Education News Roundup: Aug. 28, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

D-News looks at Utah’s draft ESSA plan.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGE (DN)

Trib looks at results of lead testing in drinking water in Utah public schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGK (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aH1 (AP)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aHe (AP via OSE)

AP looks at controversy in ed tech.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGH (AP)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Utah plan ‘not mindless compliance’ to federal education act, state superintendent says

Early testing reveals more than 200 Utah schools have lead in their drinking water – some at potentially dangerous levels

School Police May Once Again Get Military Equipment Under Trump Policy Reversal

USU Extension 4-H program takes the lead with Google partnership

Utah schools short on bus drivers as classes start

UDOT replaces pedestrian bridge with school buses during Bangerter construction

Beloved Hillcrest football coach Cazzie Brown dies after a short illness

School district moving forward after shooting

Girls explore woodworking through Brighton High’s summer workshop

John Knotwell Appointed President and CEO of Utah Technology Council

Back to school breakfast with Harmons

OPINION & COMMENTARY

IT Pathway initiatives to promote a skilled-workforce deserve support

Utah schools – not much has changed since 1968

‘Axes to Taxes’ threatens to chop children

Education reform: Let’s talk about far more than money – tell us how Utah should innovate

Beg to Differ podcast: Don’t count your votes before they ‘Hatch’

$30K for the performing arts at Ogden High? A reader conversation

Promote healthy food choices for students

4 charts on how people around the world see education

Republicans Won’t Let Chicago’s School Crisis Go to Waste
In exchange for bailing out the Windy City, Illinois’s Gov. Rauner wants a serious voucher program.

It’s time to stop the growing fear of ICE in American schools

NATION

Learning software in classrooms earns praise, causes debate

Houston Schools Closed All Week in Aftermath of Hurricane Harvey

New Federal Rule Could Force States to Lower Graduation Rates
Under ESSA, some states face prospect of having to lower graduation numbers

U.S. Schools Receive Aid From Qatar
A foundation based in the energy-rich nation is looking to ramp up spending on Arabic language instruction in public K-12 schools around the nation

1,300 Catholic Educators to Trump: Preserve DACA
The move comes as the president faces a Sept. 5 deadline to end the program or face a challenge from Republican state lawmakers in federal court.

Who Is the Average U.S. Teacher?

What Should We Be Teaching Young Children?

Seattle traffic engineers paint streets for school safety

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Utah plan ‘not mindless compliance’ to federal education act, state superintendent says

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah’s plan for the Every Student Succeeds Act is “not mindless compliance” to federal mandates, according to the state superintendent of public instruction.
On Sept. 8, the Utah State Board of Education is expected to act on the plan, which is essentially an application for $123 million in federal funds for programs that assist children experiencing homelessness, live in poverty or whose parents are migrant farmworkers, among other initiatives. The federal funding also supports professional development for teachers.
Utah’s 127-page draft, more than a year in the making, also includes the state’s latest public school accountability program spelled out in SB220, passed by the Utah Legislature earlier this year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGE (DN)

 

Early testing reveals more than 200 Utah schools have lead in their drinking water – some at potentially dangerous levels

At least some level of lead has turned up in the drinking water at nearly 90 percent of the 249 Utah schools that have been tested – with the worst results more than five times higher than key federal limits, according to state data.
The drinking water in nine schools, six of which are in the Granite School District, was found to contain levels of lead that exceed the Environmental Protection Agency’s “action level” of 15 micrograms per liter.
Most of the drinking-water systems tested contain only low levels of the toxic metal, which is nonetheless known to cause developmental delays in young children. But just 25 of those 249 schools have entirely lead-free drinking water.
Parents should be aware of lead-tainted water at their child’s school, but not panic, said a top Utah health expert.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGK (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aH1 (AP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aHe (AP via OSE)

 

