Education News Roundup: August 23, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Ogden High School
Creative Commons/Mark Hufstetler

Canyons School District will place a bond issue on the ballot in November.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEC (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aEX (KTVX)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aF1 (DN via KSL)

Ogden schools collect a check for Ogden High’s role in the web series “Youth and Consequences.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEN (OSE)

KUTV looks at crowding at Fremont High.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEW (KUTV)

Ed Week looks at how states and schools across the country are filling those hard-to-fill teaching positions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFg (Ed Week)

Ed Week also looks at how schools are handling the boom in student-to-student sexting.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEK (Ed Week)

Massachusetts becomes the first state to have a majority of its labor force hold bachelor’s degrees or better.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aF6 (AP)
or a copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/aF7 (MassBudget)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Canyons District to ask voters to bond for $283 million to build schools

Ogden schools get $67,500 payment for filming crew’s use of Ogden High

Crowded Fremont High asks for more room on November ballot

Why parents of private-school kids aren’t put off by rising tuition
Data suggest no effect on enrollments

Students return to district schools as Nebo School District opens new Advanced Learning Center

Latino students find success in science at UVU

4 tools to help prep your student for college

Utah STEM Bus heads out to schools, Utah Solutions Summit Thursday, Silicon Slopes Fall Lecture Series

Salt Lake Chamber, Silicon Slopes join forces
Move to strengthen voice of business, tech on Capitol Hill

Kaysville parents upset over discontinued school bus service

Rep. Chris Stewart donates school supplies Utah Refugee Services Office

‘The moon made the sun smile’ – Utah kids amazed by solar eclipse on first day of school
Students across the Salt Lake Valley fill their first day of the 2017-2018 with one-in-a-lifetime watch parties, eclipse lessons and fun activities.

Boy stable after hit and run near Utah elementary school

Northern Utah drivers asked to be more alert as students return to school

Plain City teen performs CPR after his father collapses on a high school track

Mesquite council to reconsider fund to aid local education

Everyday Learners: Back to school, back to reading

25 beautiful photos of the first day of school

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Keep the federal government out of school choice

NATION

Districts Turn to Emergency Measures for Hard-to-Staff Teaching Posts
Some use emergency measures to fill spots

DQC Urges States to Use Data to Improve Teacher Prep

LGBT Rights Group Sues Trump Admin. for Records on Transgender Policy Shift

Evolution of Sexting Tests School Leaders, Students

Judge: Racism behind Arizona ban on Mexican-American studies

Spanish-speaking teachers getting special training to meet California’s demand for more bilingual teachers

Amazon Unveils New Writing Curriculum for Grades 4-6

Oklahoma City Public Schools to sue state Legislature

Report: Half of state’s labor force holds bachelor’s degrees

Earn-and-learn training programs offer students pathways to debt-free education

Berlin school installs anti-prostitute fence
A construction boom is pushing sex workers into the sidestreets and onto the doorsteps of schools. One school is fed up with its premises being invaded by unscrupulous characters.

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Canyons District to ask voters to bond for $283 million to build schools

SANDY – Hillcrest High School and Brighton High School would be rebuilt along with Union Middle School and four elementary schools under a $283 million bond proposal approved Tuesday by the Canyons Board of Education.
The Canyons School Board voted 6-1 to adopt a resolution to place the general obligation bond issue on the Nov. 7 ballot.
According to school district documents, estimated cost for the new high schools would be $85 million to $87 million each.
The proposed bond would fund reconstruction of West Draper, White City, Midvalley and Peruvian Park elementary schools at a projected cost of $20 million each.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEC (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aEX (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aF1 (DN via KSL)

 

Ogden schools get $67,500 payment for filming crew’s use of Ogden High

OGDEN – The Ogden School District will receive $67,500 for letting a production company film at one of the district’s high schools.
The first season of a web series called “Youth and Consequences” is being filmed both in and around Ogden High School through September.
District spokesman Jer Bates said the the payment will be split, with $37,500 going to the district and the rest going directly to the high school.
Bates said the payment split is specific to this contract.
The district’s portion will go into the capital budget, which means it will go back into facilities. The school’s portion is put into discretionary funds, so the school can use it for whatever they deem the most important or needed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEN (OSE)

