Education News Roundup: July 10, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

ENR notes with sadness the passing of former Utah State Board of Education Chair Kim Burningham.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apq (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aps (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/apA (DCC)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/apy (KTVX)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/apz (KSTU)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/apr (SLT obituary)

Our Schools Now will be holding regional meetings Tuesday on its ballot initiative.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aph (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/apL (SGS)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/apw (SGN)

New York Times looks at how Secretary DeVos is handling state ESSA plans.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apo (NYT)

Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai graduates from high school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apB (NYT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/apK (Parade Magazine)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Kim Burningham dies: Champion of public education, ethics and political moderation
Obituary » He was never afraid to fight for his principles, regardless of political pressure or consequences.

Our Schools Now to hold public meetings across Utah Tuesday on $700M tax hike initiative
Our Schools Now » Utahns are invited to ask about effort meant to boost education funding.

UEA President Heidi Mathews Working to Increase State Education Funding

Public hearing to be held on juvenile detention admission guidelines

Former Park City High School principal settles lawsuit with district
Terms were not disclosed, but Hilary Hays sought $910,000 in damages after firing

Doug Wright named new Monticello City Manager

People on the Move

Champions Challenge Rodeo partners with Nebo student readers

Salvation Army opens annual Back to School drive

This Abandoned Utah High School Was Once A Utah Icon – But It Will Soon Be Gone

Sports Field Holdings, Inc. Awarded New Crimson High School Athletic Field In St. George, Utah

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Sutherland Comments on Utah’s ESSA Consolidated Plan

NATION

DeVos’s Hard Line on New Education Law Surprises States

Why the Long Arc of School-Choice Research May Bend Toward Vouchers
A new study from Louisiana shows test-score improvement among voucher recipients.

Schuette: Schools can’t lose state of Michigan funding for American Indian mascots

How Accessible Is Gifted Education in Your State?

Expert: NM teacher evals are toughest in the nation

Want Principals to Rate Teachers Honestly? Take Away the Stakes.

Just 20 Percent of K-12 Students Are Learning a Foreign Language

Catholic church eyes ‘game-changing’ school choice plan

What Makes a Teacher of the Year Run for Political Office?

Barred from the boys’ bathroom, a transgender teen sues a Florida school board

Should Students Be Taught How to Deal With Police?

Malala Yousafzai, Girls’ Education Advocate, Finishes High School

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Kim Burningham dies: Champion of public education, ethics and political moderation
Obituary » He was never afraid to fight for his principles, regardless of political pressure or consequences.

Kim Burningham stood on the floor of the Utah House during a debate about education funding in the 1980s and proudly acknowledged being a nerd.
“When I was a kid, my peers would fantasize about being baseball players or basketball players,” he said. “But I would sit in my bedroom with props representing students and pretend to be a schoolteacher.”
He fulfilled that dream, spending 27 years as one of Bountiful High School’s most beloved teachers as speech and debate coach and school play director.
Burningham, who died Friday at age 80 from liver cancer, eventually moved from the classroom to the political stage, where he continued to champion public education – including as a fierce, but always soft-spoken, opponent of school vouchers. He also tirelessly promoted reforms to improve ethics and accountability standards in public office, usually against a strong political head wind.
Burningham spent 15 years in the House, representing Bountiful, and another 16 years on the Utah Board of Education, seven years as chairman.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apq (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aps (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/apA (DCC)

http://gousoe.uen.org/apy (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/apz (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/apr (SLT obituary)

 

Our Schools Now to hold public meetings across Utah Tuesday on $700M tax hike initiative
Our Schools Now » Utahns are invited to ask about effort meant to boost education funding.

