Education News Roundup: Aug. 30, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Districts begin looking at new flexibility in middle school courses.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHO (DN)
and  (DN via KSL)

Kairos Academy drops its appeal of the State Charter School Board’s decision to terminate its charter.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIp (SLT)

Some middle school students are attending a small satellite conference in Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIq (UPR)

Ed Week looks at the pay of state superintendents.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIi (Ed Week)
and state superintendent salary data
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIj (Ed Week)

Are teachers using memes, emojis, and GIFs to teach a lesson?
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIl (Ed Week)

————————————————————
TODAY’S HEADLINES
————————————————————

UTAH

New state middle school policy boon to local control, board member says

Utah charter school for teen moms abandons fight to reopen
Hearing on Sept. 5 for Kairos Academy in West Valley City canceled after administrators abruptly withdraw appeal.

Students Launching Future Careers Building Small Satellites

Washington County teacher turns classroom into giant camera for students

Jordan High students embrace diversity, support through #DigDiversity project

Three Students Win ‘Mayor for a Day’ Contest

Alta High Marching Band ready for season after Washington, D.C. parade

3 students suffer minor injuries when battery explodes at Taylorsville High

Provo coach pleads not guilty to raping girl in soccer club

Job Corps contractor loses another round in lawsuit after N. Utah teen’s death

Centerville police looking for missing teen last seen Tuesday at Viewmont High

Lead levels too high in 2 Box Elder County schools’ drinking water

Altara Elementary teacher honored with Huntsman Award for Excellence in Education

Lawmaker heading tech council won’t register as lobbyist

Jazz Bear, UDOT encourage kids to walk and bike to school

Police swarm elementary school with a motorcycle, K-9 and high fives for everyone

America First Credit Union supports local youth, donating over 100 backpacks during annual Backpack Bonanza

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Why I support the DREAM Act

Local property taxes are a big problem

Why should teachers have to work for free?

I Teach in Houston. I’m Worried for My Students.

NATION

Harvey delays opening of many Texas schools; some become shelters
Though school districts in the Houston area have postponed classes at least until next Tuesday, their buildings and employees are central to providing relief for people needing shelter during the Hurricane Harvey floods.

Houston Teacher’s Reading Group Comforts Students in Hurricane Aftermath

LDS student body president organizes food, clothing drive for Harvey evacuees

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos tours ‘examples of what schools should aspire to be’
Her Tallahassee appearance drew protesters and enhanced security measures at two local schools.

DeVos to speak at Mackinac GOP conference

State Ed. Chiefs Have New Duties. But Does Their Pay Match Up?
Despite new ESSA-era responsibilities, many earn much less than heads of big local districts

Family of Boy Who Wears Dresses Sues Education Department

Officials grappling with Confederate names on public schools

Native American students can skip conquistador pageantry

Memes, Emojis, and GIFs, Oh My! Teachers Tell How They Use Social Media

Seattle Dads Take Campaign to Eliminate School Lunch Debt Statewide

Ed. Dept.’s Pitch to Scale Back Collection of AP Test Data Raises Eyebrows

 

————————————————————
UTAH NEWS
————————————————————

New state middle school policy boon to local control, board member says

WEST JORDAN – The State School Board’s policy change on middle school curriculum is a boon to local control, a member of the Jordan Board of Education said Tuesday.
Earlier this month, the State School Board voted 9-6 to drop physical education, health, the arts and college and career readiness courses as state core requirements in Utah middle schools.
Backers of the change said the intent of the change was to give local education authorities more control of middle school coursework.
Under the policy change, which will go into effect after a comment period ending Oct. 9, school districts and charter schools can establish their own requirements in addition to the remaining state middle school core requirements: language arts, mathematics, integrated science, U.S. history and Utah history.
Laura Finlinson, the Jordan School District’s administrator of curriculum and staff development, said the policy change “gives every (local education agency) a great deal of flexibility in that if an individual (agency) decides it wants to keep it the way it’s always been, they most certainly can,” she said.
But there other options, such integrating digital literacy into a world history or a language arts class.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHO (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aIa (DN via KSL)

 

Utah charter school for teen moms abandons fight to reopen
Hearing on Sept. 5 for Kairos Academy in West Valley City canceled after administrators abruptly withdraw appeal.