 

Crowded Fremont High asks for more room on November ballot

The Weber School District opened its doors Tuesday morning to thousands of students.
2News visited Fremont High School where officials are begging for more classrooms, despite being the biggest school in the district.
The high school used to sit in the middle of a corn field, but as new construction comes in, students are being pushed out.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEW (KUTV)

 

Why parents of private-school kids aren’t put off by rising tuition
Data suggest no effect on enrollments

Few things generate as much angst for parents as how to pay for college. But dealing with the high cost of education is nothing new if your kids spent their K-12 years in a private school.
The average private-school tuition in the U.S. is now just shy of $10,000 a year — more than the average sticker price for a public university. Since 1988, annual increases have ranged from 2.6 percent to more than 4 percent, outpacing inflation.
And there is no sign the trend will be reversed. In fact, while colleges raise tuition almost reluctantly, fearing a customer backlash, private schools are encouraged to embrace a price hike.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFf (KTVX)

 

Students return to district schools as Nebo School District opens new Advanced Learning Center

Students at Geneva Elementary School in Orem didn’t just enter the school’s doors to see a red carpet made out of construction paper for their first day of school on Tuesday. They had the red paper carpet, and a fog machine to pump fog out as they walked through it, and a banner, and teachers wearing lab coats to greet them.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEP (PDH)

 

Latino students find success in science at UVU

Two dozen underserved high school students are on their way to becoming scientists, thanks to a Utah Valley University program called Latino Scientists of Tomorrow. This year, most of the students are from Utah County.
At no charge, this summer they attended classes at UVU four hours a day, five days a week, for seven weeks. In addition, they took field trips to round out their learning experiences. While still in high school, they earned college credit for two classes. Those are introduction to biotechnology and fitness for life, both of which count as elective credits, no matter what major they pursue. The fitness class focuses on the science of exercise.
The program encourages future participation in science, technology, engineering and math, also known as STEM.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aER (PDH)

 

4 tools to help prep your student for college

Max Gonzales from the Utah Education Network (UEN) shared four ways you can best help your student prep for college. He explained it is never to early for your student to start thinking about college and they can start to gather information for their resume as early as 8th grade.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFi (KTVX)

Utah STEM Bus heads out to schools, Utah Solutions Summit Thursday, Silicon Slopes Fall Lecture Series

Gov. Gary R. Herbert and STEM industry leaders unveiled the Utah STEM Bus at a ribbon-cutting ceremony last week at the State Capitol.
The bus was made possible by a $1.5 million grant to the Utah STEM Action Center from Andeavor (formerly Tesoro), to transform a donated Utah Transit Authority Bus into a mobile STEM classroom.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFj (PDH)

 

Salt Lake Chamber, Silicon Slopes join forces
Move to strengthen voice of business, tech on Capitol Hill

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – An important partnership becomes official between the Salt Lake Chamber and the Silicon Slopes.
The chamber has been serving Utah’s business community for 130 years. Now they’re working with the growing tech industry.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aF0 (KTVX)

 

Kaysville parents upset over discontinued school bus service

Parents are outraged after Davis County School District pulled bus service to students who live within a mile and a half of Kay’s Creek Elementary School.
Under Utah state law, school bus routes within one and a half miles of the school property are not funded unless they are determined to be hazardous or a hardship.
The new school opened in a developing area of West Kaysville, Utah, last year. Parents convinced the district to provide bus routes to all students while the city worked to improve safety last school year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEU (KUTV)

 

Rep. Chris Stewart donates school supplies Utah Refugee Services Office

SOUTH SALT LAKE – In a country where notebooks, pens and pencils only cost a few dollars, refugee families in Utah still struggle to provide their kids with school supplies, Asha Parekh said.
As director of the state Refugee Services Office, Parekh knows that many refugee families come from refugee camps and places where children may not have had opportunities to attend school.
“It’s only the stuff, but that makes a big difference when you have pencils and papers that are as shiny and new as your neighbor’s,” she said.
The office of Rep. Chris Stewart, R-Utah, on Tuesday donated school supplies to the Refugee Services Office. Community members traveled across the state to deliver the supplies to his office, Stewart said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aED (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aFh (KTVX)

 

‘The moon made the sun smile’ – Utah kids amazed by solar eclipse on first day of school
Students across the Salt Lake Valley fill their first day of the 2017-2018 with one-in-a-lifetime watch parties, eclipse lessons and fun activities.