Utahns unsure whether to add their signature to – and potentially vote for – a $700 million tax hike to fund education will have a chance to ask questions and submit comments at a series of public meetings next week.
Our Schools Now, which is prepping a 2018 ballot initiative that would raise Utah’s sales and income taxes by one-half of 1 percent, announced Wednesday a list of regional meetings scheduled for July 11, ahead of a signature drive in August.
The Tuesday meetings will be held simultaneously at 6 p.m. at elementary schools in Salt Lake City, Orem, St. George, Logan, Ephraim, Price and Vernal.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aph (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/apL (SGS)

http://gousoe.uen.org/apw (SGN)

 

UEA President Heidi Mathews Working to Increase State Education Funding

The Utah Education Association President lives in Park City and after a year in the role, she’s still confident they’ll find ways to improve all of Utah’s school districts. Carolyn Murray has more:
http://gousoe.uen.org/apM (KCPW) audio

 

Public hearing to be held on juvenile detention admission guidelines

ST. GEORGE – A hearing seeking public comment on proposed changes to admission guidelines for who can be held in juvenile detention centers will be held in St. George Monday evening.
The Utah Division of Juvenile Justice Services will hold the meeting at St. George City Hall, 175 North 200 E., from 6-8 p.m.
The amendment proposes three key changes to the way children are admitted to detention centers:

* Youth can be admitted for any class A misdemeanor against a person.
* Youth under age 12 can no longer be admitted unless they are charged with a violent felony offense.
* Youth can no longer be admitted for failure to appear at court hearings within the past 12 months.

http://gousoe.uen.org/apv (SGN)

 

Former Park City High School principal settles lawsuit with district
Terms were not disclosed, but Hilary Hays sought $910,000 in damages after firing

The Park City School District reached a settlement with former high school principal Hilary Hays, who sued in the wake of her 2012 firing, concluding a lawsuit Thursday that stretched more than three years.
According to documents filed in U.S. District Court, the sides agreed on a settlement over the winter, but didn’t receive the required approval from Gov. Gary Herbert until recently. The payout will come from Utah’s Risk Management Fund, which insures all public school districts in the state, but terms of the settlement, reached in a sealed hearing, were not disclosed.
In a May status update letter to the court, Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes and Assistant Attorney General Daniel Widdison, who represented the district in court, indicated the magnitude of the settlement warranted close scrutiny from Herbert.
“Due to the size of the settlement and the impact it will have on the State Risk Fund, the governor is taking extra time to review this settlement before giving his final approval/disapproval,” they wrote in the letter.
U.S. District Court Judge Jill Parrish dismissed the lawsuit with prejudice Thursday, closing the case.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apO (PR)

Doug Wright named new Monticello City Manager

Doug Wright is the new Monticello City Manager. He takes the place of Ty Bailey, who recently resigned to accept a similar position in Morgan, UT.
A committee that included members of the city council and city staff, and Blanding City Manager Jeremy Redd, interviewed seven applicants for the position on June 30 before picking Dr. Wright.
Wright is expected to begin his new position on August 1.
Mayor Tim Young said the applicant pool was outstanding, with a mix of local and out-of-area applicants. Young also said the list of qualified applicants was impressive and was larger than for the last hiring.
Young said that Wright interviewed very well. “I was really impressed with his knowledge of how government works,” said Young.
Dr. Wright accepted his new position one year to the day after he retired as superintendent of the San Juan School District on June 30, 2016.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apP (San Juan Record)

 

 

People on the Move

Salt Lake City-The University of Utah announced that Elaine Clark, professor of educational psychology at the U, has accepted the appointment as the new dean of the College of Education. For a seamless transition, Clark will begin July 1 as the current dean, María Fránquiz, moves to her new position as deputy chief academic officer for Faculty Development and Innovation. Clark has been a member of the faculty in the Department of Educational Psychology since 1983. She served as the director of the school psychology program for 21 years and department chair for six. She has dedicated her career to the development of applied research and the preparation of school psychologists to provide effective services to individuals who have significant social, emotional and learning challenges, in particular, those with an autism spectrum disorder. Clark has served as the president of the Society for the Study of School Psychology and is a member of the American Psychological Association Board of Professional Affairs. She has also served in offices within the state, including the Utah Association of School Psychologists and Utah Psychological Association.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apN (Utah Business)

 

