Education News Roundup: Aug. 23, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Silicon Slopes is making its voice heard in STEM education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEh (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aEn (KUER)

Trib takes a look at American Preparatory Academy first day back.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEg (SLT)

CNN looks at the nation’s teacher shortage.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEb (CNN)

Latest data from NCES? “The average start time for public schools was 8:10 am. Nationally, only about 4 percent of schools had start times before 7:30 am. This early start was more common among schools with 1,000 or more students (14 percent) than all public schools (4 percent). It was also substantially more common among high schools (10 percent) than among primary (2 percent), middle (7 percent), or combined (4 percent) schools.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aE7 (NCES)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Silicon Slopes moves to give Utah tech leaders a greater voice in education, public policy

Its new campus unfinished as school year starts, American Preparatory Academy in Draper works to manage traffic, overcrowding
Line of cars stretches down Lone Peak Parkway and faculty members direct drivers after incomplete permitting, construction snags delay new high school campus to mid-October.

Juvenile Justice Reforms Have School Administrators Wondering How to Discipline Kids

Educator hopes her adapted board games can help students feel included

Crestview Elementary celebrates start of school with ‘awesome’ eclipse party

Utah school district employees prepare for 1st day of class

PCSD hires communications director

OPINION & COMMENTARY

A reason to celebrate in the Ogden School District

America’s economy needs more than STEM

‘Back to school’

The Dixie myth

New Data on U.S. Public Schools from the National Teacher and Principal Survey

NATION

Schools throughout the country are grappling with teacher shortage, data show

Civil War lessons often depend on where the classroom is

State could seize control or close campuses if four Dallas ISD schools don’t improve

DeVos Invested in Company Under Investigation for Misleading Claims

Career and Technical Education Faces Challenges in Rural America

The Private School Market Is Overwhelmingly a Small-School Market

Teaching Kids Coding, by the Book

VR, AR, 3D Printing and Data Analytics Overtake Visual Tech Market in Education

State denies application for charter school for jailed teens in 9-0 vote

Positive Early Home Environment Predicts Later Academic Success, Study Finds

NTSB: Worker urged evacuation before Minnesota school blast

Devil worshiper files lawsuit against Putnam City Schools

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Silicon Slopes moves to give Utah tech leaders a greater voice in education, public policy

The nonprofit Silicon Slopes wants the state’s tech leaders to play a bigger role in guiding public policy in Utah, announcing two new partnerships this week that will help the industry shape education, legislation and other issues.
Silicon Slopes and the Salt Lake Chamber said Tuesday they will work together on business and community challenges, from developing the state’s workforce to clearing the air.
On Wednesday, Silicon Slopes will host the announcement of a new Pathways program to help high school students and adults gain coding experience and other skills they need for tech careers.
The Governor’s Office of Economic Development (GOED) has previously launched aerospace and diesel technician Pathways programs.
“We’re working with GOED to figure out how we solve this talent gap we have in the state of Utah,” said Clint Betts, executive director and editor in chief at Silicon Slopes. “The Pathway program gives opportunities to kids who otherwise wouldn’t have had those opportunities to [join] this amazing community that’s been built in the tech industry.”
While the program is still in the design stage, Betts said it will help address the three main issues facing Utah’s tech industry: diversity, recruiting and education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEh (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aEn (KUER)

 

Its new campus unfinished as school year starts, American Preparatory Academy in Draper works to manage traffic, overcrowding
Line of cars stretches down Lone Peak Parkway and faculty members direct drivers after incomplete permitting, construction snags delay new high school campus to mid-October.