As Lisa DeFrance escorted her fourth-graders out to the Meadowlark Elementary School fields Monday morning to watch the Great American Solar Eclipse, many of her students asked what time it was.
It was just before 11 a.m. but it felt like much later in the day, with dusklike shadows, dimmed sunlight and cooler temperatures settling over the public elementary school on Salt Lake City’s west side.
And as other classrooms joined them, the students talked excitedly about the astronomical changes as they gazed up through protective glasses to watch the eclipse advance, all with a wonder that DeFrance described as “fantastic.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEL (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aFe (San Juan Record)

 

Boy stable after hit and run near Utah elementary school

An 11-year-old boy is in stable condition after a hit-and-run incident near Calvin Smith Elementary in Taylorsville, Elementary.
Unified Police Department are looking for a 2000 silver Ford truck, described as an extended or crew cab F150.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEV (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aEY (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aF3 (KSTU)

 

Northern Utah drivers asked to be more alert as students return to school

The children of Northern Utah are packing their school supplies into backpacks and heading off into the adventure of another year at school.
But that means many of those students will be in school parking lots, sidewalks and crosswalks.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEM (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aEO (PDH)

 

Plain City teen performs CPR after his father collapses on a high school track

PLAIN CITY, Weber County – A Plain City teen is being credited with saving his father’s life after the man collapsed while exercising on the Fremont High School track earlier this month.
Jeff Boothe, 40, said he almost set out to do sprints by himself, but at the last minute asked his 17-year-old son Colby to video him running down the track so that he could check his form. That is what he believes really made the difference. Seconds after Coby stopped recording is when Jeff Boothe collapsed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aF2 (KSL)

 

Mesquite council to reconsider fund to aid local education

The Mesquite City Council on Tuesday night will revisit the introduction of an ordinance that would create a separate city fund using tax money from recreational cannabis sales to supplement education needs in the Virgin Valley.
Petitioned by Councilman Brian Wursten, the city will introduce Bill No. 526 as Ordinance No. 526 and set public hearing for the Sept. 12 city council meeting.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aET (SGS)

 

Everyday Learners: Back to school, back to reading

The days are starting to get a little bit shorter, and the nights are becoming a little crisper. You know what that means – it’s about time to go back to school.
It also means that this is an excellent time to look forward to the school year, and make some goals for the coming months about encouraging your children to read more.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEQ (PDH)

 

25 beautiful photos of the first day of school

Daily Herald photographers capture life every day in Utah County. Each week we feature 25 of their best photos on a particular subject.
As August comes around each year, children’s hearts are filled with dread, and their parent’s hearts are filled with excitement as they anticipate a new school year. With fresh backpacks and empty binders, students make their way to a new class and teacher, eager to learn. Even university students have a little bit of eager anticipation for the new year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aES (PDH)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Keep the federal government out of school choice
Washington Post op-ed by Lindsey Burke, Heritage Foundation’s Center for Education Policy director, Neal McCluskey, Cato Institute’s Center for Educational Freedom director, and Vicki Alger, author of “Failure: The Federal ‘Misedukation’ of America’s Children”

School choice has many benefits. It frees people to select the type of education that will best serve their families. It makes educators accountable to the people they are supposed to work for. And study after study proves it typically leads to improved academic outcomes. But despite these advantages, that does not mean the federal government should push choice in a nationwide program. The dangers may be too great.
The Trump administration has made clear that it wants to support school choice. In his February address to Congress, the president called education “the civil rights issue of our time,” and he has pledged to direct $20 billion to advance choice. He also picked school choice stalwart Betsy DeVos as his education secretary.
Trump deserves credit for seeing the need to weaken a government monopoly, let parents choose the best education for their unique children and leave educators free to teach as they see fit. But there is great risk in federalizing choice: He who pays the piper calls the tune, and federal control could ultimately impose the same regulations on once-independent schools that have stifled public institutions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEH

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Districts Turn to Emergency Measures for Hard-to-Staff Teaching Posts
Some use emergency measures to fill spots
Education Week

Across the country, school districts are trying new tactics to avoid starting this school year with an empty teacher’s desk, with some going so far as to hire parents to staff empty classrooms.
Many districts have reported trouble filling certain positions, particularly in traditional shortage areas like special education, math, science, and foreign-language instruction. That is, of course, a perennial issue: Most states have reported shortage areas for years, if not decades.
For the 2017-18 school year, every state reported geographic and/or subject-area shortage areas to the U.S. Department of Education.
While that doesn’t necessarily indicate a national teacher shortfall, the shortages remain intense in certain places. In Oklahoma, for example, the state-which has the lowest average teacher pay in the country-issued a record-setting 1,160 emergency certifications in 2016-17 and 855 by the beginning of August for this academic year. These certifications allow people without a teaching certificate to teach for one year, or allow a certified teacher to teach a new subject before getting recertified.
And in Nevada, the fast-growing Clark County district, which includes Las Vegas and is the fifth-largest in the country, is starting its school year with almost 400 teaching vacancies-significant, though a far cry from the more than 900 openings the district had at the start of 2015-16.
Near Tucson, Ariz., the Vail school system has struggled with hiring enough qualified teachers for the past several years. Previously, the district started the year with substitute teachers filling the gaps. That lack of consistency wasn’t ideal for parents, students, and the instructional team, Superintendent Calvin Baker said.
In May, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey, a Republican, signed a law that allows districts to hire people without formal teacher training-similar to recent changes in Oklahoma and Utah. Prospective teachers just need five years of experience working in a field relevant to the subject area they will teach or a bachelor’s degree (or both).
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFg

 

DQC Urges States to Use Data to Improve Teacher Prep
THE Journal

While states have all kinds of requirements laying out how teachers should be prepared for the classroom, they don’t often give back information on how those teachers do in the classroom that could lead to improvements in their educator preparation programs.
A new brief from the Data Quality Campaign encourages state education leaders and regulators to evaluate what data they can collect from training programs that will help those programs get better. Likewise, it urges them to reach out to teachers themselves to learn more about what works and doesn’t work for professional development. DQC is a nonprofit that focuses on topics related to the use of data for educational purposes.
According to “Using Data to Ensure That Teachers Are Learner Ready on Day One,” the data needed to develop policies and practices for improving teacher quality is unavailable to those who need it because states, educator preparation programs and school administrators tend to collect and use their data in silos. As a result, information such as teacher performance data isn’t shared back to preparation programs that could use it to improve their training efforts.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEF

A copy of the brief
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEG (Data Quality Campaign)

 

LGBT Rights Group Sues Trump Admin. for Records on Transgender Policy Shift
Education Week

A prominent LGBT legal group has sued the U.S. Departments of Education and Justice for records related to the agencies’ decision to withdraw federal guidance on the rights of transgender students in public schools.
Lambda Legal filed its Freedom of Information Act lawsuit Tuesday, seeking all records and correspondence related to the policy shift and its implementation. The federal agencies have not yet provided those documents after the organization made a formal open records request in March, the suit says.
The Trevor Project and National Center for Transgender Equality have also filed open records requests about the guidance and civil rights enforcement for transgender students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aF9

 