School Police May Once Again Get Military Equipment Under Trump Policy Reversal

President Donald Trump rescinded Obama-era restrictions on local police agencies’ ability to acquire surplus equipment from the Department of Defense Monday, a change that clears the way for school police to once again obtain military equipment like grenade launchers and mine-resistant armored vehicles through the program, known as 1033.
School district police agencies in at least 22 states used 1033 to acquire such equipment before the rules went into effect, public records show.
Those rules prohibited the transfer of tracked armored vehicles, bayonets, grenade launchers, large-caliber weapons, and ammunition to local law-enforcement agencies. While they allowed qualifying local agencies to acquire certain other equipment from the Pentagon, they prohibited such aquisitions by police departments that exclusively serve K-12 schools.
President Barack Obama implemented the restrictions in 2015 at the recommendation of an interagency task force after concerns that St. Louis-area police agencies equipped with military gear were too heavy handed in their response to protesters in Ferguson, Mo. Trump rescinded those restrictions in an executive order Monday that was originally announced by Attorney General Jeff Sessions in a speech to the Fraternal Order of Police.
“Those restrictions went too far,” Sessions said. “We will not put superficial concerns above public safety.”
Sessions did not mention public schools in his address.
Public records requests show that, before the rules went into place, school police agencies around the country had used the 1033 program to obtain equipment like powerful rifles and armored vehicles, which raised concerns from civil rights groups who’ve long questioned the role of law enforcement in schools, Education Week reported in 2014:
“A database from the Defense Department shows that tactical gear and weapons from the 1033 program have been provided to school police departments in at least 22 districts in eight states-California, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Michigan, Nevada, Texas, and Utah.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHa (Ed Week)

 

USU Extension 4-H program takes the lead with Google partnership

Google and the National 4-H Council are partnering on a new computer science and computational thinking initiative, with Utah State University Extension 4-H leading the way for the rest of the country.
USU Extension faculty members co-created the curriculum and resources for a computer science career pathway, which will roll out to the rest of the 4-H programs across the country. The new program will teach 4-H members technical skills like coding as well as teamwork, resilience and problem solving.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGQ (CVD)

 

Utah schools short on bus drivers as classes start

SARATOGA SPRINGS – It’s the first week of school for many students in Utah, and some area districts are facing bus driver shortages to start the new academic year.
Students at Vista Heights Middle School, part of Alpine School District in Saratoga Springs, have had to wait up to 20 minutes for buses, according to parents.
In Kaysville, several bus routes have been eliminated, forcing kids to walk along busy roads to get to school, one parent said.
Schools in Saratoga Springs have been affected by a districtwide bus driver shortage, Alpine School District Administrator of Public Relations David Stephenson said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aH9 (KSL)

 

UDOT replaces pedestrian bridge with school buses during Bangerter construction

WEST JORDAN – Hundreds of elementary students can no longer walk or bike to school now that a pedestrian bridge has been removed as part of ongoing construction on Bangerter Highway.
So UDOT has opted to bring out the buses.
The Utah Department of Transportation established a temporary bus service at Oquirrh Elementary, 7165 S. 3285 West, to provide safe transportation to and from school for kids who live west of the highway.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGN (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aGX (DN via KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aGZ (KSTU)

 

Beloved Hillcrest football coach Cazzie Brown dies after a short illness

After four days in the hospital, Hillcrest High School football coach Cazzie Brown passed away Sunday night.
According to a family spokesperson, Brown was brought to the emergency room Wednesday for complications with his thyroid. The doctors found that he had contracted bacterial meningitis, and later he tested positive for West Nile virus.
Due to a loss of blood flow to his brain, Brown was put on life support Thursday. He was taken off life support around 8:30 p.m. Sunday night, and he passed peacefully around 9:20 p.m..
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGJ (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aGM (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aGS (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aGT (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aGW (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aGY (KSTU)

 

School district moving forward after shooting

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – Last year students at Union Middle school were rattled when the unexpected happened. A student came to school with a gun and shot another student. As students head back to school, parents may wonder if their kids are safe. To talk about concerns parents may have for their kids, Union Middle School assistant principal, Taylor Hansen joined Good Morning Utah with Hailey Higgins.
He said he was one of the first administrators on scene that day. “In a matter of minutes so many lives were changed forever,” Hansen explained. “I’m so glad that we had spent time preparing and training to respond to emergencies so that we could attended to the physical and emotional needs of students and teachers.
Hansen says the District has the schools continuously drilling for all kinds of emergencies. “I think that really help us be prepared. That’s really the key: being prepared.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGV (KTVX)

