Education News Roundup: June 29, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Spectrum takes a look at the recent Census report on per-pupil funding in the U.S.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amB (SGS)
or a copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/amC (Census)

Elaine Clark named dean of the U’s College of Education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amS (Newswise)
http://gousoe.uen.org/amU (U)

U.S. Department of Ed gives states more time on financial transparency.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amJ (Ed Week)
or a copy of the letter
http://gousoe.uen.org/amK (ED)

Parents in the United States spend an average of $58,464 on their child’s education … before they reach university, according to a new study from British banking giant HSBC.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amN ([London] Independent)
or a copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/amQ (HSBC)

————————————————————
TODAY’S HEADLINES
————————————————————

UTAH

Bad news for Utah’s K-12 kids: We’re worst in the nation, again, for funding them

Anti-pornography advocates want open conversation in sex education

University of Utah Names New Dean for College of Education
Elaine Clark, professor of educational psychology at the U, begins July 1

Tests clear seven more homes from PCE threat near East High, but exact location of tainted groundwater still a mystery

Stewart launches refugee back-to-school drive

Join Kane Education Foundation in the Fourth of July Color Run

Utah middle schoolers write letters to Gordon Hayward asking him to stay with the Jazz

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Partisan school board elections just one more step toward total GOP domination in Utah

Another Sign of Retreat on Civil Rights

NATION

Trump Ed. Dept. Gives States, Districts Extra Time on ESSA Financial Transparency Requirement

Chan-Zuckerberg to Push Ambitious New Vision for Personalized Learning
Former deputy secretary of education to head expanded initiative

U.S. high court voids N.M. ruling on textbook funding

New Guidelines for Teaching Religion in Schools

GM partners with 4 groups to boost STEM education

Student Privacy in Education Research: ‘It’s Time’ to Update Federal Laws

School Board Decisions Spur Onondaga Nation Protest

Value of Education: UK and US Parents in Top-ten Counties that Think University Offers Poor Value for Money, HSBC Survey Finds
Taiwan leads the way as Canada and France also make it into the chart

 

————————————————————
UTAH NEWS
————————————————————

Bad news for Utah’s K-12 kids: We’re worst in the nation, again, for funding them

As has been the case for every year since 1988, Utah spends less than any other state on its per-pupil education funding.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s annual state education report, Utah spent $6,575 per pupil in the 2014-15 school year.
That’s just a $75 increase from the year prior. Lincoln Nehring, CEO of Voices for Utah Children, says that’s not nearly enough.
“Every legislator I have talked to supports finding additional resources for our schools,” Nehring said. “I think there are few that have been able to articulate a plan to make that happen.”
Utah and Idaho have battled each other to get out of last place in recent years, and the gap between the two western states grew during the 2015 year to $348 per pupil. To overcome that, the state would have had to allot an additional $216 million to the education budget.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amB (SGS)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/amC (Census)

 

Anti-pornography advocates want open conversation in sex education

Much of the talk involved the relationship between husbands and wives at a recent anti-pornography conference in Salt Lake City, but there was another link in the conversation: children.
Jeremy Boberg, social worker and owner of Utah Addiction Centers, said the fight with pornography isn’t just about the relationship between husband and wife. He said it may never have only been about the adults in a home.
“What we’re seeing right now, the pornographers – they’ll openly admit it – they’re marketing to eight-year-olds,” Boberg said.
Boberg said pornographers hope to hook children early using child porn and video games. He said all someone has to do to access pornographic images is to simply visit a gaming website, and by the time these children are adults, they’re already addicted.
“This is an issue of – especially when it comes to the children – of creating new neural pathways in the brain that that child’s brain is not ready to handle,” Boberg said.
He said the pornography epidemic isn’t only confined to the commercial market, but he said he believes producers are trying to break their way into the school curriculum.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amR (BYU Universe)

 

University of Utah Names New Dean for College of Education
Elaine Clark, professor of educational psychology at the U, begins July 1

The University of Utah announced that Elaine Clark, professor of educational psychology at the U, has accepted the appointment as the new dean of the College of Education. For a seamless transition, Clark will begin July 1 as the current dean, María Fránquiz, moves to her new position as deputy chief academic officer for Faculty Development and Innovation.
“I am honored to have this unique opportunity to work with the outstanding faculty and staff in the college,” said Clark. “The College of Education is a significant contributor to ensuring that all children with varied backgrounds, needs and abilities have access to a high-quality education, including one that provides effective academic, social, emotional and mental health supports.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/amS (Newswise)

http://gousoe.uen.org/amU (U)

