Education News Roundup: Aug. 3, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Weber School District heads to the ballot with a $97 million bond proposal.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBc (OSE)

A military wife with 20 years of teaching experience discusses the difficulties of finding a job matching her experience. Her current station: Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBx (CNN)

Late Weber School Board President Brent Richardson leaves the district foundation $100,000.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBd (OSE)

Kaysville’s Career Path High School gets some national kudos for its use of open educational resources.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBt (The 74)

How much are tax breaks for big box stores affecting education funding nationally?
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBl (Ed Week)

Two new national efforts are underway to help teachers use technology in the classroom.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aB7 (Ed Week)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Weber School District sends $97 million bond question to ballot

Board proposes boundaries for new Farmington High School
Boundaries adjusted for Bountiful, Viewmont, Woods Cross, Davis, Layton high schools

Ogden School District hosting public bond initiative information session

Granite District Raises Property Tax For Teacher Pay

Law camp at BYU puts teens on trial and in the jury
Law camp aims to prepare teens for leadership and service.

Ivanka Trump spotlights military spouses’ employment challenges

ALA Plans Ribbon Cutting For New Addition

Late Weber School Board president Brent Richardson leaves foundation with $100K

Provo community mourns teacher’s sudden death

Internet crimes specialist says thousands of Utah kids on adult ‘hook-up’ sites

Give school supplies to kids in need at Pack the Bus, Backpack Bonanza events

OPINION & COMMENTARY

What should preschoolers learn before going to kindergarten

Educating teens regarding the harms of pornography

How OER Is Boosting School Performance and Equity From the Suburbs to the Arctic
Open Educational Resources – free, high-quality materials – are a windfall to remote and poor schools

I Failed the System: Representation, Meritocracy and Changing Education from the Top Down

Cybersecurity badge: One big step for Girl Scouts, potentially giant leap for women
Girls need to see themselves in the role of white-hat hackers to even the virtual playing field. This badge could be a STEM game-changer.

NATION

Tax Breaks for Big-Box Stores Can Drain Money From Schools

Teaching With Tech Is Hard. Two New Efforts Aim to Help.

DeVos gets an earful from Michigan school superintendents

An unexpected effect of the Common Core: facilitating Jared Kushner’s political awakening

Needy Illinois schools face anxiety over looming state aid cutoff

Judges send transgender bathroom case back to lower court

Hours after gas explosion at Minnehaha Academy, second body is found
Two school workers are killed, and nine people injured as school building collapses after the blast. Warning of a gas leak came seconds earlier.

Felony charges against Oklahoma education official dismissed

Mystery Science partners with Google to bring eclipse glasses to elementary school students

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Weber School District sends $97 million bond question to ballot

OGDEN – The Weber School District Board of Education Wednesday unanimously approved sending a $97 million bond initiative before the voters this fall.
Should voters approve the bond initiative, which will not increase taxes, the district plans to put the money toward five projects:
* A new elementary school in a northern area of Farr West called Remuda – $22 million
* A new elementary school in Pleasant View – $22 million
* A 12-classroom addition on Fremont High School – $5 million
* Renovating Roy Junior High School – $38 million
* An addition at Weber Innovation High School – $10 million
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBc (OSE)

Board proposes boundaries for new Farmington High School
Boundaries adjusted for Bountiful, Viewmont, Woods Cross, Davis, Layton high schools

FARMINGTON – The Davis Board of Education has unveiled the preliminary boundaries for the new Farmington High School.
The boundaries for Bountiful, Davis, Layton, Viewmont and Woods Cross high schools also are being adjusted for the new school, which is being built to accommodate growth in western Davis County.
The preliminary boundaries have been posted on the district website at davis.k12.ut.us/Page/104497. An interactive map, which allows community members to enter a house address to view their high school boundaries, is available at arcg.is/2udR652.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBa (DN)

 

Ogden School District hosting public bond initiative information session

OGDEN – The Ogden School District is holding a public open house to seek community feedback regarding a proposed $106.5 million bond initiative.
The meeting will be held at 6 p.m., Monday, Aug. 7, at New Bridge School, 2150 Jefferson Ave.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBe (OSE)

 

Granite District Raises Property Tax For Teacher Pay

The Granite District School Board has finalized decision to raise the local property tax in order to fund a universal pay raise for teachers.
The board voted unanimously on Tuesday to increase property tax by 12 percent within district boundaries, which covers most of northern Salt Lake County.
This decision, along with increased funding at the state level, allows for an 11 percent raise for all teachers in Granite.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBi (KUER)

 

Law camp at BYU puts teens on trial and in the jury
Law camp aims to prepare teens for leadership and service.

