Education News Roundup: Aug. 24, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

The U’s Utah Education Policy Center will survey Utah teachers to find out why they’re leaving the profession.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFt (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aFX (DN via KSL)

Gov. Herbert announces a new IT education pathway.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFr (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aFs (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aFz (PDH)

Appeal hearing for Kairos Academy pushed back to Sept. 5.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aG2 (SLT)

What effect do schools’ start dates have on local economies?
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFS (Atlantic)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

U.’s Education Policy Center to survey state’s teachers on why they stay, why they leave

Tech jobs are everywhere in Utah. State leaders want to get you the training to fill one.

Hearing delayed on whether to revive charter for teen moms
Kairos Academy in West Valley City now faces Sept. 5 appeal hearing before Utah Board of Education, after citing a perceived conflict of interest for first hearing officer.

Feeding Students: Davis School District Nutrition Services

Utah ranked 50th in US gender equality, including last in education, health

Relative says former Utahn may have killed his wife, girlfriend and girlfriend’s daughter at Idaho farmhouse because the women discovered he was cheating on them

Plain City teen performs CPR after his father collapses on a high school track

Northern Utah educators welcome kids with fun, fanfare on first day of school

Law Enforcement increasing patrols as school starts

Rep. Chris Stewart donates school supplies to Utah Refugee Services Office

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Legislature continues softening Utah’s laws

More football programs need to follow Provo’s lead

When drivers don’t pay attention, kids die in school crosswalks

Utah may be trading a dinosaur wonder for a coal mine

Taking federal handouts for ‘granted’; should St. George be beholden?

What school time means for your kids this year (and every year)

An invitation to join school council

There Trump goes again bashing public schools – and why it matters

Test Scores Don’t Lie: Charter Schools Are Transformative
Our black and Hispanic students in Central Harlem outperform the city’s white pupils by double digits.

NATION

How Academic Calendars Shape the Economy
Some states’ decisions to start school before Labor Day raise questions about the impact of a shorter summer break on tourism.

Abstinence-Only Education Is Ineffective And Unethical, Report Argues

Can an ‘Open’ Math Curriculum Compete With Commercial Publishers?

Lawsuit filed over delay of Arizona’s school choice program

US court rejects appeal from praying football coach

Videos show East High cheerleaders repeatedly forced into splits, police investigating

Parents, students challenge Joshua ISD over grooming code

Kids who skip breakfast may miss key nutrients

U.S. retailers hit as immigration worries weigh on Hispanic spending

Once Banned, Lotteries are Big Money for US States

Common and Hanks among stars of ‘Super School Live’ special

 

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UTAH NEWS
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U.’s Education Policy Center to survey state’s teachers on why they stay, why they leave

SALT LAKE CITY – An education research center at the University of Utah will survey past and current public schoolteachers statewide this fall to develop a comprehensive understanding of why Utah teachers leave the profession, and conversely, why they stay.
Andrea Rorrer, director of the U.’s Utah Education Policy Center, said initial survey results should be available by January and will include statewide and district-level data.
“We’re moving from the rhetoric of teachers are staying or leaving to better understanding empirically why they are staying or leaving,” said Rorrer, addressing the state Legislature’s Education Interim Committee on Wednesday.
The data is intended to help policymakers develop “scalable solutions that are both efficient and effective,” she said.
Researchers will be asking teachers about factors that influenced their decisions to stay or leave, and whether they were voluntary or involuntary.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFt (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aFX (DN via KSL)

 

Tech jobs are everywhere in Utah. State leaders want to get you the training to fill one.

