Education News Roundup: July 31, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Our Schools Now says support is growing for its ballot initiative to raise taxes for school funding.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayI (SLT)

AFT holds a rally for public schools in Salt Lake.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayH (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/az8 (KTVX)

KUER looks at the ARL licensing process.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayV (KUER)

Seventeen magazine has palpitations over flooding at East High. It was where “High School Musical” was filmed, you know.
http://gousoe.uen.org/az2 (Seventeen)

ED clarifies school improvement evidence rule in ESSA. (Trust ENR. If you’re really into federal ed policy, that was a meaningful sentence.)
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayK (Ed Week)
or a copy of the regulation
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayL (Federal Register)

Ed Week takes a deep look into the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, aka COPPA.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayX (Ed Week)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Support grows for ballot item angling for more school money
Our Schools Now > Initiative to raise $700M yearly has backing across political parties, poll indicates.

Utah labor unions, teachers rally for public schools
Education > March meant to oppose school policies and budget cuts sought by Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

Hopeful Teacher Applicants Are Dealing With Snags In Licensing Process

No plans for $1.1 M Cache County School District art collection

Teaching teachers – Instructors head back to school for STEM education

School districts to hold Truth in Taxation hearings

More States Take On Media Literacy in Schools

Logan teen jailed in sexting case involving minor

No kidding, Salt Lake school ‘gardeners’ are of the four-legged variety

How this Bronx teacher got Twitter’s Biz Stone to assist kids in America’s classrooms

Studies show benefits to academic acceleration

The Actual East High School From “High School Musical” Was Destroyed in a Flash Flood!
Noooooooooo!

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Private vs. Public

Blocked out from the blackout

‘They’ve been able to see something they haven’t seen before’

When is enough taxes too much?

A kid’s thoughts on local schools

What the ‘Government Schools’ Critics Really Mean

How a Colorado school board race has national implications for education and religious liberty

NATION

Education Department Clarifies ESSA Rules on School Improvement Evidence

Top Democrats to Betsy DeVos: Your New Plan for ESSA Review Violates the Law

COPPA and Schools: The (Other) Federal Student Privacy Law, Explained

College Board, Khan Academy to Offer Free AP Test Prep

Free Lunch at the Library

Idaho schools preparing for the August solar eclipse

Schools host prayer service for the start of school year

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Support grows for ballot item angling for more school money
Our Schools Now > Initiative to raise $700M yearly has backing across political parties, poll indicates.

A new poll shows the Our Schools Now ballot initiative is maintaining – and possibly expanding – its base of support as organizers prepare to gather signatures to qualify for the November 2018 ballot.
A majority of registered Utah voters – 57 percent – said they either “somewhat” or “strongly” support a proposal to raise roughly $700 million for public education through a combination of income and sales tax hikes. Forty percent opposed the initiative to some degree, with 3 percent undecided.
That’s a gain of 2 percentage points compared to a January poll that similarly found majority support for a tax increase to bolster schools.
“It shows that the narrative about needing to increase funding for public education is one that is resonating well,” said Jason Perry, director of the Hinckley Institute of Politics, which co-commissioned both polls with The Salt Lake Tribune.
Bob Marquardt, Our Schools Now committee member and chairman of Education First, said the results were encouraging with more than a year to go before voters cast their ballots.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayI (SLT)

 

Utah labor unions, teachers rally for public schools
Education > March meant to oppose school policies and budget cuts sought by Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

Utah’s largest unions joined Saturday with political advocates in a march in downtown Salt Lake City in support of public education.
The demonstration began at the downtown City Library before moving across the street to the City and County Building.
The march was in response to the school-related policies and budget proposals of President Donald Trump and his Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, according to Brad Asay, president of the Utah chapter of the American Federation of Teachers.
“Budget cuts from the current administration will drastically impact our kids,” Asay said in a statement.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayH (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/az8 (KTVX)

 