A group of high school teens sat on a jury in federal court in Salt Lake City on Wednesday and returned a verdict in a lawsuit over a student-athlete’s death.
The proceeding actually was a mock trial, but it gave the participants, including a few who played witnesses, a close look at how courts operate.
“It was definitely a unique and exhilarating experience,” said 17-year-old To’alima Mulitalo, of Buena Vista, Va., who played the role of the plaintiff.
The activity was part of the Civics, Law and Leadership Youth Camp hosted by Brigham Young University’s J. Reuben Clark Law School and the Federal Bar Association. The five-day event began Monday and drew about 70 high school students from across the nation, as well as one from Jordan.
The camp – which debuts this year and is based at the BYU campus in Provo – includes learning experiences and talks by a variety of speakers designed to prepare youths for civic leadership and service. BYU law students are serving as mentors to the students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBv (SLT)

 

Ivanka Trump spotlights military spouses’ employment challenges

Washington — When American service members deploy both domestically and abroad, their spouses are faced with challenges of their own, including finding and retaining employment, as well as interrupting their educational and career development. The Trump administration is looking to make things a little easier for the men and women behind those who serve, holding a listening session Wednesday with a group of military spouses led by senior adviser Ivanka Trump.
“When a service member is away, their spouse assumes greatly increased responsibilities, and their commitment and dedication is just as critical in the service about this country. You must often be ready at a moment’s notice to move your families and find new employment,” Trump said to the group gathered around a conference table in the West Wing’s Roosevelt Room. “We are committed to supporting you and ensuring that you have every opportunity to find success in our economy.”
A survey of military families released in June from Hiring Our Heroes, a US Chamber of Commerce foundation, found that unemployment and underemployment are major challenges for spouses of service members, of which 92% are female. The military spouse unemployment rate is 16%, four times the rate for all adult women. Among military spouses who are employed, 14% of them are working in part-time jobs and half of that part-time group wants full-time work.
Frequent moves can deeply impact a spouse’s career choice. For instance, moving six times in eight years “made it quite difficult to be a college basketball coach,” said Elizabeth O’Brien, who now is a Military Spouse Program Director at Hiring Our Heroes.
Another specific challenge military spouses disproportionately face as they move from state to state is licensing continuity, a topic the first daughter is personally focusing on.

Kim Lopez, who has 20 years in teaching experience and a master’s degree, recently moved to Utah with her husband, who is in the Air Force, and is struggling to find employment that matches her qualifications.
“I am having trouble progressing in my field, taking leadership positions, because wherever I go, I start at the bottom. With 20 years of experience, I am lucky if a school district or an employer will take 10 of those as qualified experience, so I am constantly reinventing the wheel,” Lopez said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBx (CNN)

 

ALA Plans Ribbon Cutting For New Addition

American Leadership Academy in Spanish Fork is nearing completion on their new Fine Arts Center and Practice Gym.
The new 18,000 square foot building located next to the stadium will provide a weight room and practice gym for athletes. It will also house many fine arts programs including band and orchestra, dance and choir.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBf (Serve Daily)

 

Late Weber School Board president Brent Richardson leaves foundation with $100K

OGDEN – Weber School District Superintendent Jeff Stephens got emotional as he talked about Brent Richardson at a board meeting Wednesday, Aug. 2.
Richardson, the second-longest serving board member ever, died in July.
“He had been elected and he felt a deep responsibility to those who had put him here and the children of this school district,” Stephens said. “He said ‘I’m either going to serve out my term or serve out my life.’ What a tremendous example for all of us.”
Shortly before his death, Richardson and his wife Diane agreed to donate $100,000 to the Weber School Foundation. The money will be matched by the foundation though it’s unclear yet how large that match will be. The resulting pool of money will be used to create a permanent endowment fund that generates scholarship dollars for students going into the teaching field.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBd (OSE)

 