Lehi * As human resources director at the software company Domo, Cathy Donahoe understands the needs, opportunities and challenges that must be addressed by the state’s new IT Pathways Program.
Companies of all sizes need employees throughout their ranks who are computer savvy, she said at Wednesday’s unveiling of the initiative, an event that attracted the governor, university presidents and tech-company executives. The program, which is still being designed, will help high school students and adults gain coding experience and other skills they need for tech careers.
“IT systems run all businesses. Who doesn’t use technology to do their jobs. … It’s everywhere in our world,” Donahoe said. So an IT program shouldn’t just focus on top-of-the-line technical positions; it should also make it possible for people to get training for jobs that require different levels of expertise, she said.
“We need writers, people across all disciplines,” she said, echoing other speakers who argued for the creation of “stackable credentials.”
That’s the buzzword that applies to the idea of crafting one- and two-year training and education programs that allow workers to elevate their skills and compete for better jobs without acquiring a traditional four-year academic degree.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFr (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aFs (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aFz (PDH)

 

Hearing delayed on whether to revive charter for teen moms
Kairos Academy in West Valley City now faces Sept. 5 appeal hearing before Utah Board of Education, after citing a perceived conflict of interest for first hearing officer.

The future of Kairos Academy, a West Valley charter school for young mothers and pregnant teens, will come down to two meetings in the first week of September.
After being forced to shut down by the State Charter School Board in July, Kairos administrators appealed the decision to the Utah Board of Education, which initially scheduled a hearing for August 29.
But the hearing has now been postponed until Sep. 5, board of education spokeswoman Emilie Wheeler said Thursday, narrowing the window between when the schools leaders make their case for continued operation and when state school board members are expected to ultimately vote on Kairos’ fate at their regular monthly meeting on Sep. 8.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aG2 (SLT)

 

Feeding Students: Davis School District Nutrition Services

If the smell doesn’t draw you inside, the taste of their homemade muffins will.
“You always get that cinnamon smell in here,” said Todd Blanscett, during an exclusive tour of the Davis School District Nutrition Services building.
Watching it, it’ll remind you of the iconic chocolate factory scene from the popular 1950’s sitcom ‘I Love Lucy’.
“They are putting them on as fast as they can,” said Balnscett, the Nutrition Services Coordinator. “We can make the machine go faster or slower just depending on what the product is.”
The building is located on the west-side of the Freeport Center in Clearfield, Utah. Just one building and 20 employees is how it’s always been.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aG3 (KUTV)

 

Utah ranked 50th in US gender equality, including last in education, health

Salt Lake City – When it comes to women’s equality, Utah ranks dead last in the United States — that according to a new study.
That ranking is from WalletHub, that measured all 50 U.S. states in three categories: 1. Equal treatment in workplace environment, 2. Education and health, 3. Political empowerment.
The Beehive State did the worst in the education and health category, placing last, but Utah wasn’t much better in the other categories either. It ranked 40th in political empowerment, its highest of the three categories and 43rd in workplace environment.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFC (KUTV)

The ranking
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFD (WalletHub)

Relative says former Utahn may have killed his wife, girlfriend and girlfriend’s daughter at Idaho farmhouse because the women discovered he was cheating on them

Did former Utahn Gerald Michael Bullinger kill his wife, as well his girlfriend and her teenage daughter, at an Idaho farmhouse this summer because the women discovered he was cheating on them?
That’s what the relative of one of the three victims believes may have prompted the shootings.
The bodies of Bullinger’s wife, 57-year-old Cheryl Baker, his girlfriend, 48-year-old Nadja Medley, and Medley’s 14-year-old daughter, Payton Medley, were found beneath a tarp in a shed behind the house in Caldwell, Idaho, on June 19.
Police have since launched a nationwide hunt for Bullinger, 60, who is charged with three counts of first-degree felony murder, according to Canyon County police, as well as a felony count of failing to report a death.

