adults completed secondary school, data show high out-of-school rates in many countries, making it likely that education completion levels will remain well below that target for generations.
“The new analysis on education’s far-reaching benefits released today should be good news for all those working on the Sustainable Development Goal to eradicate poverty by 2030,” said Irina Bokova, Director-General of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).
“It shows that we have a concrete plan to ensure people no longer have to live on barely a few dollars a day, and that plan has education at its heart,” she added.
Based on the effects that education had on growth and poverty reduction in developing countries from 1965 to 2010, the new analysis by UNESCO’s Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Report team, shows that nearly 60 million people could escape poverty if all adults had just two more years of schooling.
“If all adults completed secondary education, 420 million could be lifted out of poverty, reducing the total number of poor people by more than half globally and by almost two-thirds in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia,” according to UNESCO.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajD

 

Turkey to stop teaching evolution theory in high schools: education board
Reuters

ANKARA | Turkey is to stop teaching Darwin’s theory of evolution in high schools, deeming it controversial and difficult to understand, a senior education official said, a move likely to alarm secular Turks.
Critics say President Tayyip Erdogan and the Islamist-rooted AK Party are undermining modern Turkey’s secular foundations by pushing a conservative agenda, including tighter regulation of alcohol and other restrictions, since coming to power in 2002.
A chapter entitled “Beginning of Life and Evolution” will be deleted from the standard biology textbooks used in schools and the material will be available only to students who go on to university studies from age 18 or 19, Alparslan Durmus, head of the national education board said in an online address this week.
“We are aware that if our students don’t have the background to comprehend the premises and hypotheses, or if they don’t have the knowledge and scientific framework, they will not be able to understand some controversial issues, so we have left out some of them,” he said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajv

http://gousoe.uen.org/ajC ([London] Telegraph)

 

How It All Turned Out: A Kindergarten Story, 13 Years Later
NPR

Today we’re going to update a story we first brought you back in 2004. That September, NPR set out to document what may be the most important day in any young child’s life — the first day of kindergarten. For parents it’s a day filled with hope, anxiety and one big question: Is our child ready?
The answer back then, as far as 5-year-old Sam Marsenison was concerned, was “No, no, no!”
For his parents, Paul and Maryanna Marsenison of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., it was tough letting go too. They had spent weeks, if not months, preparing themselves. But on that day, Sam made it very clear that he wanted no part of his new school, Virginia Shuman Young Elementary.
Sam lunged towards Maryanna and wrapped his little arms around her waist, tears rolling down both their faces.
In the background, the principal was on the PA system with a not-so-subtle warning: It was time for all kindergarten parents to leave. Immediately.
And now it was Maryanna, not Sam, who didn’t want to let go. For a while it seemed that even a tractor couldn’t pull her away.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ajt

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

July 13:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 14:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

July 26:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

August 23:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

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