Champions Challenge Rodeo partners with Nebo student readers

One of the top rodeos in the nation, the Wrangler Champions Challenge Rodeo in Spanish Fork, recognized 18 students in Nebo School District for their success in the Champions Reading Challenge.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apt (Serve Daily)

 

Salvation Army opens annual Back to School drive

The Salvation Army of Mesquite is now accepting applications for its Back to School Buddies backpack drive, a program that supported 140 local children last year.
The annual drive serves to provide backpacks and school supplies for children in kindergarten through 12th grade in the Virgin Valley. The Salvation Army is asking for donations of pencils, pens, notebook paper, binders, glue, scissors and folders, as well as monetary donations.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apu (SGS)

This Abandoned Utah High School Was Once A Utah Icon – But It Will Soon Be Gone

Granite High school opened its doors to students in South Salt Lake in 1907, and was a vibrant part of the community for more than 100 years. Sadly, the school closed its doors forever in 2009, and has remained vacant ever since.
While developers and politicians fought over this piece of property on the corner of 500 E 3300 S., alumni and local residents have waged their own war to keep the school from being demolished. Despite their best efforts, Granite High School is in the process of demolition now.and will soon be gone forever.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apQ (Only In Your State)

 

 

Sports Field Holdings, Inc. Awarded New Crimson High School Athletic Field In St. George, Utah

WARRENVILLE, Ill. — Sports Field Holdings, Inc., through its wholly owned subsidiary FIRSTFORM®, Inc. (“FirstForm”), announced today it was awarded a contract to construct the first athletic field to be installed at the new Crimson High School in St. George, Utah.
The new Crimson High School is part of the Washington County School District, the largest school district in St George, Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apR (Globe Newswire)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Sutherland Comments on Utah’s ESSA Consolidated Plan
Sutherland Institute commentary by education policy analyst Christine Cooke

The following are public comments submitted on Utah’s draft of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Consolidated State Plan.
“Sutherland Institute champions the individual student. The aim and purpose of every K-12 education policy ought to be meeting the unique needs and potential of each child. We also champion federalism, a principle that requires policymaking authority to operate at the proper level of government.
Education is a state and local issue. Parents and leaders closest to the student are in the best position to make educational choices for a student. We urge state education leaders to make concerted efforts to reduce our dependence on federal programs and funds. Doing so will help restore state, local, and parental control and autonomy.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apx

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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DeVos’s Hard Line on New Education Law Surprises States
New York Times

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, who made a career of promoting local control of education, has signaled a surprisingly hard-line approach to carrying out an expansive new federal education law, issuing critical feedback that has rattled state school chiefs and conservative education experts alike.
President Barack Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act in 2015 as the less intrusive successor to the No Child Left Behind law, which was maligned by many in both political parties as punitive and prescriptive. But in the Education Department’s feedback to states about their plans to put the new law into effect, it applied strict interpretations of statutes, required extensive detail and even deemed some state education goals lackluster.
In one case, the acting assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education, Jason Botel, wrote to the State of Delaware that its long-term goals for student achievement were not “ambitious.”
“It is mind-boggling that the department could decide that it’s going to challenge them on what’s ambitious,” said Michael J. Petrilli, the president of the conservative-leaning Thomas B. Fordham Institute, who worked in the Education Department under President George W. Bush. He called the letter “directly in opposition to the rhetoric and the promises of DeVos.”
After more than a decade of strict federal education standards and standardized testing regimes, the Every Student Succeeds Act was to return latitude to the states to come up with plans to improve student achievement and hold schools accountable for student performance
http://gousoe.uen.org/apo

 

Why the Long Arc of School-Choice Research May Bend Toward Vouchers
A new study from Louisiana shows test-score improvement among voucher recipients.
Atlantic