Draper – By 7:45 a.m. Monday, the line of cars entering American Preparatory Academy had turned a half-mile stretch of Lone Peak Parkway into a 10-minute crawl of bumper-to-bumper traffic.
And as vehicles reached the school, vest-clad faculty members directed drivers along a serpentine route to designated drop-off stations where parents made their goodbyes through open windows before hurrying to get out of the way.
“We’re getting everybody ready for this afternoon,” school director Kevin McVicar said Monday of the drop-off and pick-up system. “Once everybody knows [the process] and understands it, you can come back and you’ll be able to see how it flows.”
Traffic is not a new challenge for the Draper charter school, which has seen its efforts to connect to an adjacent, stoplight-equipped road frustrated by a yearslong property dispute that has raised major legal issues and sparked neighborhood controversy.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEg (SLT)

 

Juvenile Justice Reforms Have School Administrators Wondering How to Discipline Kids

As Utah students go back to school this week administrators are still determining how to deal with those who are disruptive or chronically truant. Sweeping juvenile justice reforms passed this year require schools to find new ways to discipline kids without sending them to court.
Reforms state lawmakers passed this year dictate that schools can no longer refer kids to court for truancy. It puts a cap on fines and community service hours for youth sentenced for some offenses and limits the amount of time youth can be kept in juvenile detention or secure confinement. The American Civil Liberties Union of Utah and other non-profit groups are handing out brochures to help administrators and parents understand the new rules. The ACLU’s Anna Thomas says she wants to make sure the law is implemented appropriately.
“We wanted to time it with the start of school because as kids head back to the classroom that’s where a lot of misconduct is noticed by government agencies and gets kids referred into the juvenile justice system,” Thomas says.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEo (KUER)

 

Educator hopes her adapted board games can help students feel included

MILLCREEK – A Mill Creek Elementary School educator is going the extra mile to make her students feel included and excited for the new school year.
Katie Chevalier is a teacher’s aide for the school’s special education class for students who are blind and visually impaired. Last school year, she was heartbroken to see one of her students struggling to play a board game with others in the class.
“One of my students was left out, and she only has light perception and wasn’t able to play,” Chevalier said.
So Chevalier came up with a plan and spent the entire summer adapting two dozen board games to fit her students’ needs. With a Perkins Braille writer and feel-and-peel stickers, she added Braille to game after game. She also added Velcro to game boards and pieces to make it easier for her students move their pieces.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEm (KSL)

 

Crestview Elementary celebrates start of school with ‘awesome’ eclipse party

HOLLADAY – As first days of school go, Monday at Crestview Elementary School rocked – an eclipse viewing party followed by an all-school picnic.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEi (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aEl (KUTV)

 

Utah school district employees prepare for 1st day of class

SALT LAKE CITY – Administrators are racing to finish cleaning, fixing and upgrading buildings ahead of most Utah public schools starting a new academic year this week, a difficult task that includes scraping gum off of desks, sprucing up playing fields and finishing summer construction projects.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEk (AP via CVD)

 

PCSD hires communications director

The Park City School District has hired Melinda Colton as its communications director. According to a press release, she will be the first person to hold that post full time. Colton has an extensive background in communications and education, having served as public relations director for Utah Valley University and communications director for the Jordan School District. “We feel fortunate to have found an experienced communications professional,” said Superintendent Ember Conley in the release. “We are eager to increase engagement and communication with our stakeholders and this hire is an initial step toward more informed taxpayers.” Colton added that she’s thrilled to be back in public education. “I’m excited to share the success stories of Park City School District,” she said. “There are great things happening in Park City schools thanks to great teachers and administrators who devote their lives to education.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEw (PR)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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A reason to celebrate in the Ogden School District
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

The Ogden School District did something remarkable – it improved its graduation rate by 7 percentage points.
Any district would celebrate a number like that. But it’s especially gratifying for Ogden, which reported Utah’s worst graduation rate in 2016.
Ogden’s graduation rate jumped from 67 percent a year ago to nearly 74 percent in 2017, Superintendent Rich Nye announced at an Aug. 17 board meeting.
“This really speaks to the dedication of staff and community and this board to improving the lives of students, following them along to make sure they have what it takes to be successful in graduation,” Nye said, reporting the district’s preliminary figures.
All of which is true.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aE8