A retired school teacher, Cheryl Baker was good with crafts and quilts, Byron Baker said. She had planned to create an art studio at the Idaho house, according to, Byron Baker, who said she was quiet, spiritual and environmentally active.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFv (SLT)

 

Plain City teen performs CPR after his father collapses on a high school track

PLAIN CITY, Weber County – A Plain City teen is being credited with saving his father’s life after the man collapsed while exercising on the Fremont High School track earlier this month.
Jeff Boothe, 40, said he almost set out to do sprints by himself, but at the last minute asked his 17-year-old son Colby to video him running down the track so that he could check his form. That is what he believes really made the difference. Seconds after Coby stopped recording is when Jeff Boothe collapsed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFw (DN)

 

Northern Utah educators welcome kids with fun, fanfare on first day of school

KAYSVILLE – Snow Horse Elementary School couldn’t start the school year without – of course — horses.
Students sat eagerly outside the morning of Wednesday, Aug. 23, and watched as head custodian Rusty Smith and Principal Rachel Alberts rode the American flag in on horseback.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFx (OSE)

 

Law Enforcement increasing patrols as school starts

LOGAN – With summer coming to an end and kids going back to school, law enforcement is ramping up their patrols of school zones and crosswalks. Officers will be increasing their presence around schools, not only educating motorists but interacting with students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFB (CVD)

 

Rep. Chris Stewart donates school supplies to Utah Refugee Services Office

SOUTH SALT LAKE – In a country where notebooks, pens and pencils only cost a few dollars, refugee families in Utah still struggle to provide their kids with school supplies, Asha Parekh said.
As director of the state Refugee Services Office, Parekh knows that many refugee families come from refugee camps and places where children may not have had opportunities to attend school.
“It’s only the stuff, but that makes a big difference when you have pencils and papers that are as shiny and new as your neighbor’s,” she said.
The office of Rep. Chris Stewart, R-Utah, on Tuesday donated school supplies to the Refugee Services Office. Community members traveled across the state to deliver the supplies to his office, Stewart said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFE (KSL)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Legislature continues softening Utah’s laws
Richfield Reaper editorial

The Utah chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union issued a statement last week praising new laws the state Legislature adopted during its 2017 session.
The ACLU indicated that the changes are positive.
However, upon closer inspection, these changes in the law are the philosophical equivalent of shrugging one’s shoulders and giving up.
The new laws take certain offenses that occur in schools out of the jurisdiction of law enforcement – specifically most class C misdemeanors – such as disorderly conduct and possession of tobacco. Truancy is also exclusively in the jurisdiction of school administrators.
So even though these students are breaking the law, school administrators are hampered in their ability to utilize intervention from youth resource officers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFZ

 

More football programs need to follow Provo’s lead
(Provo) Daily Herald editorial

Football is a dangerous game.
That is no longer a subjective opinion, if it ever was. It is a scientific fact that receives new, compelling evidence every time two teams collide on the gridiron.
So, in this era when National Football League officials and talking heads on various sports networks are talking about player safety – but not yet actually doing much about it – it is encouraging to see the efforts being made at a more grassroots level to help.
For those who may have missed it, the Daily Herald published an important story in its Sunday print edition (and still available online at heraldextra.com) about the Provo High School football team using new helmet technology this season to study how violent collisions, especially those that lead to concussions, are impacting players.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFA

 

When drivers don’t pay attention, kids die in school crosswalks
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

School’s starting. Slow down. Look for kids in crosswalks.
It’s the same message you hear every fall.
But it bears repeating, especially this year. Because young lives are at risk, as we learned again in April.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFy

 

Utah may be trading a dinosaur wonder for a coal mine
Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Heidi McIntosh, managing attorney and public lands expert at Earthjustice

A funny thing happened in rural southern Utah after President Clinton designated the 1.7 million-acre Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in 1996. Utah politicians howled, in chorus with coal, oil and gas interests, that the monument would spell economic doom for the region. But not so, as it turns out.
Instead, the communities in this rugged landscape thrived. They’ve grown sustainable economies and rejected the boom-and-bust fossil fuel industries that have long pillaged the West’s fragile landscapes.
Between 2001 and 2015, the population in the two counties bordering Grand Staircase grew by 13 percent, jobs increased 24 percent and real personal income grew 32 percent. In other words, the monument has been a hit for jobs and the economy. Travel and tourism boomed in the region, offering 1,630 jobs around Grand Staircase; new business has bloomed in the desert, and property values have grown.
In the big picture, recreation from adventure-seekers, hikers, amateur geologists and families simply getting outdoors now funnels more than $12 billion into Utah’s economy.
Why are people flocking to see Grand Staircase-Escalante? One big draw is the trove of spectacular dinosaur fossils that are found nowhere else on Earth.