Hopeful Teacher Applicants Are Dealing With Snags In Licensing Process

There’s an effort in Utah among lawmakers and the state education board to make the process of getting licensed as a teacher as seamless as possible. But problems in the current system are holding up that process.
Avary Lebaron is a 25 year old legal assistant interested in a career change. He’d like to teach at an elementary school. Because he doesn’t have a teaching license he’s applying for what’s called an Alternate Route to Licensure (ARL) through the state.
Or rather, he’s been trying to apply.
“I had trouble finding anything on the state website,” says Lebaron. “I think I was eventually able to find some directions but I never found any forms on the state website.”
Lebaron didn’t find any forms because the state’s licensing portal is currently unavailable. A banner on the site says it will be back up on August 1st, but the deadline for ARL open application is July 31st. Exceptions are made for applicants who have been offered teaching positions but Lebaron wasn’t aware he should be applying for jobs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayV (KUER)

 

No plans for $1.1 M Cache County School District art collection

Art appraiser Allen Dodworth included some candid words in a 2014 memo to the Cache County School District superintendent regarding a 2-inch tear in a Minerva Teichert painting he valued at $300,000.
“To allow it to remain suggests indifference to the painting, much the same as allowing graffiti to remain on a public wall invites more disrespect,” Dodworth wrote of the painting that currently hangs in the Logan Historic Courthouse.
Superintendent Steve Norton is aware of both the tear and the admonishment.
“Yeah, yeah, yeah, we’ll get it fixed,” he said. “Our plans are to get it fixed.”
The school district owns a collection of 73 paintings with an appraised value of $1.1 million. They range from a $25 watercolor of a snow-covered shed to a $3,600 Florence Ellen Ware painting of Navajo women working a loom to the epic Teichert paintings that chronicle early Utah history. All but one of the artists in the collection are from Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayT (LHJ)

 

Teaching teachers – Instructors head back to school for STEM education

A handful of educators became students again as the Don A. Christiansen Regional Water Treatment Plant in Orem opened its doors to teach teachers about the science of water and integrating STEM techniques into their classrooms.
“For us, teaching the teacher makes the most sense,” said Monica Hoyt, education and public outreach director for the Central Utah Water Conservancy District. “They’re going to affect more children and more students than we can going out into to the classroom one at a time.”
Hoyt estimated that though there were less than ten educators at the session, that those teachers would affect roughly 1,800 students.
“We looked at what water touches, which is a lot of different areas of science, and so we’ve developed a curriculum for the teachers,” Hoyt said. The curriculum created generally covers grades 9-12, but focuses on the middle school level.
Hoyt explained that there are lots of great educational information on the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and math available to teachers, but not all of it meets Common Core requirements.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayJ (PDH)

 

School districts to hold Truth in Taxation hearings

Local school districts will hold Truth in Taxation hearings over the next two weeks to hear public input on proposed property tax increases, but most residents may end up paying less than last year.
In Logan City School District, Business Administrator Jeff Barben said they are holding a Truth In Taxation hearing to essentially keep the rates the same as they were last year.

In Cache County School District, Business Administrator Dale Hansen said they are proposing to raise their annual property tax revenue by $1.4 million to cover the operating cost of the brand new Green Canyon High School. The money will pay for secretaries, custodians, coaches and the utility bill. They did the same thing last year to pay for Ridgeline High.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayS (LHJ)

 

More States Take On Media Literacy in Schools

In the wake of the 2016 presidential election and growth in the amount and influence of “fake news” on the internet, more states are considering or implementing measures to encourage or require schools to teach about media literacy.
Four states passed media literacy-related bills or laws in 2017, and a dozen others are home to coalitions of advocates pushing for such bills, according to Media Literacy Now, an advocacy group.
Last fall, a study from Stanford University found that many teenagers had trouble understanding what was and was not accurate or reliable online.
Since then, nonprofits, companies, and educators have been developing resources and bringing more attention to ongoing efforts to teach students how to understand online information and think critically about what they encounter. Earlier this month, Media Literacy Now checked in on states’ legislative efforts to address this issue.

