Education News Roundup: Aug. 29, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Utah lawmakers are considering an option that would let them call themselves into special session.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHg (UP)

Logan residents still working out how a community rec center and Logan High can coexist in the same facility.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHo (LHJ)

More Americans are giving better grades to public schools, according to this year’s Phi Delta Kappa poll.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHz (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aHC (WaPo)
or a copy of the poll
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHA (PDK)

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte has launched an on-campus high school for aspiring teachers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHB (Ed Week)

————————————————————
TODAY’S HEADLINES
————————————————————

UTAH

Lawmakers set to wrestle powers away from governor’s office

State lawmaker chosen to head Utah Technology Council advocacy group
Rep. John Knotwell is named the group’s president and CEO.

Demand from school, residents difficult to balance, but Logan rec center hours not 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

First day of Kindergarten bittersweet, even in a brand new school

Skyline High receives Salt Lake County Youth Service’s award

Data: 90 percent of Utah schools testing water find lead

Is tackle football safe?

Hundreds light candles at vigil to honor beloved Hillcrest football coach

Utah’s Wasatch County Schools Launches New Partnership with Discovery Education to Accelerate Digital Conversion Districtwide
Award-Winning Digital Resources Combined with Professional Development to Strengthen District’s Five-Year 1:1 Teaching and Learning Strategy

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Utah women last, again

Tax increase would offer little change, only more confusion

Canadian football team adds intrigue to prep doubleheader at USU

The coming fight in Congress over Hurricane Harvey money, explained

NATION

More Americans Give Top Grades to Public Schools

Education Department Activates Emergency Response Contact Center

The Next Generation of Teacher Prep?

Student’s hijab repeatedly snatched off her head at school; mom wants answers

Forest Hills parents have new app to track school buses

Reading can score students tickets to Carolina-Clemson game

 

————————————————————
UTAH NEWS
————————————————————

Lawmakers set to wrestle powers away from governor’s office

Republican state legislators – with perhaps some Democrats tagging along – will be looking in early 2018 to take power from the executive branch of government.
Specifically, watch for constitutional amendments coming that, among other things, would give the 104 part-time legislators the power to call themselves into a special session, under certain circumstances.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHg (UP)

 

State lawmaker chosen to head Utah Technology Council advocacy group
Rep. John Knotwell is named the group’s president and CEO.

Rep. John Knotwell, R-Herriman, was appointed Monday as president and CEO of the Utah Technology Council, a group that advocates for the high-tech industry.
Knotwell, a member of House Republican leadership as the assistant majority whip, says the new job will not require him to register as a lobbyist – because the group has paid lobbyists who will handle such advocacy with the Legislature.
However, the man he is replacing, outgoing UTC president and CEO Richard R. Nelson, is a registered lobbyist.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHh (SLT)

 

Demand from school, residents difficult to balance, but Logan rec center hours not 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

While balancing the needs of different user groups can be difficult when it comes to the Logan Community Rec Center, the hours the facility is open to the public aren’t quite as bad as some frustrated residents may believe.
A letter to the editor published in The Herald Journal over the weekend claimed the Logan Community Recreation Center is closed to the public from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., but that’s not accurate.
The rec center operates on a joint use agreement between Logan city and Logan High School. Logan Parks and Recreation Director Russ Akina said it can be difficult to both satisfy the general public and make sure students have safe facilities for P.E. classes and afternoon athletics.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHo (LHJ)

 

First day of Kindergarten bittersweet, even in a brand new school

SANDY – The building is brand new, but the emotions experienced by parents and kids as Alta View Elementary School welcomed kindergartners were universal.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHv (KSTU)

 

Skyline High receives Salt Lake County Youth Service’s award

Helping others is the “thing” to do at Skyline High School, with about 150 students enrolled in the Community of Caring service-learning classes this fall.
“It’s a very active program that provides service to a number of groups in our community,” Principal Doug Bingham said. “It’s more than service; it’s also leadership as we have a student leadership board that is the planning board for the program.”
The Community of Caring program regularly holds blood drives for the American Red Cross Utah region, makes sandwiches and serves meals at St. Vincent de Paul dining hall, plans children’s activities for youth at the Road Home overflow shelter and assists at the Utah Food Bank, said Megan Brown, who advised the students last year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHD (Cottonwood-Holladay Journal)

 

Data: 90 percent of Utah schools testing water find lead

SALT LAKE CITY- Tests show nine Utah schools have drinking water with amounts of lead higher than U.S. government guidelines and about 90 percent of schools that have voluntarily tested their water found at least some amount of lead.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHp (AP via CVD)

 

Is tackle football safe?