After President Clinton designated the monument, Congress passed legislation modifying its boundaries 1998. Congress then approved a land swap in which the state of Utah received 145,000 acres of mineral-rich federal lands and $50 million from the federal treasury.
A lot of folks have forgotten about that deal. But it’s hard to imagine the people of Utah agreeing to reimburse the federal treasury for the $50 million, never mind relinquishing control of the 145,000 acres they’ve assumed as a state asset. That $50 million has since gone to support Utah’s public schools. No one should ignore the enormous benefit to the state of Utah from this deal – or that reversing the monument now would constitute an historic rip-off by the state.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFW

 

Taking federal handouts for ‘granted’; should St. George be beholden?
St. George News commentary by columnist Howard Sierer


Welcome to the wacky world of federal government grants that will hand out a planned total of $703 billion in 2018 to state and local governments and tens of billions more dollars to individuals.
A grant is a government cash gift with lots of strings attached. Virtually every federal department and many federal agencies offer grant money in over 900 different grant programs.
Taxpayers can rest assured that every grant is made “to fund your ideas and projects to provide public service and stimulate the economy.” Provided of course, your ideas match Washington, D.C.’s latest hot button or you represent a state or local government that has managed to get Congress to tailor grants to match its needs.
Why is our federal government doing these things? Why is it supposed to respond to every special interest like those above using your tax dollars?

Washington County gets $14.7 million of its $47 million budget from the federal government. The Washington County School District gets $21 million of its $251 million annual budget from the federal government and a whopping $115 million more from the state.

I prefer local tax and spending decisions like school bonds, the RAP tax, and the recently defeated transportation tax
http://gousoe.uen.org/aG0

 

What school time means for your kids this year (and every year)
KSL commentary by Intermountain Live Well

Pencils and binders are not the only things students need as they prepare to return to school. Children entering kindergarten or seventh grade are required by Utah law to receive standard immunizations before classes begin again.
This requirement is not meant to only protect the child getting the vaccination, but also to protect others in schools and our communities by helping eliminate childhood diseases that used to cost hundreds of lives. For example, Utah has one of the highest rates of pertussis, or whooping cough, in the country-and this dangerous disease could be avoided through keeping current on immunizations.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFV

 

An invitation to join school council
Moab Sun News op-ed by Stephen Hren, Principal, Grand County High School

Dear Community Members,
The purpose of this correspondence is to invite you to become a member of the Grand County High School Community Council and inform you of the nature of this organization.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFY

There Trump goes again bashing public schools – and why it matters
Washington Post commentary by columnist Valerie Strauss

He can’t seem to help himself.
Just about anytime President Trump talks about or does something in regard to public schools, it is in a disparaging manner.

Let’s jump to this month, where on Tuesday, in Phoenix, he did it again. During a diatribe against the media, he said:
“Not only does the media give a platform to hate groups, but the media turns a blind eye to the gang violence on our streets, the failures of our public schools, the destruction of our wealth at the hands of the terrible, terrible trade deals made by politicians that should’ve never been allowed to be politicians.”
In fact, the U.S. media often reports on problems with the public education system, with regular news stories, investigations and analyses. But the larger effect of Trump’s remark is not that it is wrong but rather that it is part of a pattern of his – and of DeVos’s – to disparage public education as they promote programs that take resources away from public school systems.
DeVos called public education a “dead end” before becoming education secretary and has continued to talk about it in less-than-flattering terms, refusing to acknowledge the value of what has been America’s most important civic institution.
Such sentiments by Trump and DeVos, consistently expressed publicly, reinforce the myth that traditional public education is broadly failing students and that the answer is using public money for privately run and/or owned schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFT

 