Provo community mourns teacher’s sudden death

PROVO – A community is coping with a tough loss after a local elementary school teacher’s sudden death.
Christy Yardley was supposed to start teaching sixth grade mid-August, but died on July 28 from complications from a minor surgery, according to her family.
The 40-year-old educator had been a teacher around the world, including teaching in Russia and Taiwan. Yardly had spent the last three years at Rock Canyon Elementary in Provo.
Yardley leaves behind a husband and four children.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBh (KSL)

 

Internet crimes specialist says thousands of Utah kids on adult ‘hook-up’ sites

SALT LAKE CITY -Tens of thousands of teens in Utah are getting on adult dating apps and websites, according to an education specialist in the Utah Attorney General’s Office.
“Most dating apps say they’re a dating app,” said Michelle Busch-Upwall, who teaches online safety to parents, community groups, and churches. “Most of them are hook-up apps. That’s all they’re looking for.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBw (KUTV)

 

Give school supplies to kids in need at Pack the Bus, Backpack Bonanza events

OGDEN – There’s an easy way to raise your spirits in the next week by investing in a few crayons, binders and backpacks to help children in need.
United Way of Northern Utah and Catholic Community Services of Northern Utah are collecting school supplies for the annual Backpack Bonanza, an event that channels donations to kids in need. They hope to collect supplies for more than 2,000 local children.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBb (OSE)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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What should preschoolers learn before going to kindergarten
Deseret News commentary by columnists Linda and Richard Eyre

It’s been a lot of years ago, but we remember it well – sitting in our living room in McLean, Virginia, talking with a group of friends about the preschool-aged kids we all had at the time, and about what kind of preschool we should enroll them in.
The Washington, D.C, area was a hotbed for early academics, and we had all received ads and circulars and fliers touting various preschools – all of them promising to teach our 3- and 4-year-olds to read, or to do math, or to develop good study habits – all based on the assumption that the best thing parents could do for these little kids was to give them an academic head start, to make sure they were the smartest kids in their kindergarten class when they started school in a couple of years.
I remember one particular advertisement that came in our mail that started, “Want to get your child into Harvard? Better get on our waiting list now!” It was an ad for a preschool that apparently had managed to get address lists from the maternity ward of the local hospital. Our baby was 3 weeks old when the ad showed up in our mailbox. So, before they turn a month old, start preparing them for college, right?
Well, we weren’t so sure.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aB9

 

Educating teens regarding the harms of pornography
Serve Daily commentary by Miriam Hall, Miss Springville/Mapleton

As Miss Springville/Mapleton, my service platform is “Education on the Harms of Pornography.” Fight the New Drug (FTND) is the primary organization that I have partnered with to aid families in learning how to protect themselves from pornography.
FTND is an anti-pornography, non-profit organization that provides facts, personal accounts, and science-based information to spread the the message about the harmful effects of pornography.
They are the initiators of the “Porn Kills Love” movement, and their primary focus centers on showing how pornography affects the brain exactly like a drug, how it negatively affects relationships, and how it impacts society as a whole.
FTND gives live, age-appropriate presentations in school assembly settings. Thanks to the generous donations of many Springville and Mapleton businesses, these presentations are coming to all of the Jr. highs and high schools in Springville and Mapleton. FTND will also hold parent meetings in conjunction with the student assemblies.
These presentations will educate over 4,000 teens and their parents on how to protect themselves from pornography and fight pornography addiction.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBg

 

How OER Is Boosting School Performance and Equity From the Suburbs to the Arctic
Open Educational Resources – free, high-quality materials – are a windfall to remote and poor schools
The 74 commentary by LAYLA BONNOT, collaboratives manager at CCSSO