Kairos Academy will remain closed after administrators abandoned their plans to contest the school’s termination.
The Utah Board of Education announced Wednesday that a Sept. 5 hearing for the West Valley City charter school had been cancelled, due to the school withdrawing its appeal of a July closure vote of the State Charter School Board.
“Staff from Kairos Academy, the Utah State Charter School Board, and the Utah State Board of Education are working with nearby school districts and charter schools to find appropriate placement for students who had been attending Kairos,” the Board of Education’s announcement states.
Last year, roughly 90 students attended Kairos Academy, an all-girl charter school geared toward young mothers and pregnant teens. The school opened in 2014, but remained on probationary status from 2015 until its closure due to concerns related to low enrollment and poor academic performance.
State school board spokeswoman Emilie Wheeler said the board was notified of Kairos Academy’s decision to withdraw on Tuesday. The appeal panel was subsequently disbanded, Wheeler said, effectively ending the possibility that Kairos could continue operating.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIp (SLT)

 

Students Launching Future Careers Building Small Satellites

One of the largest Small-Satellite conferences in the world happens in Utah. A group of middle school students from Florida traveled to the west to attend the conference to learn more about building and launching their own data collecting device.
“Being able to see people who have built companies from the ground up. It’s just cool to see how they’ve learned throughout their periods of success and the skills that they have done along the way,” said Evan Vera, a student attending the conference.
Vera and his classmate Stone Wilshire are students at The Weiss School in Palm Beach Florida. They and their classmates entered a NASA competition and were selected to have their 1-U CubeSat flown, for free.
“Well, I really like space,” Wilshire said. “So when I saw that I had the chance to put something in space, I was all for it.”
The students, and other members of the school’s cube-sat. development team are working with instructor Kevin Simmons. He traveled with the 6th through 8th graders to Logan for the Small Satellite Conference.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIq (UPR)

 

Washington County teacher turns classroom into giant camera for students

St. George, Utah – With a few pieces of plastic, tape, scissors, a teacher in southern Utah has turned his classroom into a giant camera.
By doing this the teacher hopes to show the inner workings of how a picture is created just by using the suns light.
Louis Crandall, has been teaching digital photography for nearly 20 years and in this new digital world he wants kids to appreciate the convenience of being able to take a photo with your iPhone.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aI5 (KUTV)

 

Jordan High students embrace diversity, support through #DigDiversity project

With a change of boundaries this fall, Jordan High is expected to have a greater diversity of students, including refugees.
That, according to English and social studies teacher Shannon Callister, helped to build the momentum to make the school welcoming to the new students.
“We wanted to make sure the refugee students knew they had an inviting, safe place at Jordan High,” she said.
The movement began last spring as teachers Suzanne McDougal, Mallory Record, Thomas Sawyer, Alaina Stone, Cozette Baddley, Holly Saunders and Tiffany Parry talked together with Callister. The result was creating the #DigDiversity project to improve school culture.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIt (Sandy Journal)

 

Three Students Win ‘Mayor for a Day’ Contest

What would you do if you were the mayor of Sandy?
That question was given to students in Sandy earlier this year. The response was surprising.
The mayor’s office invited all students in Sandy-area schools to write an essay describing the most important and challenging issues facing the city, and how they would address the topics. A total of 42 students accepted the challenge, and the opportunity to be “Mayor for a Day.” One winning entry was selected from each school category: elementary, middle school and high school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIr (Sandy Journal)

 

Alta High Marching Band ready for season after Washington, D.C. parade

After performing in several area parades as well as marching in Washington, D.C., Alta High Marching Band is ready for its demanding fall schedule of competitions and performances.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIv (Sandy Journal)