Six states considered bills based on Washington’s law, which Media Literacy Now says it is using as model legislation. According to Media Literacy Now, New Jersey, Utah, Florida, Ohio, Illiniois, Minnesota, and California also address address media literacy in a variety of statutes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/az7 (Ed Week)

 

Logan teen jailed in sexting case involving minor

An 18-year-old Logan man has spent the summer in the Cache County Jail and has a six-month prison stay hanging over his head after sexting with his 16-year-old girlfriend.
“There is no honor in what you did and there is no honor in spending time in jail,” Judge Kevin Allen said Monday when the youth was sentenced.
According to Cache County prosecutor Spencer Walsh, the young man and the girl in the case exchanged more than 30 photos and several videos that amounted to child porn and they including footage of sexual activity involving the girl. It does not appear that the photos or videos were distributed outside of that relationship, according to Walsh, which could warrant more serious charges.
“Youth need to understand that this is a felony,” Allen said. “This is a serious crime.”
This young man was charged and convicted of dealing in materials harmful to a minor, a third-degree felony offense for persons over the age of 18.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayU (LHJ)

 

No kidding, Salt Lake school ‘gardeners’ are of the four-legged variety

SALT LAKE CITY – One lazy summer afternoon on Marmalade Hill, a herd of 50 goats was hard at work devouring overgrown vegetation from the hillside behind Washington Elementary School.
The small herd from 4 Leaf Ranch in Kamas is a green alternative for eliminating cheat grass and other plants that have overtaken the hillside.
“They’re very good employees. They’re very good at what they do. It’s a natural approach to dealing with this without using any kind of harsh chemicals of any kind. This is the more natural approach to taking care of this overgrown vegetation. I think it’s in their DNA. They know how to do this better than all of us,” said Ricardo Zubiate, assistant director of facility services for the Salt Lake City School District.
This is the third year that the school district has contracted with 4 Leaf Ranch to perform the service. Ordinarily, the ranch brings 100 to 200 goats to handle the job but due to other commitments, only 50 goats were available, said 4 Leaf Ranch owner Greg Cover.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayN (DN)

 

How this Bronx teacher got Twitter’s Biz Stone to assist kids in America’s classrooms

Like all teachers, Charles Best wants to see his students succeed. Yet as a high school history teacher at Wings Academy in the Bronx, he saw firsthand the struggles his students faced: No dental care, no winter jackets, no lunch or school supplies.
As a result, Best was spending upward of $500 a year to give students the tools they needed to stay motivated to learn.
After five years of digging into his own pocket, Best came up with a solution: DonorsChoose.org, an online platform that empowers public school teachers across the United States to request funding for the materials and enrichment experiences their students need in order to progress – things like reading materials, whiteboards, audiobooks, math games and lap desks.

In February, DonorsChoose.org expanded their original project model to include Student Life Essentials, a platform that goes beyond school supplies to provide students with critical life needs, like warm coats, clean clothes, personal hygiene items and food for outside of school. The concept, says DonorsChoose.org, is that having these materials means students can come to school with confidence, ready to learn, which will in turn set them up for better success.
SLE has caught the attention of notable philanthropists, including Twitter co-founder Biz Stone; co-owners of Townsend Press, Judy Nadell and John Langan; and Goldman Sachs executive Scott Rofey, among others. Together they have agreed to provide a $1 million fund that will be sourced to match any donation the projects in the SLE program receive.
Since its launch on February 9, SLE has raised more than $1,002,780 fully funding 2,025 projects to aid 241,226 students. These projects served 1,017 schools across America. Among the successful campaigns: footwear at Lincoln Elementary School in Utah, umbrellas at Frank Elementary School in Wisconsin and personal hygiene products for Muskegon Middle School in Michigan.
http://gousoe.uen.org/az3 (CNBC)

 

Studies show benefits to academic acceleration

Studies written by Russell Warne, an associate professor of psychology at UVU, indicate that children who skip a grade earn more than their peers. Children who finish their K-12 education early made about 5 percent more than those who finished precollegiate education on time, according to the research. The two studies were published in Learning and Instruction and in the Journal of School Psychology.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayP (PDH)

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayQ (Journal of School Psychology)

The Actual East High School From “High School Musical” Was Destroyed in a Flash Flood!
Noooooooooo!