America’s economy needs more than STEM
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner op-ed by JEFF STEAGALL, dean of Weber State University’s John B. Goddard School of Business & Economics and a professor of economics

For several years, government and education have touted the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics disciplines as the saviors of the American economy. By devoting more educational resources into STEM fields, the argument goes, America will position itself to stay on the cutting edge of the exciting new technologies that will form the heart of the 21st century economy.
The argument has considerable validity. American students’ mathematics scores have been falling for decades when compared to those of K-12 students in other countries. It is important to motivate students to do better by demonstrating how it can lead to good jobs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEj

 

‘Back to school’
Utah Policy commentary by EDCUtah President & CEO Theresa Foxley

The evenings are crisp, the BBQ grills are hot, and college football is right around the corner: yep, ready or not it’s back to school time.
As Utah’s ~600,000 primary school aged children return to the classroom this week, I thought I’d take a minute to discuss the Our Schools Now initiative. In the decade or so since I’ve observed the State’s economic development organizations, there’s only a handful of times I can recall EDCUtah getting involved in major policy discussions. Our organization is the beneficiary of highly competent state and local leaders who give us an amazing product to market so we generally aren’t compelled to weigh-in. However, there is one notable exception to the general rule, and that is to support the Our Schools Now initiative as a way to spur dialogue around statewide education funding. Two years ago, the EDCUtah board voted to support the measure and our Board recently reaffirmed our organization’s support.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEx

 

The Dixie myth
St. George News commentary by columnist Ed Kociela

There’s a reason why Southern Utah’s Dixie has such pitiful diversity numbers.
The notion that the area was given the nickname simply because of its warm climate and cotton-growing history is myth.
The man dispatched to help settle the region that would become known as Utah’s Dixie in 1857, Robert Dockery Covington, was not sent as a result of spiritual revelation or divine inspiration, he was sent to replicate the cotton industry of the Old South. It would give the Mormon settlers a cut of the lucrative trade that was in jeopardy as the nation crept ever-closer to the Civil War.
He was, according to historians cited in an archived 2012 Salt Lake Tribune story, sent because he and his father had run what historians have described as a “large successful plantation” growing cotton and tobacco in Noxubee County, Mississippi, where he served as a slave overseer. Antagonists and apologists have a divided view on Covington, who has, needless to say, become a controversial figure in Southern Utah history.
The cotton enterprise eventually collapsed, however the region would retain the moniker Utah’s Dixie.
Despite the romanticism and lore, the Dixie of the Old South was not a kinder, gentler or honorable place.

Through all of this, the connection to the Old South was strong in Southern Utah where the schools in Iron and Washington counties would put on annual minstrel shows, with the supposedly educated faculty and administration decked out in black-face makeup entertaining the community. There were statues erected at the college to honor the Confederacy. It was common to see large Confederate flags flying over businesses across the region. The St. George mayor, between giving cheerleader speeches about the “Dixie Spirit,” would lead crowds in singing “Are You From Dixie?” We’ve got Dixie High School, Dixie State University and a plethora of businesses with Dixie in their titles. Until 2005, the college athletic teams were known as the Dixie Rebels.
So, is it a surprise to learn that the African-American population in Iron and Washington counties is a pitiful 0.6 percent? Is it any wonder why the Hispanic population sits at just under 10 percent? Is it a shock to learn that 2.2 percent of the DSU students are of African-American descent and 9.3 percent with Hispanic heritage?
Would you want to live, work or attend school where the numbers are so stacked against you?
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEy

New Data on U.S. Public Schools from the National Teacher and Principal Survey
National Center for Education Statistics analysis