Professional, college, high school and youth football players have strapped on their pads and laced up their cleats this fall. The health of these players, as well as the risks they take, are again hot topics among fans and team administrators.
“We (parents and coaches) really need to educate ourselves. Football gets a black eye for things, we can do better at helping ourselves recognize dangers and learn to react appropriately. I wonder if the guys that get hurt are wearing a mouthpiece all of the time? Does their helmet fit correctly? This training is something I pride myself on. We have coaches that are aware and watching,” Herriman head coach and acting Utah Football Coaches Association President Dustin Pearce said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHE (Cottonwood-Holladay Journal)

 

Hundreds light candles at vigil to honor beloved Hillcrest football coach

Midvale, Utah – Hundreds packed the Hillcrest High School football field in Midvale, Utah, Monday evening to honor a beloved football coach.
Cazzie Brown, 43, died Sunday evening after complications from West Nile virus, according to a family spokesmahn. He was the football coach at Hillcrest and coached at Highland High School before that.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHq (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aHs (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aHt (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aHu (KSTU)

 

Utah’s Wasatch County Schools Launches New Partnership with Discovery Education to Accelerate Digital Conversion Districtwide
Award-Winning Digital Resources Combined with Professional Development to Strengthen District’s Five-Year 1:1 Teaching and Learning Strategy

Silver Spring, Md. – Utah’s Wasatch County School District (WCSD) today announced the launch of a new partnership with Discovery Education, the leading provider of digital content and professional development for K-12 classrooms. Through this new collaboration, Discovery Education’s dynamic digital content and powerful professional development resources will accelerate WCSD’s districtwide five-year digital conversion.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHG (District Administration)

 

————————————————————
OPINION & COMMENTARY
————————————————————

Utah women last, again
Salt Lake Tribune editorial

Utah women have once again ranked last in a national survey measuring gender equality. Such rankings are probably why Utah has not been the “best managed state” in quite awhile. Being the worst state in the nation for working women is hardly conducive to good management.
The WalletHub study looked at gender representation in leadership roles, salary inequity and unemployment rates. In the “Workplace Environment” ratings, Utah came in at number 43. In the “Political Empowerment” ranking, Utah came in number 40. In the “Education and Health” ranking, Utah came in dead last. And the only reason Utah didn’t rank lower in political representation is likely thanks to the Utah Democrats, who don’t have the aversion to electing women that Utah Republicans do.
We already knew women are underrepresented on city councils and executive positions. We knew that income disparity between men and women from Utah’s colleges was worst in the nation. We also knew women are underrepresented on Utah boards and commissions. Interestingly, Utah women spend approximately 5.55 hours on unpaid care work per day, compared to men who spend 3.22 hours per day. If you don’t think that’s a big deal then try leaving work every day at 2:30 and drive school carpools for the next two hours.
Utah’s ranking as last in education and health categories is also nothing new. The education category measured the disparity between men and women who hold bachelor’s degrees and advanced degrees and disparity between math scores.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHF

 

Tax increase would offer little change, only more confusion
Deseret News op-ed by Michael Melendez, director of policy at Libertas Institute