 

Girls explore woodworking through Brighton High’s summer workshop

More girls may be enrolling in Brighton High’s woodworking and engineering design courses this fall, thanks to a summer workshop targeting middle school and high school girls to get hands-on experience.
This is the third summer Brighton has offered the free one-day class, encouraging girls to learn non-traditional skills, said Paul Otterstrom, who taught the workshop two days this summer. Boys also take the workshop.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHd (Cottonwood-Holladay Journal)

 

John Knotwell Appointed President and CEO of Utah Technology Council

SALT LAKE CITY–Utah Technology Council (UTC), the premier tech association for Utah, today announces that the Board of Trustees has unanimously appointed John Knotwell as President and CEO. Knotwell succeeds Richard R. Nelson, who will serve as advisor to the Board of Directors.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHc (Business Wire)

 

Back to school breakfast with Harmons

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah — It’s time to head back to school, and Chef Casey from Harmons joined Good Morning Utah with Hailey Higgins for the perfect homemade poptart.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGU (KTVX)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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IT Pathway initiatives to promote a skilled-workforce deserve support
Deseret News editorial

Governor Gary Herbert’s new IT “Pathways Program” is a step in the right direction but Utah must continue to champion the kind of educational training that will grow the state’s tech industry in the long run.
Utah companies justifiably lament the lack of locally-based STEM-trained workers needed to fuel the burgeoning tech sector. Industry and education should look for more opportunities to come together to form innovative public private partnerships and build Utah’s skilled workforce for the 21st century.
According to a recent study, the skills necessary to succeed in available jobs are harder for employers to find.
Some point out that Utah’s education system simply doesn’t have enough computer science classes. When high schools do offer Advance Placement computer science courses, students aren’t signing up.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGF

 

Utah schools – not much has changed since 1968
Deseret News op-ed by M. Donald Thomas, a former Salt Lake City superintendent of schools

In 1968, as a first-year superintendent of schools, I wrote an article for the Chicago Tribune Magazine. The article received widespread interest and produced several job offers. What I said in 1968 is not much different from what should be said in 2017. Not much has changed:

  1. Public education has been and continues to be underfunded.
  2. Public schools have been and continue to be overburdened.
  3. Public schools have and continue to discriminate against poor and minority children.
  4. Teachers have not and continue not to be appreciated for the demanding work that they do.

Let’s examine these four statements.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGD

 

‘Axes to Taxes’ threatens to chop children
Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Matthew Weinstein, state priorities partnership director for Voices for Utah Children

The national “Axes to Taxes Tour” arrived in Utah Saturday with a luncheon event in Midvale featuring Sen. Mike Lee. Many of the goals and ideals of the tour and its sponsors are laudable – broaden the tax base, lower tax rates, simplify the tax code. But the tour has one goal that raises significant concerns for its potential impact on Utah’s children (and all of us): the goal of cutting public budgets so as to finance tax cuts.
While no one loves paying taxes, and while it’s easy to skewer “big government” in the abstract, multibillion dollar public budget cuts can harm millions of real people – and the nation as a whole – in specific and substantial ways.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGL

 

Education reform: Let’s talk about far more than money – tell us how Utah should innovate
Sutherland Institute commentary by education policy analyst Christine Cooke

Speech given by Christine Cooke, education policy director at Sutherland Institute, to Utah legislators on interim day, Aug. 24, 2017.
Utah has an important opportunity right now – it’s the opportunity to guide the focus of our current education reform debate from money to students. This important moment is precipitated by a national discussion about the status quo and a statewide call for more funding through an income and sales tax hike. It’s our response to this moment that will set the stage for how we approach education for our children in the future.
The big question: What will Utah do to reform education? Will it be more money through a tax hike, or will it be more than that?
Sutherland’s message today can be boiled down to this request: Let us make sure that any education reform debate – language and policy – is focused on the student, not simply money. And when we do discuss money, let it be coupled with very intentional questions, like: How will this be spent to maximize the learning of the individual student? How are we innovating to make sure that funds are spent in a way that reaches the one?
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGR

Beg to Differ podcast: Don’t count your votes before they ‘Hatch’
Utah Policy commentary by columnist Bryan Schott

Bryan Schott and Mike Winder make you the smartest person in the room when you discuss politics.