Devastating news Wildcats: The real East High from High School Musical has been damaged in a flash flood!
On Wednesday, heavy rain overwhelmed Salt Lake City, Utah’s storm drains, triggering a flash flood that damaged homes and schools – including the iconic East High School where High School Musical was filmed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/az2 (Seventeen)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Private vs. Public
Salt Lake City Weekly commentary by columnist Katharine Biele

Why all the secrecy? Of course, officials would prefer that the public they represent not hear contentious discourse. That’s why the Kobach Commission has been playing fast and loose with the idea of open meetings. While the commission delves into your private voting history, it doesn’t want you to know too much. An NPR report made it clear, though, that among other problems, live-streaming a meeting doesn’t make it public. In a separate issue, the Utah Education Association is suing the state Board of Education to keep teacher disciplinary records private. But BYU journalism professor Joel Campbell reminded them, in a letter to The Salt Lake Tribune, that the law says past and present disciplinary actions of government employees are public. Hiding your dirty laundry will not win trust.
http://gousoe.uen.org/az4

 

Blocked out from the blackout
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Paul Rolly

The much-hyped total eclipse of the sun – a once-in-a-lifetime event for many – will be visible in much of North America on the morning of Aug. 21.
It will provide a great educational experience for students and an opportunity for discussions in their classrooms. But students in three school districts along the Wasatch Front will have to miss it – unless they decide to skip school.
Salt Lake, Granite and Murray districts will open their school year on that day – despite protests from some parents who want to turn viewing of the rare event into a family field trip.
http://gousoe.uen.org/az9

‘They’ve been able to see something they haven’t seen before’
Deseret News commentary by columnist Lee Benson

OREM – Three years ago, when they were 12 years old and just out of elementary school, three Navajo kids, Jadan Lacy, Shakira Cervantes and Quiana Dishface, had a decision to make:
Should they stay home on the reservation for the summer or should they spend it in town in Blanding taking math classes?
They chose summer school, believe it or not.
Smart kids.
This Friday, in ceremonies at the Utah State University campus in Blanding, Jadan, Shakira and Quiana will be part of a group of 23 Native American teenagers who represent the first graduating class of PREP, a national summer school program that prepares kids to be scientists, engineers, doctors, tech wizards, astronauts and the like. (PREP stands for Prefreshman Engineering Program).
For three straight years, the American Indian kids have given up six weeks of their summer vacation to live on campus at the USU-Blanding dorms and immerse themselves in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayO

 

When is enough taxes too much?
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from LeRoy Parkinson

The issue of more taxes for education is going to be on your voting ballot this fall. The state has already given six thousand dollars raise to the teachers. Now they want you, the good old taxpayer, to pick up the bill. When is enough too much? We have come to fear the state legislation going into session because here comes more taxes! They do not vote for the people they represent! Last year the five-cent increase on every gallon of gas has made hundreds of millions for the state. The state tax from Amazon for three months was $193 million. Amazon is big business. At that rate the state picks $772 million in one year. Where does all the money go? That is just one of the online sales taxes. There are many others.
As for the old taxpayer-when is enough enough? Now they want one half of one percent on your property tax and 34 of one percent on sales tax. That will cost the average tax payer over $200 per year. Sales tax is regressive and depressive and a killer for growth and the development of our economy.
Utah is a Republican State. The party platform is said to be conservative. Our legislators don’t seem to know that.
http://gousoe.uen.org/az5

 

A kid’s thoughts on local schools
(Provo) Daily Herald letter from Hayden Milne

I am a scout in Saratoga Springs, I’m working on my communications merit badge and one of the requirements is that I write a letter telling you about a city issue I am interested in. One things that I am interested in is education. My education will affect my future education in college, getting a good job, and taking care of my future family.
I recently moved to Utah from Arkansas. Some of the things that I like here in Utah are that I can retake my math tests if I don’t do well on them. Being able to fix my mistakes helps me to learn better. I like that there are several extracurricular classes for me to choose from like technology and band. At my school they have a program called TEAL time that gives me extra time in the classes that I need help in.
Some things that I don’t like are that we only get to do one semester of P.E. Another thing is that the classes are overcrowded.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayR

 

What the ‘Government Schools’ Critics Really Mean
New York Times op-ed by KATHERINE STEWART, author of “The Good News Club: The Christian Right’s Stealth Assault on America’s Children.”