Past research on Louisiana’s school-voucher program came to a bleak conclusion: Students who used the program to transfer to a private school saw their test scores plummet.
A new study complicates that narrative, finding some good-or at least, less bad-news about the closely watched program.
The research shows that, for students who received a voucher at the middle or end of elementary school, there were no statistically significant effects on their math or reading test scores by the third year in the program. That’s a boon for voucher advocates who have argued against judging a program by its initial impacts.
This “is an initial study of a very long-term question: Namely, can government create a level playing field for all types of schools so that the best of all types of schools are available to the most disadvantaged students?” John White, the schools superintendent of Louisiana, told Chalkbeat, which produced this piece in partnership with The Atlantic. “I think this study shows that we are on our way to making that happen.”
Still, other aspects of the study suggest that the program continues to have negative effects, often large ones, on some students, specifically those in early grades.
The findings come as U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has promised a major federal push to expand private-school choice. The Louisiana Scholarship Program, a statewide initiative that uses public funds to pay private-school tuition for certain low-income students, is the seventh-largest voucher program in the country, serving over 7,000 students.
The research is a follow-up to an earlier study conducted by Jonathan Mills and Patrick Wolf of the University of Arkansas and has not been formally peer-reviewed. The study was funded by the Smith Richardson Foundation.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apI

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/apJ (Education Research Alliance for New Orleans)

 

Schuette: Schools can’t lose state of Michigan funding for American Indian mascots
Detroit Free Press

The state education superintendent doesn’t have the authority to withhold state school aid from school districts that use American-Indian mascots, logos or other imagery, according to state Attorney General Bill Schuette in an opinion released this week.
Superintendent Brian Whiston asked Schuette to issue an opinion on the case after the State Board of Education threatened to withhold some state funding from the Paw Paw School District. That came after the district’s board of education voted to keep the high school’s Redskins mascot.
The state board for years has been encouraging school districts to rid their schools of American-Indian mascots and imagery, saying use of such materials is offensive. And in the months prior to the Paw Paw board voting, members of the American-Indian community had come to state board meetings imploring its members to intervene.
http://gousoe.uen.org/api

 

How Accessible Is Gifted Education in Your State?
Education Week

Nationwide, less than 7 percent of U.S. students participate in gifted education programs, according to an analysis of the most recent 2014 federal civil rights data.
In part, that’s because states and districts use different tests and criteria to identify students as gifted or talented. But it’s also because some states have a far greater percentage of schools that even offer gifted education programs than do others, as the chart below shows.
That’s based on an Education Week Research Center analysis of the 2014 federal Civil Rights Data Collection. The data are state-reported to the U.S. Department of Education for K-12 public school grades, though gifted programs tend to focus on grades 3-8, and the office for civil rights asks separate questions about high school Advanced Placement and International Bacchalaureate programs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apl

 

Expert: NM teacher evals are toughest in the nation
Albuquerque (NM) Journal

New Mexico rated more than twice as many teachers below effective than any other state in a 24-state study conducted by a Brown University economist who studies teacher evaluation systems across the country.
New Mexico placed 28.7 percent of its teachers in that category in 2015-2016, while the majority of states rated fewer than 4 percent of teachers below effective, according to Matthew Kraft, Brown University assistant professor of education and economics.
“The New Mexico system is very different than others,” Kraft said. ” ‘Tough’ would be one way to describe it.”
Although Kraft questioned whether New Mexico’s system is alienating too many teachers, the bulk of his paper criticized those states with the highest teacher proficiency rates – often nearing 100 percent.
Kraft attributed New Mexico’s dramatic results to its evaluation system, particularly its heavy weight on student test scores.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apj

 

Want Principals to Rate Teachers Honestly? Take Away the Stakes.
Education Week

Principals are more likely to rate teachers as ineffective in a confidential setting than on a formal evaluation with stakes attached, a new study finds.
That’s in part because principals want to maintain good relationships with their teachers, which can be tough to do when they have to confront them with bad scores, the researchers say.
Researchers have long flagged the lack of variation in teachers’ evaluation ratings. In 2009, TNTP published its eye-opening report The Widget Effect, which found that less than 1 percent of teachers were being rated as unsatisfactory. Many states began taking steps to implement more rigorous evaluation systems. The federal Race to the Top program, starting at the end of that year, offered states incentives to incorporate student test scores into those evaluations.
But teachers have continued to get high-and potentially inflated-ratings, the research shows.
“We’ve invested a lot in making these systems rigorous and yet they still seem to identify the vast majority of teachers as effective, especially when you look at the observation ratings from principals,” said Jason Grissom, an associate professor of public policy and education at Vanderbilt University, who co-authored the study.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apF