Kotzebue, a village in Northern Alaska, knows the meaning of “challenge” when it comes to education. The remote community is part of the Northwest Arctic Borough School District, which serves about 2,000 students who come from 11 villages of Inupiaq Eskimos spread across an area the size of Virginia. Schools in Kotz (as the locals call it) are “off the road system,” which means everything is flown in or arrives by boat when the rivers melt.
Along with the geographic challenges, districts across the state face budget cuts to education because of decreasing oil prices. This means Alaskans need to think creatively about how to ensure the availability of top-tier instruction and access to high-quality materials, especially for students in the most remote areas like Kotz.
In my role at the Council of Chief State School Officers I have the opportunity to visit schools across the country – from isolated Kotz to bustling Washington, D.C. – and see how educators are sharing knowledge and working to help their students succeed. One practice that is gaining traction is the use of open educational resources (known as OER) – freely available, high-quality materials that can be downloaded, edited, and shared to support teaching and learning.
With OER, districts can adapt content to meet their local needs, maximize education budgets, and ensure access to resources and educational rigor. By being able to serve all students – whatever their race, gender, ethnicity, language, disability, family background, or family income – OER supports the goal of educational equity.
As OER has taken root, I’ve witnessed firsthand how innovative districts are using them to address many challenges – helping students learn with the most up-to-date materials, allowing teachers to do more with limited time, and adapting resources to meet the needs of diverse learners at varied levels, some whose first language is not English-all in the face of budget cuts.
For example, veteran science teacher John Coe and his colleagues at North Lake Middle School in Lake Stevens, Washington, saw an instructional need that was not being addressed by their traditional textbooks. In 2013, they began using OER. With OER, Coe says, “we can edit down the sections of text quickly. We can create leveled readings [that] help solve some of the differences in reading levels … and give relevance to the text.” Now, student performance levels on eighth-grade state assessments are 10 percent to 15 percent higher than those in neighboring districts.
Another example is Career Path High School in Kaysville, Utah, where teachers have been integrating high-quality OER into their classrooms since 2009. School Director Robyn Bagley believes that “OER can absolutely have an impact on student learning [because] teachers have more and more free resources available to bring courses to life.” OER can improve learning for all students: At Career Path, OER designed by specialists in educating students with disabilities has helped the school’s teachers reach students on a deeper level.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBt

I Failed the System: Representation, Meritocracy and Changing Education from the Top Down
Diverse Issues in Higher Education op-ed by Alex Serna, program director for Breakthrough San Juan Capistrano

The glistening ruby red dice bounced off the wall, “eleven!” I exclaimed as I won the round of craps, walking away one dollar richer. It was fourth-period geometry and the last thing on my mind were theorems or angles. From my vantage point it was all a waste of time because I sucked at math and wasn’t going to college.
For me, all of high school was pointless. I was never going to succeed and I was pretty adamant on not caring to succeed. I was a drop in the ocean in the grandiose education system that I was a part of, from 16,025 school districts, serving approximately 50.4 million students in public elementary and secondary schools, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. The educational ecosystem including advocacy, nonprofits, foundations, think tanks, management and technology organizations make the whole sector an expansive enterprise with exponential impact.
I was raised in a low-income Latino/a family, both my parents emigrating from Mexico in the 1970s and becoming U.S. citizens in the 2000s. The two things that I heard every day were “clean your room” and “you’re going to college.” Little did they know that their son was playing dice in class, getting detention for skipping class and bringing whiskey in his Frappuccino to Saturday School for skipping said detention.
“If you work hard, never give up and stay out of trouble you’ll be successful,” my dad used to tell me. A meritocratic system he thought would change my life, but I couldn’t fit the “college mold,” so I just gave up. I thought I failed the system and not the other way around. And, there are many first-generation, working-class youth giving up every day because they feel the same way. I couldn’t tell you why I felt that way back then, but now, I have a clarity that teenage me could never fathom. I know now that the education system failed me and needs to change from the top-down.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBr

 

Cybersecurity badge: One big step for Girl Scouts, potentially giant leap for women
Girls need to see themselves in the role of white-hat hackers to even the virtual playing field. This badge could be a STEM game-changer.
USA Today op-ed by Lara S. Schmidt, RAND Corporation director of the Strategy, Policy and Operations Program of the Homeland Security Operational Analysis Center

My association with the Girl Scouts has spanned decades – as a scout, camp counselor, steadfast cookie connoisseur and now donor. It is an experience strongly associated with the great outdoors. Cook meals on a campfire? Check. Hike long distances wearing a heavy backpack? Check. Lead two dozen 5-year-olds for a week in a woodland camp? Check. In adulthood, all of those experiences stayed with me, and I put them to use in the wilderness and in my work as a cybersecurity researcher for the RAND Corporation.
Scouting has always given girls opportunities that challenge them and allow their leadership skills to develop. But the modern world – with its headlines about Russians hacking our elections and disruptive prank email impersonations of White House staffers – can seem far removed from a Girl Scout camp. So imagine my delight when the Girl Scouts announced they would be offering 18 cybersecurity badges to expose girls to information-age concepts and challenges.
This heartening development is more than just an indication of changing times, more than just updating badge programs to replace the outmoded with the modern. This is a way for more girls to obtain valuable hands-on experience with the concepts that are shaping the modern world. The service ethos Girl Scouts have always embodied and championed can now “go viral” as many as 1.8 million girls are given the chance to learn to protect themselves and their community in cyberspace.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBk

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Tax Breaks for Big-Box Stores Can Drain Money From Schools
Education Week

Paying attention to how much nearby corporate retailers pay in property taxes may not be a priority for most school district leaders, but some policymakers think that could change soon.
Across the country, retailers-in particular big-box stores-are pushing back on how local governments assess the value of their properties with the goal of lowering their tax bills. Using a tactic known as “dark store theory,” retailers and their legal teams are increasingly arguing that the massive stores they operate ought to be appraised as if they were vacant or “dark.” When they succeed, the annual property taxes that retailers pay-which help fund public schools in most local communities-can drop precipitously.
The retailers, most of them corporate giants such as Target, Lowe’s, and Home Depot, contend the large buildings their stores occupy-typically more than 100,000 square feet-are difficult to sell because they are customized to a particular retailer. They argue their stores, even brand new and bustling with business, shouldn’t be assessed at the “best and highest use”-which is how most assessors determine how much tax they owe-but at a rate similar to the resale value of box store properties that may be shuttered. It’s an argument that some assessors find absurd and an abuse of the tax code.
So far, the strategy has worked, particularly in the courts, and has led to lowering the taxes of big-box companies by hundreds of millions of dollars, according to interviews with assessors and lawmakers in several states who have analyzed the effects.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBl

 

Teaching With Tech Is Hard. Two New Efforts Aim to Help.
Education Week

Two big players in the education-technology field unveiled new efforts in recent days to better help teachers use technology in the classroom.
For Karen Cator, the president and CEO of Digital Promise, it’s about using coaches to bridge the “second-level digital divide” between affluent schools who use tech for collaboration and problem-solving and lower-income schools that use tech for drill-and-practice. With a $6.5 million grant from Google’s nonprofit philanthropic arm, the ed-tech advocacy group launched last week its new Dynamic Learning Project. The idea is to embed former classroom teachers inside 50 low-income middle schools, where they will be dedicated full-time to helping staff learn to use technology in “transformative ways.”
At Summit Public Schools, meanwhile, it’s about building a pipeline of new teachers ready to hit the ground running in schools that are embracing new instructional models based on tailoring the learning experience to each individual student. The California-based charter school network announced last week a new Summit Learning Teacher Residency program, which it is billing as “the nation’s first personalized-learning teacher residency.”
Both efforts seek to address a big, broad challenge that remains front and center for the ed-tech-and-innovation field: How to get more than the most-enthusiastic teachers to adapt to new ways of teaching, using the power of new technologies.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aB7

 

DeVos gets an earful from Michigan school superintendents
Detroit Free Press

Betsy DeVos had a simple question for a couple dozen Michigan superintendents who had her ear during a round table discussion today: She wanted to know how she can best serve their students.
What did she learn? Control is important.
“I left the meeting reassured that giving local leaders more control is important to improving education for every student in America,” DeVos, the West Michigan native who is U.S. Secretary of Education, said in a news release from the U.S. Department of Education.
DeVos reportedly met with the superintendents during an unpublicized event in Grand Rapids, according to the news release.
The names of the superintendents were not released. Detroit Superintendent Nikolai Vitti said he didn’t attend because of a prior commitment.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aB1

http://gousoe.uen.org/aB2 (Grand Rapids [MI] Press)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aBj (ED)

 

An unexpected effect of the Common Core: facilitating Jared Kushner’s political awakening
Chalkbeat

President Trump campaigned on the (impossible-to-keep) promise of doing away with the Common Core, but until recently his son-in-law and senior advisor Jared Kushner was totally on board with the learning standards.
Kushner told White House interns this week that he had been convinced by people he knew in New York City who backed the standards and wanted to see them adopted in all 50 states.
But as he traveled the country with his father-in-law, he discovered that not everyone agreed with him. “What it did for me was really make me explore my positions,” Kushner said in an off-the-record talk that was swiftly leaked to reporters.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBq

 