Test Scores Don’t Lie: Charter Schools Are Transformative
Our black and Hispanic students in Central Harlem outperform the city’s white pupils by double digits.
Wall Street Journal op-ed by Eva Moskowitz, founder and CEO of Success Academy Charter Schools

I grew up in Harlem in the 1960s and early ’70s. My brother and I attended a failing school where we were the only white students. My parents, both professors, supplemented our education at home, but we understood that our classmates were wholly dependent on the inadequate education the school offered. Even at that young age I perceived this as a terrible injustice.
Thirty years later, when I was again living in Harlem and ready to send my own son to school, those same schools were still abysmally low-performing. In 2006, when I opened my first charter school in Harlem, the district schools were still failing.
Today, there is a different story to tell about Harlem, and it is thanks to a school-choice movement that has given rise to dozens of high-performing charter schools. Today, almost half of the students in Central Harlem attend a charter school; in East Harlem, a quarter do.
The results of the 2017 New York state tests were released Tuesday, and my staff has been busy crunching the numbers. They demonstrate how transformative this development has been for Harlem residents. In Central Harlem, for example, the number of students meeting rigorous, Common Core math standards has more than doubled since 2013-from 1,690 to 3,703. Students attending charter schools account for 96% of that growth. Results for English language arts are similarly inspiring.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFu

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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How Academic Calendars Shape the Economy
Some states’ decisions to start school before Labor Day raise questions about the impact of a shorter summer break on tourism.
Atlantic

For Tracy Horodyski, a teacher in the Kenowa Hills school district in Michigan, a new district schedule has her returning to the classroom on Monday, August 28-her first pre-Labor Day start in more than a decade. But rather than wishing for a longer vacation, the change comes as something of a relief.
After more than two months away, Horodyski, an elementary reading and literacy specialist and Michigan’s 2016-17 Teacher of the Year, said she’s eager to get back to school. The students she’s talked to, including her two young sons, say they’re looking forward to seeing friends, meeting their new teachers, and getting back into a more regular routine.
“And their parents are definitely ready by now for them to go back,” she said with a laugh.
In some states, the question of school calendars is being considered through an economic lens-not just with an eye toward their developing students’ potential as future members of the workforce but on the impact a shorter summer break might have on local tourism. Among them is Michigan, which since the 2006-07 academic year has prohibited most districts from starting prior to Labor Day, a move intended in part to protect the state’s many resort communities that depend heavily on summer visitors. This year, Horodyski’s employer joins more than 100 other districts and charter schools that have received a waiver from Michigan’s requirement, after demonstrating that an earlier start to the academic year is necessary to meet other academic mandates.
Some districts preferred to add the extra time earlier in the year, compared with tacking it on in late June, when student enthusiasm and attention spans have often begun to flag. The state’s annual assessments are given toward the end of the year, and “when testing cycle ends in May and students still have three weeks left, some may feel the school year is over after the test,” said Superintendent Michael Zoerhoff of the Kentwood school district, where the new academic year began August 22, to the Grand Rapids Press.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFS

Abstinence-Only Education Is Ineffective And Unethical, Report Argues
NPR

Abstaining from sexual activity is a surefire way to prevent pregnancy and avoid sexually transmitted diseases. But programs advocating abstinence often fail to prevent young people from having sex, researchers write in the September issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health.
Such programs, sometimes referred to as “abstinence only until marriage” programs, typically advocate monogamous, heterosexual marriage as the only appropriate context for sexual intercourse and as the only certain way to avoid unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases.
That’s “not just unrealistic, but it leaves our young people without the information and skills that they need,” said Laura Lindberg, a coauthor of the report and a research scientist at the Guttmacher Institute, a reproductive health research group that supports abortion rights. “We fail our young people when we don’t provide them with complete and medically accurate information.”
The analysis confirms previous public health findings that abstinence-only education programs don’t succeed in reducing rates of teen pregnancies or STDs. Moreover, public health data indicate that such programs “have little demonstrated efficacy in helping adolescents to delay intercourse,” the authors write.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFF

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFG (Journal of Adolescent Health)

 