Evolution of Sexting Tests School Leaders, Students
Education Week

Philadelphia — For Jane Griffin, the principal at Louisiana’s Winnfield High, the moment came when one of her students found a staff member’s smartphone lying on a desk, picked it up, and took a picture of his own genitals.
For Shafta Collazo, an assistant principal at Delaware’s Woodbridge Middle School, it came when a student got mad at his girlfriend and decided to “airdrop” compromising digital photos of her to dozens of other children using a file-transfer service for Mac devices.
And for Assistant Principal Deirdra Chandler, the realization that responding to youth “sexting” is now a part of the job, even for leaders of K-5 schools, came after one of her young students at South Carolina’s Erwin Elementary School sent out sexual imagery of another student to his friends.
“It’s scary,” said Chandler, one of nearly 100 concerned school leaders who packed into a conference room here last month, during the annual conference of the nation’s principals, to discuss the dangers of sexting.
This fraught new reality for U.S. schools is regularly in the headlines, and principals at the conference said they’re overwhelmed by the developmental, legal, and technological aspects of a phenomenon that’s moving faster than their ability to keep up.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEK

 

Judge: Racism behind Arizona ban on Mexican-American studies
Associated Press

PHOENIX – Racism was behind an Arizona ban on ethnic studies that shuttered a popular Mexican-American Studies program, a federal judge said Tuesday.
U.S. District Judge A. Wallace Tashima found that the state enacted the ban with discriminatory intent.
He had previously upheld most of the law in a civil lawsuit filed by students in the Tucson Unified School District. But a federal appeals court, while upholding most of his ruling, sent the case back to trial to determine if the ban was enacted with racist intent.
The new trial was held in July.
The law prohibits courses that promote resentment toward a race or a class of people or advocate ethnic solidarity instead of treating people as individuals. A portion of the law that banned courses designed primarily for students of a particular ethnic group was struck down.
The state violated students’ constitutional rights “because both enactment and enforcement were motivated by racial animus,” Tashima said in the ruling Tuesday.
However, Tashima said he doesn’t know a remedy for the violation and has not issued a final judgment. Plaintiffs’ attorneys hoped he would throw out the law, which was enacted in 2010, the same year Arizona approved its landmark immigration law known as SB1070. They have not responded to calls for comment Tuesday evening.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEI

http://gousoe.uen.org/aEJ ([Phoenix] Arizona Republic)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aF4 (NPR)

 

Spanish-speaking teachers getting special training to meet California’s demand for more bilingual teachers
(Oakland, CA) EdSource

Native Spanish speakers who have been teaching in English-only classrooms are the focus of specialized training in many districts across California to meet the increased demand for bilingual teachers.
“We have a lot of teachers who at one point were bilingual who are now teachers of English-only classes,” said Maria Maldonado, Fresno Unified’s assistant superintendent for English learner services. “Our bilingual teachers need a lot of support. Many are native speakers of Spanish, so their Spanish is quite causal. We want high-level academic language.”
Fresno and many other districts throughout the state are adding back bilingual programs as a result of the passage last November of Prop. 58, which ended a mandate for mostly English-only classes for students who come to school speaking other languages.
That mandate dates to 1998 when voters approved Prop. 227, the state’s “English in Public Schools” initiative. That’s when Fresno shut down most of its more than 20 bilingual programs.
Now, Fresno and other districts are looking to add to their bilingual teaching staffs, but they are hard-pressed to find teachers who not only can teach in formal, academic Spanish, but are also up-to-speed on the state’s more rigorous Common Core standards in math and English language arts, along with standards for teaching English learners and new Next Generation Science Standards.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aEE

 

Amazon Unveils New Writing Curriculum for Grades 4-6
Education Week

What’s retail giant Amazon doing in education?
More and more, it turns out, with the company’s launch today of TenMarks Writing, an online writing curriculum that it has developed over the past year for teachers to help students become better writers.
The new product takes its name from TenMarks, an ed-tech company with a digital math resource that Amazon acquired as a startup in 2013, and that is now in 85 percent of school districts, according to the company’s website.
“TenMarks Writing comes from talking to teachers all over the country,” said Meera Vaidyanathan, director of curriculum products for Amazon Education, in an interview. Educators are looking for ways to reach students “who are either not interested in, or daunted by” writing, she said.
TenMarks Writing, which is available for students in grades 4 to 6, relies on established instructional techniques like scaffolding to help students learn the process of writing stories and compositions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFa

http://gousoe.uen.org/aFb (Fast Company)