 

Tests clear seven more homes from PCE threat near East High, but exact location of tainted groundwater still a mystery

Seven additional homes near East High School are in the clear as the search continues for a harmful pollutant that may infiltrate residents’ basements.
The houses were tested this spring for a chemical called tetrachloroethylene, or PCE, that has been detected in wells and springs in the surrounding area. Scientists are working to identify the exact location of the contaminated groundwater, but said Wednesday they were relieved to see that the data collected so far indicate the problem is not widespread.
PCE is a synthetic chemical used by dry cleaners and other industrial operations. But when groundwater becomes contaminated by PCE, the chemical can be released as a gas and accumulate in nearby basements.
In high concentrations, PCE is linked to eye and respiratory irritation, kidney dysfunction and neurological effects such as behavioral changes, impaired coordination, dizziness, headaches and fatigue, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.
PCE also is a likely carcinogen, the EPA warns.
Federal officials believe the contaminated groundwater near East High originated from a Department of Veterans Affairs dry cleaning operation at the George E. Wahlen VA Medical Center in the 1970s.

Two nearby parochial schools, Judge Memorial Catholic High School and Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic School, have tested positive for PCE gas, though neither topped the screening level. East High itself had a negative test result.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amy (SLT)

 

Stewart launches refugee back-to-school drive

SALT LAKE CITY – Rep. Chris Stewart, R-Utah, has launched a drive to collect school supplies for refugee children living in Utah. Donations can be mailed or dropped off to Stewart’s Salt Lake and St. George offices through Aug. 11.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amA (DN)

 

Join Kane Education Foundation in the Fourth of July Color Run

Kane Education Foundation is organizing the Fourth of July Color Run, and we invite you to join us! Color Run registration is from 6:15 to 6:45 a.m. on July 4 at 20 W. Center Street. Registration fees are $5 per person or $20 per family. Additional donations are certainly welcome! All proceeds from this event will benefit Kane County Schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amT (Southern Utah News)

 

Utah middle schoolers write letters to Gordon Hayward asking him to stay with the Jazz

Utah youngsters really want Gordon Hayward to stay with the Utah Jazz.
Students at Tooele Junior High School have written a bunch of letters to Hayward, asking him to re-sign with the Jazz and not leave the Utah basketball franchise behind.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amz (DN)

 

————————————————————
OPINION & COMMENTARY
————————————————————

Partisan school board elections just one more step toward total GOP domination in Utah
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist PAUL ROLLY

A lawsuit filed this week to negate the new partisan state school board elections is a reminder of the Utah Legislature’s systematic attempts at partisan cleansing.
Lawmakers’ history of gerrymandering to ensure Republicans win a high percentage of legislative and congressional seats is one way they’ve stacked the deck.
Then they attempted to remove the requirement that most state advisory boards and commissions have a bipartisan blend of Republicans and Democrats, which would have made it possible that only Republicans would be appointed to advise Republican elected officials.
Add to that the law, which takes effect next year, to have partisan elections for the Utah Board of Education.
The message becomes clear: The already-dominant GOP Legislature wants to erase Democrats and independents from having any voice in policymaking in the Beehive State.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amx

 

Another Sign of Retreat on Civil Rights
New York Times editorial

Civil rights organizations and some members of Congress are troubled by the Trump administration’s rollback of civil rights enforcement generally, but they are particularly worried by what is going on at the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights. The office has played a crucial role in protecting the rights of transgender students and victims of sexual assault and especially in forcing school districts to abandon disciplinary policies that unfairly single out minority children for suspension and expulsion.
This issue came to the fore this month when the acting assistant secretary for civil rights, Candice Jackson, sent a memo to the office’s regional directors backing away from a policy that requires investigators to look for systemic problems – and whole classes of victims – when civil rights complaints emerge. The department says the new policy will expedite investigations, but critics rightly argue that it could discourage the staff from opening cases at all.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amw

 

————————————————————-
NATIONAL NEWS
————————————————————-

Trump Ed. Dept. Gives States, Districts Extra Time on ESSA Financial Transparency Requirement
Education Week