Can an ‘Open’ Math Curriculum Compete With Commercial Publishers?
Education Week

A major middle-school math curriculum aligned to the Common Core State Standards today goes live for all to download, use, and adapt for free, in what will serve as a major test case as to whether open curriculum resources can truly compete with traditional textbook publishers.
The release of Illustrative Mathematics 6-8 Math, published by the nonprofit Open Up Resources, represents the confluence of three trends that have had a huge impact on curriculum development in recent years: Open educational resources, or OER; the common core; and concerns about curricular coherence-how it aligns across grades.
The curriculum has been released under a Creative Commons license and can be used even for commercial purposes, as long as it is properly attributed to the author and publisher. Illustrative Mathematics, the nonprofit partner that crafted the curriculum for Open Up Resources, is led by William McCallum, one of the primary mathematics writers of the Common Core State Standards.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFN

 

Lawsuit filed over delay of Arizona’s school choice program
Associated Press

PHOENIX – A lawsuit has been filed over an attempt to delay the expansion of Arizona’s school choice program.
The Goldwater Institute conservative think tank was part of a coalition that filed the lawsuit Wednesday, saying the attempted delay has put many families’ educational futures in limbo.
Earlier this month, an anti-school choice group filed petition signatures to halt the program’s expansion.
Opponents of the state’s sweeping new school voucher law want to block it until voters can weigh in next year.
The measure is temporarily on hold until the signature certification process concludes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFL

 

US court rejects appeal from praying football coach
Associated Press

SEATTLE – A Washington state high school football coach took advantage of his position when he prayed on the field after games, and he’s not entitled to immediately get his job back, a federal appeals court said Wednesday.
The three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. District Court of Appeals unanimously held that Bremerton High coach Joe Kennedy’s prayers did not constitute protected free speech because he was acting as a public employee, not a private citizen, when he conducted them.
“By kneeling and praying on the fifty-yard line immediately after games while in view of students and parents, Kennedy was sending a message about what he values as a coach, what the District considers appropriate behavior, and what students should believe, or how they ought to behave,” Judge Milan Smith wrote for the court.
The judge added that Kennedy “took advantage of his position to press his particular views upon the impressionable and captive minds before him.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFO

http://gousoe.uen.org/aFQ (Seattle Times)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aFR (Ed Week)

A copy of the ruling
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFP (Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals)

Videos show East High cheerleaders repeatedly forced into splits, police investigating
(Denver) KUSA

DENVER – Editor’s note: the video included in this story is difficult to watch and may not be suitable for all viewers.
Denver Police are now investigating incidents involving multiple cheerleaders and the cheer coach at East High School, 9Wants to Know has learned. The cheer coach, assistant cheer coach, high school principal, assistant principal and Denver Public Schools deputy general counsel have all been placed on leave.
During the first week of cheer camp for East High School in June, Ally Wakefield, an incoming freshman was surrounded by new teammates, and forced, by the recently hired cheer coach, into an extended split position.
In videos obtained by 9Wants to Know, eight cheerleaders are shown repeatedly being pushed down into the forced splits, while their arms are held up by fellow teammates, making each cheerleader unable to move herself out of the position.
All cry out in pain. Ally Wakefield asked her coach, 9 times in less than 24 seconds to “please, stop.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFM

 

Parents, students challenge Joshua ISD over grooming code
(Dallas) WFFA

The stress of school can go beyond what’s taught in a classroom. For Habib Dwabi, look no further than the top of his head.
The Joshua Independent School District has had a long-standing grooming code for boys’ hair. Earlier this year, Faye Abunijmeh was notified that her son was in violation of that grooming code.
“He’s been growing it since Pre-K, for five years,” said Faye Abunijmeh, Habib’s mother.
Five years is a long time when you consider Habib is only nine years old. Faye told WFAA that they decided some time ago to grow the hair and later donate it to cancer patients.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFH

 