Needy Illinois schools face anxiety over looming state aid cutoff
Reuters

CHICAGO – Illinois’ most financially distressed school districts appear capable of opening on schedule this month, but some may face shutdowns in September and possible bond-rating downgrades if $6.7 billion in state education funding remains frozen by a new round of political deadlock.
The nation’s fifth-largest state, which recently ended a record-setting two-year budget impasse when schools were fully funded, now faces a new financial crisis triggered by Republican Governor Bruce Rauner’s veto of a Democratic-backed school-funding overhaul.
His move leaves Illinois without a budget for its schools for the current fiscal year and could disrupt state aid for 850-plus districts that educate 2 million students, including the nation’s third-largest school system in Chicago.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aAZ

http://gousoe.uen.org/aB0 (Chicago Sun-Times)

 

Judges send transgender bathroom case back to lower court
Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. – A federal lawsuit over a transgender teen’s demand to use the boy’s bathroom at his high school is being sent back to a lower court.
The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals had scheduled arguments for September in Gavin Grimm’s case against the Gloucester County School Board.
But the 4th Circuit said Wednesday that it will delay next month’s arguments and send the case back to the district court so the judge can decide whether the case is now moot because Grimm recently graduated.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aB3

http://gousoe.uen.org/aB4 (Richmond [VA] Times-Dispatch)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aB5 (WaPo)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aB6 (Reuters)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aBm (Ed Week)

 

Hours after gas explosion at Minnehaha Academy, second body is found
Two school workers are killed, and nine people injured as school building collapses after the blast. Warning of a gas leak came seconds earlier.
Minneapolis Star Tribune

Minnehaha Academy senior Chimali Day was in the school counselor’s office, her parents by her side, when the sudden warning came.
“Get out!” a staffer cried, breaking the Wednesday morning calm on the upper school campus. “There’s a gas leak.”
Day leapt for the door just as the center of the south Minneapolis private school building exploded, the blast knocking her to the floor. Her mother jumped on top of her, instinctively sheltering her child with her body. Then they scrambled through the back door of the counseling office while Day’s father went looking for her classmates.
The teenager was among the students and staff who escaped the natural gas explosion that killed receptionist Ruth Berg, 47, and janitor John F. Carlson, 82, and injured nine other people, one critically. Fire officials said the two bodies were found near each other, both on the south side of the rubble.
Staff and parents at the Christian school along the Mississippi River gathered together to grieve Wednesday night, even as they gave thanks that fall classes were not yet in session when the blast occurred.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aB8

Felony charges against Oklahoma education official dismissed
Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY- Felony charges of illegally raising campaign money against Oklahoma’s top public education official have been dismissed.
Online court records show the charges were dismissed Tuesday against Republican Superintendent Joy Hofmeister, two political consultants, a former union leader and the former head of a schools group.
Hofmeister and the others were accused of conspiring to funnel money from a donor corporation and two education groups into a fund to finance a negative campaign ad against her GOP opponent in a 2014 primary. It is illegal in Oklahoma for a candidate to coordinate such expenditures.
Hofmeister pleaded not guilty. She thanked supporters during a news conference Tuesday and called the charges unjust and untrue.
But Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater says the case remains under investigation and could be refiled.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBn

http://gousoe.uen.org/aBo (Tulsa [OK] World)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aBp (Ed Week)

 

Mystery Science partners with Google to bring eclipse glasses to elementary school students
TechCrunch

Assuming you haven’t been living in a cave – in which case this news wouldn’t interest you anyway – you know there’s a solar eclipse happening on August 21st. It’s the first solar eclipse to cross the United States since 1918 and the last one before 2045, so it’s no surprise that a lot of people are quite excited about this one. Unsurprisingly, a large number of science teachers are also getting ready to turn this into a teachable moment, but to do so, they do need to be able to give their students eclipse glasses – because the last thing you’d want is a bunch of kids staring right into the sun without protection.
It’s no secret that Google has teamed up with a number of organizations, including the Gordon and Betty Moore foundation, SSI, the National Science Foundation and NASA, to distribute 2 million of these solar-viewing glasses to almost 5,000 libraries throughout the country. In addition to this, Google has also teamed up with Mystery Science, a Y Combinator-incubated startup that provides lesson plans to teachers, to directly ship up to 15,000 free glasses to elementary schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aBs

 

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CALENDAR
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UEN News
http://www.uen.org

August 3:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

August 4:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

August 22:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

August 23:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

September 19:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

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