 

3 students suffer minor injuries when battery explodes at Taylorsville High

SALT LAKE CITY – A battery in a small electronic device exploded Tuesday morning at Taylorsville High School, leaving some students with minor injuries, school officials said.
Students were in class at 9:45 a.m. when a device began smoking inside a student’s backpack, said Ben Horsley, communications director for Granite School District.
The backpack with the device was sitting on the floor. The battery exploded a few moments later, according to the school district.
The explosion caused the battery to tear through the backpack, Horsley said. Chemicals from the explosion caused minor burns on two students’ arms, and another student inhaled smoke.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHW (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aIb (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aIf (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aI1 (AP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aI2 (AP via OSE)

 

Provo coach pleads not guilty to raping girl in soccer club

A Provo soccer coach has pleaded not guilty to multiple charges of child rape and child sex abuse after a young girl in his soccer club came forward and accused him of sexual abuse.
The defendant, Charles Camara, pleaded not guilty Tuesday to 10 charges: three first-degree felonies of rape of a child, five first-degree felonies of sodomy on a child and two first-degree felonies of aggravated sexual abuse of a child.
Judge Thomas Low also found probable cause to bind Camara, 40, over to trial. Camara has a pretrial conference scheduled for Sept. 18.
Police reports state that in April, a girl reported to police that she had been sexually abused by Camara, a coach at the Walden School of Liberal Arts in Provo.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aI3 (PDH)

 

Job Corps contractor loses another round in lawsuit after N. Utah teen’s death

FARMINGTON – A wrongful death lawsuit against the Clearfield Job Corps Center has landed back in state court after the operating contractor lost a bid to kill the case in federal court.
Isela Huerta Carranza, 17, died March 10, 2014, on the Clearfield vocational training campus. Her mother, Adriana Delaluz of Idaho Falls, Idaho, alleged in a suit filed Feb. 18, 2016, that the Management and Training Corp. staff was negligent in dealing with the teen’s diabetic condition before she suffered seizures and cardiac arrest.
In an Aug. 15 memorandum decision, U.S. District Court Judge Clark Waddoups in Salt Lake City said the Centerville-based company was barred from pursuing its defense in the federal courts because the company already had fought and lost over substantive issues in 2nd District Court.
“While MTC was obviously free to make those strategic decisions in state court, at this stage of the proceedings, MTC must live with the consequences of those decisions,” Waddoups wrote.
MTC’s lawyers transferred the case to federal court and sought the suit’s dismissal there after an adverse ruling Jan. 4 by Judge Thomas Kay in the Farmington court.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHY (OSE)

 

Centerville police looking for missing teen last seen Tuesday at Viewmont High

CENTERVILLE – Local police are searching for a 15-year-old who was last seen at school.
The Centerville Police Department is looking for Viewmont High School student Jaci Brielle Lowry, who has been missing since around lunchtime Tuesday, according to a Facebook post from the CPD.
Jaci was dropped off at the school Tuesday morning, and witnesses said the teen got into someone’s car at lunch and left the school, according to the post.
The post also says that Jaci is diabetic and does not have her medication with her.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHZ (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aI8 (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aI9 (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aId (KSTU)

 

Lead levels too high in 2 Box Elder County schools’ drinking water

In recent tests, two Box Elder School District schools had lead levels in drinking water that were higher than federal guidelines.
Box Elder Director of Facilities Management Jim Christensen said they’re going to re-test one school and a plumbing overhaul is already underway at the other.
While U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidelines say all lead in water is bad, most buildings and homes have some level of lead in their water.
Test results published by the Department of Environmental Quality Division of Drinking Water show in Box Elder, Bear River Middle School and Willard Elementary School had lead concentrations that exceeded the EPA threshold of 15 micrograms per liter.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aI0 (OSE)

 

Altara Elementary teacher honored with Huntsman Award for Excellence in Education