Another year, another proposal to increase taxes – and this time, it’s a group called Our Schools Now asking Utahns to raise their taxes to the tune of $700 million. The initiative proposal seems simple enough: let’s give more money to teachers and their classrooms. And like a doctor to a child receiving a shot, they say “it’ll only hurt a little bit.”
But if we were to get into the nitty gritty details of the initiative, is this claim true? What does this initiative actually do and how will it affect your family?
First, the initiative seeks to raise $700 million in tax revenue by increasing the income and sales tax rates. These increases may seem harmless, and Our Schools Now describes them as a “.5 percent” and “.45 percent” increase. But the reality is that the effective tax increase will be closer to 15 percent for the average Utah family, relative to what we currently pay.
This leads to the first problem. If you are currently paying income taxes, the poorer you are, the harder you are going to get hit by these tax increases. Only the wealthy will pay the supposed 10 percent income tax increase that Our Schools Now is promoting. Because of deductions, the less you make, the higher that percentage climbs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHi

 

Canadian football team adds intrigue to prep doubleheader at USU
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Kurt Kragthorpe

Studying the Utah high school football schedules, I always look for interstate games. One of the most interesting matchups of 2017 will come Friday, when Desert Hills of St. George, with highly recruited lineman Penei Sewell, visits Mission Hills of California, which features quarterback Jack Tuttle, who’s committed to the University of Utah.
An international game really has my attention, though. A Canadian team is coming to Logan for the second annual Rocky Mountain Kickoff. There will be more glamorous games this season, such as IMG Academy visiting East, but I’m just as curious about this one: Raymond High School of Alberta will meet Cache Valley’s Ridgeline in the second game of Friday’s doubleheader at Maverik Stadium, after Sky View plays Springville.
“It’ll be a really cool experience to get to play a team from outside the country,” said Ridgeline coach Chris Howell. “I’m interested to see what they bring.”
My first question: What are the rules?
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHn

 

The coming fight in Congress over Hurricane Harvey money, explained
Vox commentary by columnist Jeff Stein

Hurricane Harvey isn’t just a major test for the millions of people in and around Houston whose homes are inundated. In the coming weeks, it will also present perhaps the country’s greatest public policy challenge since President Donald Trump’s was inaugurated.
How Congress handles that challenge – and if it completely screws it up – will have enormous consequences for the millions of Texans and Louisianans in the hurricane’s path.
The federal government goes through at least three discrete stages when responding to a natural disaster on the scale of Hurricane Harvey. Right now, we’re still in the first: the immediate search-and-rescue efforts.
“It’s the life-saving mode: Trying to save as many lives as possible,” said Larry Larson, senior policy adviser at the Association of State Floodplain Managers.
The second stage is the short-term recovery, which involves restoring power where possible and moving residents back into homes that are still habitable.
But then, Larson said, there’s the third and longest stage of disaster relief – the one in which federal and local government rebuild the infrastructure crippled by the hurricane, and try to get life as close to normal as possible.

FEMA is far from the only federal agency that will require funding in the wake of the disaster. Among those that will likely seek billions of dollars in emergency temporary funding is the Department of Transportation, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Education, as well as the US military. Schools will have to be repaired; bridges and roads will have to be rebuilt; electrical grids must be restored.
But in the past, getting emergency funding has meant overcoming political hurdles.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHw

 

————————————————————-
NATIONAL NEWS
————————————————————-

More Americans Give Top Grades to Public Schools
Education Week

Americans’ support for public schools has risen in the last year-across the country and across the political spectrum-but the public also wants schools to go beyond academics to provide more career and student health supports, according to the 49th annual education poll by Phi Delta Kappa International.
The percentage of Americans rating K-12 education quality-at both the national and local levels-at an “A” or “B” is the highest it’s been since the 1980s.
That echoes the results of a Gallup opinion poll released last week, which found 47 percent of Americans completely or somewhat “satisfied” with the quality of K-12 education, up 4 percentage points from last year. More Democrats reported being satisfied than Republicans, but conservative participants showed the biggest jump in support, from 32 percent in 2016 to 43 percent this year.
“I do think some of this is a Trump effect,” said Nat Malkus, a resident scholar and deputy director of education policy programs at the free-market-oriented American Enterprise Institute, who was not involved in the survey. President Donald Trump’s and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’ high-profile and unsuccessful push to cut education funding and launch a large-scale private school voucher program may have “engendered a backlash resulting in increasing defense of traditional public schools,” he said. “The national story has definitely been pro-private, so the traditional public school advocates have girded their loins in support, so to speak,” and may have made conservatives more vocally supportive of their public schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHz

http://gousoe.uen.org/aHC (WaPo)