Oklahoma City Public Schools to sue state Legislature
Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY – Oklahoma City Public Schools officials are planning to sue the state Legislature for educational funding.
The Oklahoma City Public Schools board unanimously approved a resolution Monday to pursue legal action against the Legislature. It comes after school funding cuts followed budget shortfalls.
The resolution accuses lawmakers of ignoring “their constitutional responsibility” to provide textbooks for every child by eliminating funding for instructional materials. It also says cuts in funding for “requirements established by the Legislature” left underfunded liabilities for Oklahoma City Public Schools.
“All of those things we have to pull funding from that would normally go into the classroom that we now divert to these mandates that the Legislature has placed on us,” said Mark Mann, a board member who authored the resolution.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aF8

 

Report: Half of state’s labor force holds bachelor’s degrees
Associated Press

BOSTON – Half of all workers in Massachusetts held a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2016, marking the first time any U.S. state has reached that educational threshold, according to a report released Wednesday by the independent Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.
The same analysis points to a growing wage chasm in the state, with the college-educated earning on average 99 percent – or nearly double – the wages of those in the labor force with only a high school education. That difference, often referred to as the “college wage premium,” was 56.6 percent across the entire nation in 2016.
MassBudget, a liberal-leaning economic and fiscal research group, cited data compiled by the Economic Policy Institute from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey.
In Massachusetts, 50.2 percent of individuals participating in the state’s labor force had attained at minimum a four-year degree from a college or university in 2016. The next highest states were New Jersey (45.2 percent), New York (43.7 percent), Maryland (43 percent) and Connecticut (42.7 percent), according to the CPS data. The U.S. average was 35.5 percent in 2016.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aF6

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/aF7 (MassBudget)

 

Earn-and-learn training programs offer students pathways to debt-free education
Detroit Metro Times

We live in a post-vocational education world. The problem? That same world still needs skilled trades workers. In fact, in a 2015 report on employment and occupations in skilled trades released by the state of Michigan, researchers estimate that by 2022 skilled trades jobs will grow by almost 14 percent – about 6,600 jobs – a number well above the 8.7 percent growth rate expected for jobs in the state overall.
According to reports, the gap between the number of skilled trades workers and jobs will continue to grow as baby boomers – who hold the majority of skilled trades jobs in both Michigan and the country – retire. And the rate at which workers are graduating from the very limited vocational education programs available simply cannot support the ever-growing need.
How did we get here?
In the 1950s, vocational education had long been a staple in high school curriculums, but a new system began to separate students into two tracks: One was bound for college, the other would enter into a skilled trade. It sounded like a good idea; college isn’t for everyone and neither is, say, electrical work. But parents and teachers soon realized the system was nothing more than a social caste that put wealthy, white kids on track for college and poor, minority students into trades.
Rather than create a fair system, schools simply did away with the vocational track and students began taking shop classes as elective courses rather than a concerted path of study. Things worsened during the 2008 economic downturn, when expensive shops became more and more difficult to financially sustain, and many shuttered.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFc

 

Berlin school installs anti-prostitute fence
A construction boom is pushing sex workers into the sidestreets and onto the doorsteps of schools. One school is fed up with its premises being invaded by unscrupulous characters.
(Bonn, Germany) Deutsche Welle

A Berlin school finished building a 1.8-meter (5-feet-11-inch) fence to keep street prostitutes out of its campus, local media reported on Tuesday.
The Französisches Gymnasium highschool lies on a sidestreet of the German capital’s notorious Kurfürstenstraße. The street is a relatively major thoroughfare through Berlin’s inner west, but is also the center of the city’s street prostitution scene.
Prostitutes can be seen soliciting clients at all hours of the day there.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aF5

 

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CALENDAR
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UEN News
http://www.uen.org

August 23:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00003463.htm

August 25:

Income Tax Working Group meeting
2 p.m., 250 Senate Building
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=SPEWGI

September 7:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 8:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

September 19:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

October 17:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPEXE

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