We talk with Rich McKeown of Count My Vote about the likelihood that they’ll re-launch their ballot initiative next year to eliminate the caucus/convention system for getting on the ballot.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGC (audio)

 

$30K for the performing arts at Ogden High? A reader conversation
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner commentary

The Ogden School District just made a cool $67,500.
How?
By allowing a production company to film a web series at Ogden High School.
Filming of “Youth and Consequences” continues through September, Anna Burleson reported for the Standard-Examiner.
According to the contract, the district receives $37,500, with Ogden High pocketing the remaining $30,0000.
While the district’s share goes into its capital budget, the school can spend the money however it wants, said the district’s spokesman, Jer Bates.
Principal Luke Rasmussen is interested in using the cash to enhance the school’s performing arts programs, Bates said.
“It’s discretionary meaning we trust our administrators to do what’s best with the funds, to provide what’s most needed for our students, but there still is some oversight,” Bates told Burleson.
If the series is a success, film crews will return to Ogden High next summer, Bates said – after negotiating a new fee with the district.
Here’s how readers reacted to the story when we shared it on Facebook.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGO

 

Promote healthy food choices for students
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Landon Hines

With the new school year upon us, parents turn their attention to school clothes, school supplies, and school food. Yes, school food!
More than 31 million children rely on school meals for their daily nutrition, which too often consists of highly processed food laden with saturated fat. Not surprisingly, one-third of our children have become overweight or obese. Their early dietary flaws become lifelong addictions, raising their risk of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGP

 

4 charts on how people around the world see education
Pew Research Center commentary by LAURA SILVERLEAVE, senior researcher focusing on global research

Publics around the world disagree about which is more important to emphasize in school: creative thinking or basic academic skills and discipline. Here are four key findings about educational preferences from a 2016 Pew Research Center survey of 19 countries.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aH5

 

Republicans Won’t Let Chicago’s School Crisis Go to Waste
In exchange for bailing out the Windy City, Illinois’s Gov. Rauner wants a serious voucher program.
Wall Street Journal commentary by columnist Allysia Finley

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel once observed shrewdly that a crisis is an “opportunity to do things you think you could not do before.” His words ring especially true in Illinois, which is about to enact one of the largest private-school scholarship programs in the country. The breakthrough has been made possible by a fiscal crisis in the nation’s third-largest school district.
Chicago Public Schools expects to run a $544 million deficit in the coming fiscal year and is at risk of defaulting on debt payments. Legislative leaders in Springfield have been working around the clock on a new school-funding formula that would bail out CPS. In return for his signature, Gov. Bruce Rauner, a Republican, has demanded a tax-credit scholarship program for poor kids to attend private schools. Seventeen states have similar programs, which provide tax credits for contributions to nonprofit scholarship funds.
In 2010 a voucher program passed the state Senate but died in the House primarily due to opposition from Chicago Democrats. But now the city’s Democrats, including House Speaker Michael Madigan, are more receptive. That’s because a straight-up bailout of Chicago schools would invariably reduce funding for downstate districts. It simply doesn’t have enough support in the state House to pass.
Schools across the state, including those in Chicago, may not open on time if lawmakers don’t pass a new funding formula next week. Democrats could blame the debacle on Mr. Rauner, but shutting down schools statewide to force a bailout of Chicago schools isn’t popular anywhere-not even in Chicago. And CPS desperately needs state cash to maintain access to credit markets due to its history of financial mismanagement.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGB $

 

It’s time to stop the growing fear of ICE in American schools
(Washington, DC) The Hill op-ed by KATHERINE CULLITON-GONZÁLEZ, senior counsel at Demos

While families across the country are sending their children back to school, immigrant families are under particular stress thanks to President Trump, who just pardoned Joe Arpaio, a former Arizona sheriff who openly racially profiled Latinos in “immigration patrols.”
As our kids go back to their classes, we urgently need assurances that the constitutional rights of immigrant families will be protected in the educational environment, in every school district across the nation.
Arpaio was convicted on contempt of court charges after a federal judge ordered the sheriff to stop detaining people suspected of being in the country illegally. Excusing racial profiling with this pardon is only the latest in Trump’s attacks on immigrant families. Since Trump’s election, Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrests have increased 40 percent and ICE Chief Thomas Homan has said that all undocumented immigrants “should be afraid.”
Nationally, over 400 persons are arrested by ICE every day, tearing apart families with little due process and creating devastating circumstances, including fear that the family member being deported will face human rights violations.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aH8