Kids who skip breakfast may miss key nutrients
Reuters

Children who skip breakfast on a regular basis are likely to fall short for the day in getting all their recommended essential nutrients, a UK study suggests.
Kids who skipped breakfast every day were less likely to get enough iron, calcium, iodine and folate when compared to kids who ate breakfast every day, the research team found.
“A greater proportion of those children who ate breakfast met their recommended intakes of these micronutrients compared to breakfast skippers,” coauthors Gerda Pot and Janine Coulthard of Kings College London told Reuters Health in an email interview.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFI

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFJ (British Journal of Nutrition)

 

U.S. retailers hit as immigration worries weigh on Hispanic spending
Reuters

CHICAGO – Many U.S. Hispanics are venturing out only to buy essential goods and are cutting back on discretionary spending, worried about possible harassment by immigration or law enforcement officials since the election of U.S. President Donald Trump, according to community groups, research firms and retailers.
This change in consumer behavior by the country’s second-fastest-growing ethnic group has recently been cited as a cause for worry by already-struggling consumer companies, from big-box retailers to auto parts makers.

On average, Hispanics are younger than non-Hispanics, have more children, and spend more on each child, according to Jeff Humphreys, director of economic forecasting at the Terry College of Business. Humphreys also said Hispanics tend to spend more on apparel, making their buying choices crucial to many retailers.
As the slowdown has mainly hit discretionary spending, retailers that deal in apparel and footwear – two sectors already feeling pressure – are hurting the most.
NPD said makers of athletic wear popular with Hispanics, including Nike Inc (NKE.N), Skechers USA Inc (SKX.N) and Vans (VFC.N), would take a big hit.
“It’s certainly a good litmus test of how the holiday season is going to shake out,” NPD analyst Marshal Cohen said, pointing to a double-digit decline in back-to-school footwear sales, compared with a double-digit increase last year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFK

Once Banned, Lotteries are Big Money for US States
Voice of America

A lottery player in the U.S. state of Massachusetts won the $759 million Powerball jackpot Wednesday night, the second highest in the game’s history and an amount that prompted millions of Americans to buy tickets in hopes they would have the lucky numbers.
The odds of winning the top prize were 1-in-292 million. Last year, three winners split the record $1.6 billion Powerball jackpot. Early Thursday, Charlie McIntyre, Powerball Product Group chairman, said the $758.7 million jackpot is the largest grand prize won by a single lottery ticket in U.S. history.
And yet, legalized lotteries are a relatively new phenomenon in the United States.
Early colonists operated lotteries, and Roger Dunstan, who wrote the book History of Gambling in the United States, said the Jamestown colonists operated lotteries to fund the colony.
But the Massachusetts Bay Colony, founded by Puritans, banned lotteries and other forms of gambling, even at home.
In the end, the lure of easy money was too much and eventually, each of the 13 original colonies operated lotteries to provide funding.
Money from lotteries was used to fund schools and infrastructure, which is similar to what the revenues are used for today.

Now, nearly every state, with the exception of Alaska, Hawaii, Mississippi, Nevada, Utah and Alabama, has a state lottery.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aG1

 

Common and Hanks among stars of ‘Super School Live’ special
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES – Tom Hanks, Samuel L. Jackson, Common and Jennifer Hudson are among the celebrities participating in an hour-long live television special about reinventing American high schools.
The stars will be joined by more than two dozen celebrities slated to appear on the “EIF Presents: XQ Super School Live ” special that will air on all four major broadcast networks simultaneously on Sept. 8 at 8 p.m. Eastern.
The special will highlight the efforts of the XQ Institute, which was co-founded by a former assistant education secretary in President Barack Obama’s administration.
It’s slated to include live music, comedy sketches and documentary segments.
Hudson, Sheryl Crow and Yo-Yo Ma are among the scheduled musical performers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aFU

 

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CALENDAR
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UEN News
http://www.uen.org

August 25:

Income Tax Working Group meeting
2 p.m., 250 Senate Building
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=SPEWGI

September 7:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 8:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 13:

Education Interim Committee meeting
10 a.m., 1575 S State Street, SLC
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

September 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

September 19:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

September 20:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

October 17:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

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