There were more than 90,000 public schools in the United States during the 2015-16 school year, serving nearly 49.3 million students in kindergarten through grade 12, according to a new report released today (Aug. 22). Nearly all of these schools had at least one student receiving special education services and about three-quarters offered instruction specifically for English language learners.
The National Center for Education Statistics released Characteristics of Public Elementary and Secondary Schools in the United States: Results From the 2015-16 National Teacher and Principal Survey. The 2015-16 National Teacher and Principal Survey (NTPS) is a nationally representative sample survey of public K-12 schools, principals, and teachers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia.
This First Look report provides tables containing descriptive information regarding public schools. Key findings in the report include:

  • During the 2015-16 school year, there were an estimated 90,400 K-12 public schools in the United States, including 83,500 traditional public and 6,900 public charter schools. These schools served nearly 49.3 million students, with about 46.2 million in traditional public schools and another 3 million in public charter schools;
  • About 99 percent of public schools had at least one student with an Individual Education Plan (IEP) because of special needs. Additionally, 76 percent of public schools had instruction specifically designed to address the needs of English language learner (ELL) or limited English proficient (LEP) students;
  • Nationwide, about 21 percent of public schools offered at least one course entirely online. This was more common among public charter schools (29 percent) than it was among traditional public schools (20 percent). Offering one or more classes that were entirely online was much more common among high (58 percent) or combined (64 percent) schools, and very small (45 percent) or very large (44 percent) schools than for all public schools (21 percent);
  • Including full-time and part-time staff, public schools employed an estimated 124,420 school counselors, 66,320 psychologists, and 44,920 social workers. They also employed 96,440 speech therapists and 84,020 nurses, as well as 73,580 librarians/library media specialists and 80,920 instructional coordinators and supervisors; and
  • The average start time for public schools was 8:10 am. Nationally, only about 4 percent of schools had start times before 7:30 am. This early start was more common among schools with 1,000 or more students (14 percent) than all public schools (4 percent). It was also substantially more common among high schools (10 percent) than among primary (2 percent), middle (7 percent), or combined (4 percent) schools.

http://gousoe.uen.org/aE7

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Schools throughout the country are grappling with teacher shortage, data show
CNN

Lynn Sorrells started teaching 26 years ago because she loved seeing the light-bulb moment when a kid grasped a new concept.
She still does. But as principal of a high school in Dorchester County, Maryland, she is struggling to find an algebra and geometry teacher just weeks before her school year is set to begin.
As students head back to school, Sorrells’ district is one of hundreds across the country grappling with a growing teacher shortage — especially in key areas such as math and special ed.
“Currently, there are not enough qualified teachers applying for teaching jobs to meet the demand in all locations and fields,” said the Learning Policy Institute, a national education think tank, in a research brief in September.
Some schools, such as in New York City, are being forced to increase class sizes, which some studies show can reduce how much a student learns.
The institute estimated last year that if trends continue, there could be a nationwide shortfall of 112,000 teachers by 2018.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEb

 

Civil War lessons often depend on where the classroom is
Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas – The Civil War lessons taught to American students often depend on where the classroom is, with schools presenting accounts of the conflict that vary from state to state and even district to district.
Some schools emphasize states’ rights in addition to slavery and stress how economic and cultural differences stoked tensions between North and South. Others highlight the battlefield acumen of Confederate commanders alongside their Union counterparts. At least one suggests that abolition represented the first time the nation lived up to its founding ideals.
The differences don’t always break down neatly along geographic lines.
“You don’t know, as you speak to folks around the country, what kind of assumptions they have about things like the Civil War,” said Dustin Kidd, a sociology professor at Temple University in Philadelphia.
Lessons on the war and its causes usually begin in the fifth through eighth grades. That means attitudes toward the war may be influenced by what people learned at an age when many were choosing a favorite color or imagining what they wanted to be when they grew up.
The effect may not be obvious until a related issue is thrust into the spotlight like this month’s violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, and the resulting backlash against Confederate symbols.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEq

 

State could seize control or close campuses if four Dallas ISD schools don’t improve
Dallas Morning News