 

Just 20 Percent of K-12 Students Are Learning a Foreign Language
Education Week

Arguing that the inability to communicate in any language but English constitutes a threat to the nation’s economic and military security, two recent studies have painted a grim picture of foreign-language education in the nation’s K-12 schools.
The reports from the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and American Councils for International Education found that public schools and state departments of education are struggling to find qualified world language instructors and unequipped to track local and national trends on language learning.
The American Councils for International Education survey-which sought state-by-state data on enrollment in foreign language courses-estimates that 10.6 million K-12 students in the United States are studying a world language or American Sign Language.
That’s only one out of every five students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apC

Copies of the reports
http://gousoe.uen.org/apD (American Academy of Arts & Sciences)

http://gousoe.uen.org/apE (American Councils for International Education)

 

Catholic church eyes ‘game-changing’ school choice plan
Politico

Catholic leaders are meeting with GOP lawmakers and members of the Trump administration, hoping to shape a federal plan they believe could spur a rebirth of parochial education. The Trump administration’s consideration of a federal tax credit scholarship program could be a boon for Catholic schools, many of which have seen devastating enrollment drops and rising costs that have put them out of reach for many poor and working class families. Catholic leaders are seizing the moment, pushing for a federal program that comes with few constraints. “We see this as game-changing,” said Greg Dolan, associate director for public policy for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Secretariat of Catholic Education. Caitlin Emma has the story.
– Push for religious freedom, flexibility: While the Trump administration has yet to back a plan and any proposal would have to pass the House and Senate, Catholic leaders have already come out against provisions of bills reintroduced by Rep. Todd Rokita (R-Ind.) and Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) that would prevent state-based scholarship organizations from awarding funds to schools of a particular faith. In a letter to the lawmakers last month, Youngstown Bishop George Murry, chairman of the bishops’ Committee on Catholic Education, also stressed that Catholic schools “must retain their autonomy, both in regards to religious identity and educational character. This independence includes, but is not necessarily limited to, control over mission-driven hiring, academically-stringent admissions, and curriculum.”
– Prioritizing family “satisfaction,” not test scores: Murry suggested that such schools be held accountable based “upon the satisfaction of participating families,” rather than on the student test scores required of their public school counterparts. “Parental surveys, the number of families renewing scholarships, student graduation and matriculation, and basic accounting requirements, for example, are sufficient to assess and maintain the integrity of the program,” he wrote. He also pushed back on the notion espoused by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos that states might “opt out” of participating in a federal program. “Qualifying families in all fifty states must be able to access a scholarship,” Murry wrote.
– The potential benefits for Catholic schools are evident in states with their own tax credit scholarship programs. Philadelphia’s West Catholic Preparatory High School nearly shut its doors five years ago before state lawmakers expanded tax credits for businesses that donate to state-sanctioned scholarship organizations. That move, coupled with other reforms, saved West Catholic. The school now collects $800,000 in tuition from annual tax credits – 13 times what it did when the school was struggling to survive. Enrollment has doubled and the school offers more academic enrichment courses. Students are now “graduating and going onto college and they have bright futures,” said Pennsylvania Catholic Conference Education Director Sean McAleer. “And also they’ve been given what’s most important, God’s word.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/apk