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. – When President Trump recently proposed his budget for “school choice,” which would cut more than $9 billion in overall education spending but put more resources into charter schools and voucher programs, he promised to take a sledgehammer to what he has called “failing government schools.” That is harsh language for the places most of us call public schools, and where nearly 90 percent of American children get their education. But in certain conservative circles, the phrase “government schools” has become as ubiquitous as it is contemptuous.
What most people probably hear in this is the unmistakable refrain of American libertarianism, for which all government is big and bad. The point of calling public schools “government schools” is to conjure the specter of pathologically inefficient, power-mad bureaucrats. Accordingly, right-wing think tanks like the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, the Heartland Institute and the Acton Institute have in recent years published screeds denouncing “the command and control mentality” of “government schools” that are “prisons for poor children.” All of these have received major funding from the family of the education secretary, Betsy DeVos, either directly or via a donor group.
The libertarian tradition is indebted, above all, to the Chicago economist Milton Friedman, who published a hugely influential 1955 paper, “The Role of Government in Education.” A true believer in the power of free markets to solve all of humanity’s problems, Friedman argued that “government schools” are intrinsically inefficient and unjustified. He proposed that taxpayers should give money to parents and allow them to choose where to spend education dollars in a marketplace of freely competing private providers. This is the intellectual foundation of Ms. DeVos’s voucher proposals.
But the attacks on “government schools” have a much older, darker heritage. They have their roots in American slavery, Jim Crow-era segregation, anti-Catholic sentiment and a particular form of Christian fundamentalism – and those roots are still visible today.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayG

 

How a Colorado school board race has national implications for education and religious liberty
(Washington, DC) The Hill op-ed by ROSS IZARD, senior education policy analyst at the Independence Institute, a free-market think tank headquartered in Denver, Colorado

A wise man once said that all politics is local. Nowhere is that aphorism better illustrated than Douglas County, Colorado, where education politics and an ongoing constitutional fight over educational choice have converged to create perhaps the most consequential school board election in modern American history. Here, in a largely suburban county thousands of miles removed from the national stage of Washington, D.C., the futures of tens of thousands of students across America may well be decided.
Colorado is no stranger to titanic school board fights. In 2015, a massive recall election marked by massive spending and deliberate deception by the teachers union and its allies in Jefferson County generated national headlines. Other districts saw unprecedented flows of cash from outside groups hoping to overturn choice-minded majorities, often through dark money channels that obscured their true origins.
Douglas County, Colorado’s third-largest school district, faced its own battle in 2015-a battle that resulted in three of seven school board seats being lost to opponents of broad parental choice. Since then, the district has been “in a constant state of conflict.” The remaining four seats are up for grabs this November, and the loss of even one of these seats to opponents of educational freedom would result in a majority opposed to full-spectrum parental choice.
Meanwhile, an enormously important constitutional fight over parental choice has intersected with the school board race. In 2011, Douglas County enacted the Choice Scholarship Program, a unique pilot program that would have allowed up to 500 students to attend participating private schools, including faith-based private schools, using publicly funded scholarships. The program was immediately challenged under Colorado’s state constitutional Blaine clause, which prohibits aid to “sectarian” institutions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/az0

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Education Department Clarifies ESSA Rules on School Improvement Evidence
Education Week

Using research to improve schools means more than just finding a successful evaluation of a program. Tailoring interventions to students, implementing them well, and evaluating them carefully all make the difference between a program that has worked somewhere and a program that works in your school.
The U.S. Education Department hopes to get more states, districts, and researchers thinking about evidence use more deeply with new rules to apply standards of research evidence for school improvement and other projects under the Every Student Succeeds Act. In a Federal Register notice published Monday morning, the department lays out the new requirements for direct grants under the Education Department General Administrative Regulations, or EDGAR, to bring them in line with the tiered standards for evidence that are outlined in ESSA.
For the most part, the rules tweak or clarify existing rules to incorporate ESSA’s four increasingly rigorous levels of evidence.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayK

A copy of the regulation
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayL (Federal Register)

 

Top Democrats to Betsy DeVos: Your New Plan for ESSA Review Violates the Law
Education Week

The top two Democrats for education in Congress have warned U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos that her department’s new approach to reviewing states’ Every Student Succeeds Act plans is riddled with problems.
Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., and Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., the ranking Democrats on the respective Senate and House education committees, wrote in a Friday letter to DeVos that the U.S. Department of Education’s plans to begin conducting two-hour phone calls with states about their ESSA plans before providing states with formal comments will “limit the public’s knowledge” about ESSA-related agreements between states and the department.
“We are deeply concerned that this decision will result in inconsistent treatment of state agencies, leading to flawed implementation of our nation’s education law and harm to our nation’s most vulnerable students,” Murray and Scott wrote.
The two lawmakers also say that the revised approach to ESSA violates the section of the law that deals with state plans.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayY

 

COPPA and Schools: The (Other) Federal Student Privacy Law, Explained
Education Week

When it comes to federal protections for students’ sensitive personal information, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, or FERPA, tends to get most of the attention.
But schools also need to be familiar with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, commonly known as COPPA.
In a nutshell, COPPA requires operators of commercial websites, online services, and mobile apps to notify parents and obtain their consent before collecting any personal information on children under the age of 13. The aim is to give parents more control over what information is collected from their children online.
This law directly regulates companies, not schools. But as the digital revolution has moved into the classroom, schools have increasingly been put in the middle of the relationship between vendors and parents.
The Federal Trade Commission, which enforces COPPA, has said that schools can, in many situations, stand in for parents and let companies collect information from young children. In some cases, companies may try to shift some of the burden of COPPA compliance away from themselves and onto schools. And it’s clear that the law places significant indirect burdens on schools and educators.
Those dynamics have opened up multiple cans of worms, said Sonja H. Trainor, the director of the Council of School Attorneys for the National School Boards Association.
“The FTC has decided, not based on law or regulation, but as a practical reality, that schools can give consent on behalf of parents,” Trainor said. “That is not without risk, and COPPA has a whole lot of gray area that gives school attorneys pause.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayX

 

College Board, Khan Academy to Offer Free AP Test Prep
Education Week

Washington — The College Board, which adminsters the Advanced Placement program, and Khan Academy, an online nonprofit offering resources and videos, are teaming up to create a supply of free test-preparation and course materials for teachers and students in every AP subject, the groups announced today.
It’s essentially the deepening of what the organizations say has been a successful partnership, begun in 2014, to offer free online resources and tutoring for the SAT college-entrance examination.
The new teacher supports will roll out in the 2019-20 school year, the groups announced at the annual AP conference here. Using an online dashboard, teachers will be able to create customized quizzes, homework, classroom activities, and AP practice using the new materials, as well as access unit guides for the major topics in AP subjects and related unit tests. They can assign instructional videos and practice questions from the Khan Academy to their students, and they’ll also have access to previously administered AP exam questions and prompts.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayZ

 

Free Lunch at the Library
New York Times


Librarians used to forbid any food or drink to avoid staining books and attracting pests. People who tried to sneak snacks in the stacks would be reprimanded. But in recent years, a growing number of libraries have had a major shift in policy: They are the ones putting food on the table.
Hundreds of libraries are now serving federally funded summer meals to children to ensure that they don’t go hungry. The change is part of an effort to stay relevant to patrons, and to pair nutrition and educational activities so low-income children get summertime learning, too.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayF

 

Idaho schools preparing for the August solar eclipse
Associated Press

TWIN FALLS, Idaho – A total solar eclipse coming up in August is creating a scheduling headache for schools.
Is it worth canceling classes? Or should students stay in school and use the eclipse as a learning experience?
And for some, eclipse day Aug. 21 marks the first day of school.
Some schools are holding classes as usual and buying solar glasses for students. Others are canceling school and teacher work days altogether.
http://gousoe.uen.org/ayM

 

Schools host prayer service for the start of school year
(Columbus, MS) WCBI

CALHOUN COUNTY, Miss. – For the last few weeks, we have been talking about the different aspects of preparation that schools across our area are taking for the start of another school year.
While these stories all talk about the physical preparation, with supplies, decorating, and training, they never mention a spiritual preparation.
In Calhoun County, all high schools held a prayer service to pray for students, faculty, and administration.
It’s another way to prepare schools for another year of classes.
“To lift up the students, the support staff, the administration… That they would just follow God’s leadership,” says Bruce High Principal, Dallas Gore.
The high schools in Calhoun County each held their own prayer service to spiritually prepare school and community members for the upcoming school year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/az1

 

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CALENDAR
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UEN News
http://www.uen.org

August 3:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

August 4:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

August 22:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

August 23:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

September 19:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

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