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Learning software in classrooms earns praise, causes debate
Associated Press

WASHINGTON – In middle school, Junior Alvarado often struggled with multiplication and earned poor grades in math, so when he started his freshman year at Washington Leadership Academy, a charter high school in the nation’s capital, he fretted that he would lag behind.
But his teachers used technology to identify his weak spots, customize a learning plan just for him and coach him through it. This past week, as Alvarado started sophomore geometry, he was more confident in his skills.
“For me personalized learning is having classes set at your level,” Alvarado, 15, said in between lessons. “They explain the problem step by step, it wouldn’t be as fast, it will be at your pace.”
As schools struggle to raise high school graduation rates and close the persistent achievement gap for minority and low-income students, many educators tout digital technology in the classroom as a way forward. But experts caution that this approach still needs more scrutiny and warn schools and parents against being overly reliant on computers.
The use of technology in schools is part of a broader concept of personalized learning that has been gaining popularity in recent years. It’s a pedagogical philosophy centered on the interests and needs of each individual child as opposed to universal standards. Other features include flexible learning environments, customized education paths and letting students have a say in what and how they want to learn.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGH

 

Houston Schools Closed All Week in Aftermath of Hurricane Harvey
Education Week

Catastrophic flooding and heavy rains have led Houston, the nation’s sixth-largest school district, and several other area school districts to announce their closure for the rest of the week.
Officials in the Houston school district announced that its schools will be closed all this week and scheduled to open on Sept. 5, the day after Labor Day, after officials assess the damage from the storm.
Other districts like Alief ISD, which is located in southwest Houston, will be closed Monday and Tuesday.
Cypress-Fairbanks, in northwest Houston, and Fort Bend, in Sugarland, will also close all week, along with Katy ISD and Spring Branch ISD. KIPP Houston will also close all week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aH2

http://gousoe.uen.org/aH6 (USN&WR)

 

New Federal Rule Could Force States to Lower Graduation Rates
Under ESSA, some states face prospect of having to lower graduation numbers
Education Week

A little-noticed change in the country’s main federal education law could force many states to lower their high school graduation rates, a politically explosive move no state would relish.
Indiana is the first state to be caught in the crosshairs of the law’s new language, but other states are likely to be affected soon. The resulting debate could throw a sharp spotlight on a topic that’s been lurking in the wings: the wildly varying levels of accomplishment signified by a high school diploma.
“This is about to become a national issue,” said Phillip Lovell, the policy director of the Alliance for Excellent Education, an advocacy group that focuses on high school issues.
In Indiana, the state faces the prospect of having to lower its graduation rate from 89 percent to 76 percent, a move its state superintendent fears could harm its economy and reputation.
The state’s in a bind because it offers several types of high school diplomas, and some are easier to earn than others. Half of Indiana’s students earn the default college-prep diploma, known as the Core 40. Thirty-eight percent earn the Core 40 with honors, and 12 percent earn the “general” diploma, which has lesser requirements.
Diplomas with less-rigorous requirements are the target of new language in the Every Student Succeeds Act. The law requires states to calculate their graduation rates by including only “standard” diplomas awarded to a “preponderance” of students, or diplomas with tougher requirements.
For Indiana, that means the state might not be able to count its general diplomas.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aH3

 

U.S. Schools Receive Aid From Qatar
A foundation based in the energy-rich nation is looking to ramp up spending on Arabic language instruction in public K-12 schools around the nation
Wall Street Journal