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and her team are giving states and districts an extra year to comply with new financial transparency requirements in the Every Student Succeeds that are aimed at shining a light on how much schools spend on each student. And at least one key civil rights group is unhappy about the delay.
ESSA calls for states to report per-pupil expenditures for all their schools on school report cards for the first time beginning in the 2017-18 school year. The requirement was intended in part to help local policymakers-and the public-figure out if there are significant spending disparities between schools that serve high percentages of poor kids and other schools, and whether schools that lag behind in student achievement are getting as much money as more successful schools.
When ESSA passed, civil rights advocates were excited about the new transparency around per-pupil spending. But school superintendents and state leaders warned that providing that sort of detailed data on such a tight timeline could be a tough lift. The Education Department is giving states until the 2018-19 school year to begin putting the per-pupil expenditure information on their report cards.
Jason Botel, who is serving as the acting assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education, told state chiefs in a June 28 letter that, if they’re ready to start including the information sooner, they should go ahead and do so in the 2017-18 school year. States that aren’t should instead use their report cards to explain how they plan to meet the requirement next year, Botel said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amJ

A copy of the letter
http://gousoe.uen.org/amK (ED)

 

Chan-Zuckerberg to Push Ambitious New Vision for Personalized Learning
Former deputy secretary of education to head expanded initiative
Education Week

Pediatrician Priscilla Chan and Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg are gearing up to invest hundreds of millions of dollars a year in a new vision of “whole-child personalized learning,” with the aim of dramatically expanding the scope and scale of efforts to provide every student with a customized education.
The emerging strategy represents a high-stakes effort to bridge longstanding divides between competing visions for improving the nation’s schools. Through their recently established Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, the billionaire couple intends to support the development of software that might help teachers better recognize and respond to each student’s academic needs-while also supporting a holistic approach to nurturing children’s social, emotional, and physical development.
The man charged with marrying those two philosophies is former Deputy U.S. Secretary of Education James H. Shelton, now the initiative’s president of education.
“We’ve got to dispel this notion that personalized learning is just about technology,” Shelton said in an exclusive interview with Education Week. “In fact, it is about understanding students, giving them agency, and letting them do work that is engaging and exciting.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/amL

 

U.S. high court voids N.M. ruling on textbook funding
(Santa Fe) New Mexican

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday ordered New Mexico’s highest court to reconsider whether state money can be used to pay for textbooks at religious and other private schools.
In ordering the reconsideration, the justices vacated a 2015 decision by the state Supreme Court, which ruled that providing public funds for textbooks in private schools violated the New Mexico Constitution. The constitution prohibits education funds from being “used for the support of any sectarian, denominational or private school, college or university.”
The U.S. Supreme Court order in the New Mexico case came a day after the justices ruled that the state of Missouri could not deny a grant to a church for playground improvements simply because it was a religious institution. The Supreme Court cited its ruling in that case in directing New Mexico’s justices to revisit the textbook issue.
Prior to the New Mexico Supreme Court ruling in the textbook case, the state was providing more than $1 million a year for textbooks in private schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amG

 

New Guidelines for Teaching Religion in Schools
Education Week

Have you ever met a person who studied religious studies in college or as a graduate student? They often find themselves in the position of explaining why, despite their degree, they are not preparing to be a pastor, or a rabbi, or another sort of religious leader. Rather, they studied religions from an academic perspective.
In K-12 schools, there is similar unfamiliarity with the idea of studying religions from an academic point of view. As the regular flow of controversies over the Bible, the Quran, or yoga makes clear, things get dicey whenever religion or religion-adjacent subjects are brought up in public schools. And yet religion is connected to many academic subjects -think of history, art, and literature.
The National Council for the Social Studies recently introduced a new resource aimed at supporting and informing schools and teachers as they consider how to teach about religions. Earlier this month, the group added a section to its College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework on teaching about religion.
The basic approach: Teachers should encourage students to learn about religions, not to accept a particular religion, the framework says. Students should have the chance to study a religion and should be exposed to diverse religious views but not have one imposed upon them. And religion itself should not be promoted or denigrated.
The supplement includes some samples of questions in the discipline that might align with this approach.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amH

A copy of the framework
http://gousoe.uen.org/amI (National Council for the Social Studies)

 