What Makes a Teacher of the Year Run for Political Office?
Education Week

Teachers across the state of Arizona have confided in Christine Porter Marsh, the state’s 2016 teacher of the year, about how frustrated they are-how they have to work a second or third job to survive on their teacher salary; how they have unmanageably large class sizes; how they often have to make the “gut-wrenching decision” to leave teaching because of the state’s education policies.
So, Marsh, a high school teacher with 25 years of experience, decided to run for political office.
“I figured I was going to lose sleep if I ran or didn’t run, and I figured I’d rather lose sleep running and trying to make a few positive changes, than not run and be in a position of powerlessness,” Marsh said in an interview with Education Week Teacher.
She announced in late May that she will run as a Democrat for a state Senate seat, challenging the Republican incumbent during the 2018 elections.
“Being teacher of the year gave me an even broader perspective of what’s going on in Arizona,” she said. “I knew it was bad … but I didn’t know that it was as bad as it actually is until I was teacher of the year.”
Marsh joins a small club of state teachers of the year who have had political ambitions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apG

 

Barred from the boys’ bathroom, a transgender teen sues a Florida school board
Washington Post

When Drew Adams began at Allen D. Nease High School in Ponte Vedra, Fla., he was excited for a fresh start with new classmates. The transgender teen, who was born female, transitioned the summer before his freshman year. He was going to school as a boy for the first time.
It also meant that he was using the boys’ bathroom.
But school officials barred him from the boys’ bathroom a month after school began in 2015, Drew said, after someone anonymously complained about his presence there. When his mother, Erica Kasper, failed to reach a resolution with school officials, she filed a complaint with the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights, which had successfully pressed other school districts into allowing transgender students to use bathrooms that matched the gender they identify with. The office began investigating but stopped after a federal judge in August 2016 issued an injunction in response to a lawsuit challenging the department’s protections for transgender students.
After hearing nothing from federal officials for nearly a year, and after the Trump administration rescinded protections for transgender schoolchildren seeking to use bathrooms that align with their gender identity, Drew and his mother gave up hope. Last week they sued school officials and the St. Johns County School Board, alleging that the school system is violating Drew’s rights by refusing him access to the boys’ bathroom and directing him to use out-of-the-way unisex bathrooms.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apm

 

Should Students Be Taught How to Deal With Police?
Education Week

New Jersey students in kindergarten through 12th grade may soon get lessons in how to interact with cops “in a manner marked by mutual cooperation and respect.”
Bill A1114, passed unanimously by the General Assembly, would require each school district to instruct students on their rights, as well as the ins and outs of dealing with law enforcement. The lessons would begin in the 2018-2019 school year as part of the social studies curriculum if the bill becomes law.
According to a press release from Assembly Democrats, lessons must relate information on the police officer’s role and responsibilities in keeping the public safe. But lessons will also address students’ responsibility to comply with an officer’s commands as well as their constitutional rights during police interactions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apH

 

Malala Yousafzai, Girls’ Education Advocate, Finishes High School
New York Times

It’s not unusual for teenagers to take a summer trip after graduating high school, but Malala Yousafzai is a bit different.
The 19-year-old Pakistani woman attended her last day of secondary school in Birmingham, England, on Friday, a milestone for the activist who has fought for girls’ education. She said on her new Twitter account that she would begin traveling next week to the Middle East, Africa and Latin America to meet with girls.
“I enjoyed my school years, and I am excited for my future,” she wrote in her blog. “But I can’t help thinking of millions of girls around the world who won’t complete their education.”
Ms. Yousafzai became the youngest winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014, having risen to international prominence as a voice against Islamist violence. She escaped to Britain in 2012 after being shot in the head by the Taliban when she was 15.
She founded the Malala Fund in 2013, an advocacy organization to ensure girls’ education worldwide.
http://gousoe.uen.org/apB

http://gousoe.uen.org/apK (Parade Magazine)

 

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CALENDAR
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UEN News
http://www.uen.org

July 13:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

Native American Legislative Liaison Committee meeting
10 a.m., 707 N Main Street, Brigham City
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=SPENAL

July 14:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

July 19:

Utah State Charter School Board hearing and meeting
9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://utahpubliceducation.org/2017/07/10/state-charter-school-board-hearing-meeting/#.WWPF3YgrLcs

July 25:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

July 26:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

August 23:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

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