U.S. public schools eager to expand their Arabic language offerings have been receiving funding from a foundation in Qatar, a country embroiled in an intensifying diplomatic standoff over its alleged ties to terrorism.
The Qatar Foundation gave $30.6 million over the past eight years to several dozen schools from New York to Oregon and supporting initiatives to create or encourage the growth of Arabic programs, including paying for teacher training, materials and salaries. The funding came through Qatar Foundation International, the foundation’s U.S. arm.
“We are going to definitely look at ways to expand in the future,” said Omran Hamad Al-Kuwari, executive director of the Qatar Foundation’s CEO office. “We’ve been quite surprised about the interest.”
Benefactors from foreign governments, including other Arab nations, have long made donations to American higher education, but the Qatar Foundation’s appears to be one of the few foreign organizations targeting K-12 public schools with lofty grants. It wants to ramp up spending. Still, the foundation’s donations remain well below those from some major American supporters of K-12 education, such as the Walton Family Foundation, which gave $190.9 million last year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGG $

 

1,300 Catholic Educators to Trump: Preserve DACA
The move comes as the president faces a Sept. 5 deadline to end the program or face a challenge from Republican state lawmakers in federal court.
U.S. News & World Report

More than 1,300 Catholic educators are urging the Trump administration to leave in place the Obama-era policy that protects young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children, known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.
“We stand with our students who are DACA beneficiaries,” they wrote in what they’re calling a “moral mandate” released Monday.
“Their perseverance, hard work and hopefulness is an example to us as teachers,” they wrote. “We witness the obstacles they overcome each day as they pursue their dream of a better life for themselves and their families. In facing adversity and uncertainty with grace and hope, they embody the best of our schools, our country and the Catholic tradition.”
The move comes as the president runs up against a Sept. 5 deadline set by 10 state attorneys general, led by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, for him to end DACA or face a challenge in federal court.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aH7

 

Who Is the Average U.S. Teacher?
Education Week

What does the teaching profession look like? If you guessed mostly white and female, you’d be right-but the whole picture is a lot more nuanced than that. Let EdWeek reporter Liana Loewus explain in just over two minutes.
This data is from the U.S. Department of Education’s survey to a nationally representative sample of 40,000 teachers. This is the first time we’ve gotten new demographic data on the teaching force in four years, but going forward, this survey will be released every two years.
Some highlights:

  • The average teacher is a 42-year-old white woman, with 14 years of experience. She makes $55,000 a year and works 53 hours in an average week.
  • There are some signs that the teaching profession is getting more diverse. The number of Hispanic teachers, for example, has inched forward. (It’s worth noting that studies have shown that increasing teacher diversity significantly is a long way away.)
  • But where are all the male teachers? Gender diversity among the profession has gotten worse in the past four years.
  • Charter school teachers are less experienced and more diverse compared to traditional public school teachers.

http://gousoe.uen.org/aH4

 

What Should We Be Teaching Young Children?
NPR

Early-childhood and elementary school programs reflect a diverse set of commitments about what children ought to learn, and about how they ought to do so.
Some focus on academic preparation and advancement, with extra attention to reading and mathematics. Some emphasize social-emotional development and community values. Others tout their language classes, or their music program, or the opportunities for children to engage in extended projects of their choosing. Some praise structure and discipline; some prize autonomy and play.
Alongside this profusion of options is a rich diet of advice: parenting books, articles, Facebook groups, and friends who swear by one approach or another. For the most part, though, these conversations miss an important question: not just what to learn and how to learn it, but when to do so. In other words, what should young children be learning while young? What’s the argument for learning a particular skill sooner rather than later?
http://gousoe.uen.org/aH0

 

Seattle traffic engineers paint streets for school safety
(Seattle) KING

Seattle traffic engineers have made safety changes ahead of the school year that they want parents, students, and drivers to know about.
Engineers worked all over the city at intersections where there were concerns about helping kids cross safely. They added speed humps, traffic flashers, and crosswalks.
The Seattle Department of Transportation also worked with an artist to use paint to make some areas safer. They painted some of the streets around Ballard High School a crimson color.
It’s a low-cost way to get the attention of drivers and pedestrians. Traffic Engineers say it makes the streets more vibrant and that translates into a safer walk for children headed to classes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aGI

 

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CALENDAR
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UEN News
http://www.uen.org

September 7:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 8:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 13:

Education Interim Committee meeting
10 a.m., 1575 S State Street, SLC
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

September 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
https://www.utahscsb.org/2017

September 19:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

September 20:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

October 17:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPEXE

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