Despite making big strides with its lowest-performing campuses, Dallas ISD still has a massive task for the upcoming school year: If four campuses don’t do better, the state will either shut them down or take over the whole district.
“The statute provides no discretion,” wrote Texas education commissioner and former DISD trustee Mike Morath, in a letter sent last week to Superintendent Michael Hinojosa and school board President Dan Micciche.
The four long-struggling schools must perform better on state assessments and shake off the “improvement required” label for the upcoming school year or the state will be required to act. Three DISD schools have been on the state’s failing list for five years – Carr and Titche elementary schools and Edison Middle Learning Center – and one elementary campus has missed marks for four years: J.W. Ray Learning Center.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aE9

 

DeVos Invested in Company Under Investigation for Misleading Claims
Education Week

When U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos increased her family’s financial stake in Neurocore this spring, the controversial “neurofeedback” company was under investigation by an advertising-industry self-regulatory group for making questionable claims about its treatments for such conditions as autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and memory loss.
Following a months-long review of the evidence behind Neurocore’s assertions, the National Advertising Division formally recommended in July that the company stop making a wide range of advertising claims and stop promoting many of its user testimonials.
“NAD concluded that the advertiser’s evidence was insufficiently reliable to substantiate [its] strong health-related claims,” according to the group’s 17-page decision. “As a result, NAD recommended that all of the challenged claims be discontinued.”
Neurocore is appealing the decision.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEr

 

Career and Technical Education Faces Challenges in Rural America
Education Week

Rural schools face special challenges trying to build good career and technical education programs, especially programs that include postsecondary training, an important element in an economy that increasingly demands more schooling than a high school diploma.
A new brief outlines the difficulties of offering a high-quality career-tech-ed option for students, and examines how four states-Nebraska, South Dakota, Mississippi, and Idaho-are working to overcome those difficulties. Assembled by four organizations that focus on career tech ed, the paper is the first in a series that will explore issues confronting CTE programs in the rural United States.
The dearth of colleges in rural areas is a pivotal challenge to career and technical education programs, the paper notes. Rural areas are home to half the country’s school districts, but only 16 percent of its two-year degree-granting colleges, the paper says.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEu

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEv (Advance CTE)

The Private School Market Is Overwhelmingly a Small-School Market
Education Week

Selling into private schools in the U.S. often means having to sell into small schools.
That’s one of the incontrovertible takeaways from a new trove of data about private schools released by the National Center for Education Statistics, the chief statistical office of the U.S. Department of Education.
Private elementary and secondary schools serve a total of about 4.9 million students today, roughly one-tenth of the 50 million served by U.S. public schools.
Of the 34,576 total private schools, the vast majority, 87 percent of them, serve fewer than 300 students, according to the federal data. And the biggest proportion of private schools, 46.3 percent, are very small-enrolling fewer than 50 students.
Just 6 percent of private schools have more than 500 students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aE5

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/aE6 (NCES)

Teaching Kids Coding, by the Book
New York Times

One sunny summer morning this month, a group of 20 teenage girls gathered in a conference room in the sleek offices of a tech company in Manhattan. It was their fifth week of coding camp, and they were huddled around laptops, brainstorming designs for their final projects. One group was building a computer game that simulates the experience of going through life with depression and anxiety, while others were drafting plans for websites that track diversity at companies and help connect newly arrived immigrants with local community groups.
They were working intently when Reshma Saujani, the founder and chief executive of the nonprofit organization Girls Who Code, dropped in to offer some encouragement.
“How many of you take computer science class at your schools?” she asked. Hands shot up. “Are you the only girls in your class?” she asked. Most of the girls nodded.
Over the past five years, some 40,000 girls have learned to code through the organization’s summer camps and afterschool programs. But Ms. Saujani wanted to expand the group’s reach, and was looking for new ways to recruit girls into the tech industry.
For a tech evangelist, her solution was surprisingly retro and analog: books. Girls Who Code is creating a publishing franchise, and plans to release 13 books over the next two years through a multibook deal with Penguin. The titles range from board books and picture books for babies and elementary school children, to nonfiction coding manuals, activity books and journals, and a series of novels featuring girl coders.
This week, the organization is releasing its first two books – an illustrated nonfiction coding manual by Ms. Saujani, and a novel, “The Friendship Code,” which features a group of girls who become friends in an after-school coding club.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEa

 

VR, AR, 3D Printing and Data Analytics Overtake Visual Tech Market in Education
THE Journal

While visual technologies in education are expected to steadily grow each year through 2021, the majority of the market will comprise virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), 3D printing and visual data analytics products, according to a new industry forecast.
The latest industry report from Technavio predicts the visual tech market in education will grow 33 percent through the forecast period 2017-2021. VR, AR, 3D printing and visual data analytics are the top four product segments – already accounting for more than 65 percent of the market as of last year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEf

 

State denies application for charter school for jailed teens in 9-0 vote
Huntsville (AL) Times

A proposed public charter school for jailed teens won’t move forward after the Alabama Public Charter School Commission denied its application.
This morning, the commission voted 9-0 to deny the application for Teen’s Path to Success, a tax-exempt organization that would have served incarcerated teens and young adults up to age 21 in county jails statewide.
It would have received nearly $10,000 per pupil in public funds and had a projected revenue of $3.43 million in its first year, and more than $5 million by year 5.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEe

 

Positive Early Home Environment Predicts Later Academic Success, Study Finds
Education Week

A new study finds that children’s home environment in infancy and toddlerhood can predict their academic skills by 5th grade.
Researchers from New York University studied more than 2,200 families enrolled in the Early Head Start Research Evaluation Project. They followed children from birth through 5th grade to determine the impact of early home-learning environments on later academic success.
Their study was published online this month in the journal Applied Developmental Science.
All of the children in the study came from low-income, ethnically diverse families. The researchers found that children whose parents engaged them in meaningful conversations and provided them with books and toys designed to increase learning were much more likely to develop early cognitive skills that led to later academic success.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEs

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEt (Applied Developmental Science) $

NTSB: Worker urged evacuation before Minnesota school blast
Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS – A maintenance worker at a Minneapolis school that partially collapsed after an explosion earlier this month had smelled natural gas and used a radio to tell others to evacuate less than a minute before the blast, according to preliminary report released Monday by the National Transportation Safety Board.
Two longtime school employees died in the Aug. 2 collapse at Minnehaha Academy.
The preliminary report doesn’t identify the maintenance worker who urged people to evacuate, but the school identified him as Don DuBois, a Minnehaha Academy alum.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEc

http://gousoe.uen.org/aEd (WSJ) $

 

Devil worshiper files lawsuit against Putnam City Schools
(Oklahoma City) Oklahoman

The leader of a group that once held an event described as a Satanic “black mass” at the Civic Center has filed a lawsuit against a school district alleging that his family has been subjected to a barrage of harassment because of their “alternative non-Christian-based religion.”
In a lawsuit filed Monday in Oklahoma County District Court, Adam Daniels, with his wife Kelsey Daniels, alleges that several Putnam City School District employees at several schools have mistreated their three children and made repeated false allegations about their parenting to the Department of Human Services.
The Daniels are seeking a $300,000 judgment.
“The District has taken an adversarial stance toward the Parents of these children based largely on the fact that the Parents practice an alternative religion which is a violation of the Civil Rights of the Plaintiffs,” the lawsuit alleges.
“Parent Plaintiffs were subjected to approximately 40 visits from DHS Child Protective Services of a period of years which were based on falsified allegations purported by District personnel.”
The suit also alleges the district failed to provide protection for the Daniels’ children from bullying and mistreatment by students and teachers and that the family was asked if they maintain a “dungeon.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEp

 

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CALENDAR
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UEN News
http://www.uen.org

August 23:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00003463.htm

September 7:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 8:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

September 19:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

October 17:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPEXE

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