A copy of the poll
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHA (PDK)

 

Education Department Activates Emergency Response Contact Center
U.S. Department of Education

WASHINGTON-The U.S. Department of Education today activated its emergency response contact center in response to the devastating impacts of Hurricane Harvey. The Department’s K-12 and Higher Education stakeholders who are seeking informational resources as well as those seeking relief from Department-based administrative requirements should contact the Department toll free at 1-844-348-4082 or by email at HarveyRelief at ed.gov.
The Department of Education’s primary role in natural disasters is to assist school districts and institutions of higher education in their recovery efforts.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHx

 

The Next Generation of Teacher Prep?
Education Week

The University of North Carolina in Charlotte has launched an on-campus high school for aspiring teachers. The new school, located in the same building as the education school, is the result of a partnership between the university’s Cato College of Education and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school system.
“Ensuring our local school systems consistently have available a well-trained, passionate group of new teachers is an important part of what we do,” said Ellen McIntyre, dean of the Cato College of Education.
The Charlotte Teacher Early College High School opened its doors to 50 9th graders in the second week of August. Students will spend their first two years completing high school requirements, and in the remaining three years tackle general-education college requirements while training to lead classes of their own. By graduation, they will have earned up to 60 college credits that can be transferred to Cato College of Education where they can earn their teaching degrees.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHB

 

Student’s hijab repeatedly snatched off her head at school; mom wants answers
(Atlanta) WXIA

ATLANTA – A metro Atlanta woman says her children are being bullied at school because of their religion.
The mother, who wants to remain anonymous for safety reasons, said that her 15-year-old daughter is a freshman at Stockbridge High School. The mother said that on two different occasions, students have pulled off her daughter’s hijab.
During the first week of school, a student snatched the headscarf off. The mother said her daughter told her there had been a bet where a student said they would pay another student if they did it.
On a school bus last week, students sitting on the bus seat behind her daughter pulled off her headscarf. That led to a fight.
The school’s principal told 11Alive News they have dealt with incidents on a disciplinary level.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHj

 

Forest Hills parents have new app to track school buses
Grand Rapids (MI) Press

GRAND RAPIDS, MI – Forest Hills Public Schools parents can now use the free Versatrans MyStop app to find out exactly where their child’s school bus is on the route and an estimated time of arrival to their bus stop.
The district’s nearly 10,000 students returned to class on Monday, Aug. 28, and Transportation Director Darryl Hofstra said the tracking device was working without any issues.
He said the district has been working on providing the new tool to parents for a couple years.
“Parents have requested to be more connected to transportation information, so they don’t have to call to find out if buses are running late, for example,” Hofstra said.
“The intent of the app is two-fold, to help us operate more efficiently and for parents to have information at their fingertips.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHk

 

Reading can score students tickets to Carolina-Clemson game
Aiken (SC) Standard

The S.C. Department of Education has partnered with the University of South Carolina and Clemson University to present the Read Your Way to the Big Game Contest – a fun, free reading competition for all students in Pre-K through 8th grade.
Student winners will receive tickets and pre-game sideline passes to the Clemson vs. South Carolina football game on Nov. 25 in Columbia, and teachers can receive prizes ranging from $500 to $2,000.
“A child’s ability to read is a critical predictor of educational and lifelong success,” State Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman said. “With the passage of the Read to Succeed Act, the focus and importance of reading has never been higher in South Carolina. This competition is a great way to encourage students to read while celebrating our state’s championship sports tradition.”
All pre-kindergarten through 8th-grade students who read six books by Nov. 10 will qualify to win tickets to the game. Winners also will be recognized on the field during pre-game festivities.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHy

 

————————————————————
CALENDAR
————————————————————

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

September 7:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 8:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 13:

Education Interim Committee meeting
10 a.m., 1575 S State Street, SLC
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

September 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
https://www.utahscsb.org/2017

September 19:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

September 20:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

October 17:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPEXE

Related posts:

Leave a Reply