GM partners with 4 groups to boost STEM education
Detroit News

General Motors Co. has partnered with four new organizations as part of its emerging corporate giving plan that includes a focus on encouraging young people to explore science, technology, engineering and math related professions.
The Detroit automaker said Wednesday it will give a total of $850,000 and has established new partnerships with Code.org, Black Girls Code, Institute of Play and Digital Promise.
GM says it is giving $200,000 to Code.org to help train 1,400 computer science teachers who will teach more than 40,000 U.S. students during the 2017-18 school year. GM will give $200,000 to help Black Girls Code to launch a Detroit-area chapter by this fall to expose underrepresented girls in the area to coding and technology; the group aims to boost the number of minority women in tech careers.
The automaker will help New York City-based Institute of Play by providing $200,000 to develop an eight-month professional development fellowship for middle and high school STEM teachers that will focus on using games, play and digital tools to change teacher practice and student engagement. It also will support research and creation of an online credential curriculum for teachers in computational thinking with a $250,000 grant to Digital Promise.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amu

http://gousoe.uen.org/amv (Fortune)

 

Student Privacy in Education Research: ‘It’s Time’ to Update Federal Laws
Education Week

The House education committee tried to restart the long-delayed updates of federal laws governing education research and student data privacy at a Wednesday morning hearing that showed the deep tension between districts’ need for strong, fast research and parents’ concerns about data security.
“Education research can be a powerful tool to help our students, but that information should not come at the cost of a student’s private and personal information,” said Rep. Todd Rokita, R-Ind., the chairman of the subcommittee on early childhood, elementary, and secondary education.
Recent attempts to update federal law on the issue have failed to make it through either the House or Senate. Rokita noted that the Education Sciences Reform Act has not been reauthorized since 2002, and the Federal Education Rights and Privacy Act has never been reauthorized since its creation in 1974. “Frankly, most of our staff were not alive at that point, and even some of our colleagues were not alive at that point. It’s time-it’s more than time” to reauthorize federal privacy law, said Rep. Glenn Thompson, R-Pa.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amM

 

School Board Decisions Spur Onondaga Nation Protest
New York Times

ONONDAGA NATION – On Thursday evening, after the last day of classes at the Onondaga Nation School here, students and families plan to gather at the Tsha’ Thoñ’nhes, or sports pavilion, to celebrate the eighth graders. There will be singing and dancing. Parents will give the eighth graders beaded necklaces signifying their clans and the younger students will give them presents.
While it will not be an official graduation ceremony, the families in the nation, south of Syracuse, hope to make it as festive as possible, to put an exclamation mark on the end of a year that is otherwise ending in uncertainty and discord.
Since June 16, most parents have kept their children home from school. They are protesting what they see as disrespectful actions by the local school board, which manages the school under a contract with the state but has no Onondaga representatives. The families say that they and the nation’s leadership have been excluded from decisions about hiring and budgeting.
The last straw, they say, was the board’s refusal to appoint an Onondaga teacher at the school to replace the current principal, who is retiring on Saturday.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amE

 

Value of Education: UK and US Parents in Top-ten Counties that Think University Offers Poor Value for Money, HSBC Survey Finds
Taiwan leads the way as Canada and France also make it into the chart
(London) Independent

The value of further education is not just being thrust into the spotlight here in the UK, but across the globe too.
Parents are slowly coming to the realisation their children are having more of tough time than they did – particularly here in the UK where tuition fees across England look set to rise and the maintenance grant will be no more as of September 2016.
An increasingly competitive job market means a standard undergraduate degree is being seen, by some, as not sufficient enough; young people are having to do more than ever, compared to their peers, if they want to stand out from the crowd and get noticed by prospective employers.
Postgraduate qualifications and studying abroad are ways to do this, but they can be costly and require intensive planning beforehand.
HSBC conducted a thorough survey into the true value of education across the world by gathering the views of 5,500 parents from 16 countries in its latest report into life-long learning.

The UK has joined Canada, America and France in the top-ten as being among those who say further education, in 2015, offers fairly or very poor value for money.
http://gousoe.uen.org/amN

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/amQ (HSBC)

 

————————————————————
CALENDAR
————————————————————

USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

July 13:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 14:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

July 26:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
Utah State Capitol Auditorium
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

August 23:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

Related posts:

Comments are closed.