This summer, Altara first-grade teacher Joani Richardson isn’t planning to revamp her curriculum, but instead, relax while playing with her grandchildren – supposedly. She does have plans to update her QR codes she has in place for first-grade students to scan after solving a problem or during a scavenger hunt, and “relaxing” also may mean only racing half-marathons instead of the numerous marathons she’s known to run.
The 42-year veteran teacher, who at 65 says, “I don’t sit still,” was frustrated shortly before the end of the school year when her principal Nicole Svee-Magann said there would be a mandatory surprise assembly.
“I was upset because I had a lot to do,” Richardson recalled. “I had someone come especially to help with a project so I felt really bad that we had to be interrupted for an assembly.”
Richardson said she knew it was something special with she saw Canyons School District Superintendent Jim Briscoe, the school PTA and special guests at the assembly.
“When they said they were there to announce the winner of the Huntsman Award (for Excellence in Education), my mouth just dropped when it included my name in the same sentence,” she said. “I wished my family and husband would have been there – and then, I saw them. I didn’t even see them when I walked in.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIw (Sandy Journal)

 

Lawmaker heading tech council won’t register as lobbyist

SALT LAKE CITY – A Utah state lawmaker named this week as president of a state organization that advocates for the technology industry doesn’t plan to register as a lobbyist, even though the man who had the job before him did.
Rep. John Knotwell was appointed Monday as president and CEO of the Utah Technology Council, a group that advocates for the high-tech industry, the Salt Lake Tribune reported (http://bit.ly/2wdAWgx ).
But Knotwell has no intention of registering as a lobbyist because he said the group has paid lobbyists who will handle such advocacy with the Legislature.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aI6 (AP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aI7 (AP via KUTV)

 

Jazz Bear, UDOT encourage kids to walk and bike to school

BOUNTIFUL, Utah – The Utah Jazz Bear paid a special visit to the Farr family’s home in Bountiful Tuesday – with the goal of helping neighborhood kids develop the healthy habit of walking to school.
Andrea Farr and her kids use Utah Department of Transportation’s Walking School Bus app when they opt out of driving to school and walk instead.
Each time they walked to school, they logged the experience into the app – entering for the chance to win a pancake breakfast with the Utah Jazz Bear. The Farrs won the contest, and Tuesday the Jazz Bear accompanied them and many other children in the neighborhood to Muir Elementary School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHS (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aHX (DN)

 

Police swarm elementary school with a motorcycle, K-9 and high fives for everyone

SOUTH JORDAN, Utah – The South Jordan Police Department gathered in force at Monte Vista Elementary School Tuesday morning, but there was nothing dangerous happening.
They were armed with jokes and cool props to impress the students and get their attention for a lesson about safety.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIe (KSTU)

 

America First Credit Union supports local youth, donating over 100 backpacks during annual Backpack Bonanza

RIVERDALE, UT – Supporting local youth in preparation for 2017- 2018 academic year, America First Credit Union employees volunteered during the Catholic Community Services of Northern Utah Backpack Bonanza on Thursday, Aug. 10 and Friday, Aug. 11. America First donated 107 backpacks and school supplies, which will benefit homeless, low-income and refugee children. Employees filled backpacks with notebooks, binders, pencil boxes, writing utensils and other supplies to ensure the students are equipped and ready prior to the first day of school. Last year, more than 3,000 backpacks were distributed to schools throughout Ogden and Salt Lake City.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIs (CUInsight)

 

————————————————————
OPINION & COMMENTARY
————————————————————

Why I support the DREAM Act
Deseret News op-ed by Pamela Portocarrero

I may have been born in Lima, Peru, 28 years ago, but I am very much an American. I have called the United States home since my family moved to Utah when I was 10 years old. My mother, sister and I fled Peru because of the dire poverty, terrorism and the corrupt government. She wanted to give her children the opportunity to succeed in life.
Today, I hold two bachelor’s degrees from the University of Utah and a master’s degree in public administration from Old Dominion University. I am also married and have worked with high school students, preparing them for their post-graduation plans. I have been able to accomplish this, and so much more, thanks to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Consequently, my life, along with millions of others, would be torn apart by the stroke of a pen if the current administration and Congress eliminate the DACA program.
Many of the nearly 800,000 DACA recipients in this country, along with their families, share a story like mine. In the summer of 2012, DACA gave us a path to come out of the shadows and live without fear in the only country most of us have ever known as home.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHN

 

Local property taxes are a big problem
(Provo) Daily Herald letter

Am I the only one that thinks our property taxes are out of reach? Mine has gone up 25 percent, and yours maybe more.
I live in the old part of town, so the city fathers say. I have at least six four-plexes with low-income families on each side of me. I know people have to have a place to live, but why should I pay 25 percent more to live in this neighborhood with low-income housing; my house is only 900 square feet.
And another thing — why do retirees have to pay so much to the Nebo School District? Our kids are raised, let the families with six to eight kids pay the taxes. They are the ones who benefit from this and then they can take a tax deferment at the end of the year with their taxes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aI4

 

Why should teachers have to work for free?
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Verla Withers

Why does a person who has completed four years of learning how to be a teacher have to teach one year without pay? They are letting people teach who have had no schooling teach and get paid for it, while the person who has gone to college for four years gets no pay. How is that fair?
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHU

I Teach in Houston. I’m Worried for My Students.
New York Times op-ed by LISA LYNEÉ DANIELS, a high school history teacher

HOUSTON – I’m sitting in a bedroom in my friend’s house in southwest Houston, terrified for my city. The rain has poured down nonstop since Friday. I’m lucky to be safe and dry, but I worry for the thousands of others who are not as fortunate – particularly many of my students.
I teach United States history to 11th graders at a charter school, KIPP Houston High School, which has 945 students. Most of them live in areas that are prone to flooding, and the principal is hard at work getting donations for those in need.
One of my students was being evacuated when I called to check up on her. I can only imagine what she and other kids are going through right now.
More than 160 public school districts and 30 charter schools in Texas have been closed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHP

 

————————————————————-
NATIONAL NEWS
————————————————————-

Harvey delays opening of many Texas schools; some become shelters
Though school districts in the Houston area have postponed classes at least until next Tuesday, their buildings and employees are central to providing relief for people needing shelter during the Hurricane Harvey floods.
Texas Tribune

Last Thursday, Superintendent Wanda Bamberg honored Aldine ISD students who took extra classes this summer to graduate. The next morning, she and her teachers were putting library books on higher shelves, where they would be less likely to be inundated by flooding.
“We were celebrating for the kids Thursday and then trying to protect the rest of them on Friday,” she said.
Instead of overseeing the Houston-area school district this week, Bamberg is helping oversee relief efforts at two Aldine ISD buildings being used to shelter evacuees as Hurricane Harvey continues to flood Southeast Texas. According to a state tally, all 51 school districts across the Houston area have postponed the start of classes until next Tuesday, affecting more than 1 million students, as they figure out how their infrastructure will recover from the unprecedented volume of water now blocking highways and destroying homes.
More than 200 school districts experienced delays due to the storm, by the state’s estimated count. Those ranged from a couple of hours in nearly 10 Central Texas districts to indefinite closures in four smaller school districts farther south on the Gulf Coast.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHQ

http://gousoe.uen.org/aIk (Ed Week)

 

Houston Teacher’s Reading Group Comforts Students in Hurricane Aftermath
Education Week

As torrential rains and destructive flooding brought on by Hurricane Harvey continue to plague the Houston area, and schools remain closed until at least after Labor Day, one teacher is using books to bring her district together in the midst of the storm. Kathryn Butler Mills, a 2nd grade teacher at WoodCreek Elementary in Katy, Texas, created a public Facebook group on Sunday to encourage kids to read as they wait out the hurricane.
The Hurricane Harvey Book Club, which features videos of students, teachers, and authors reading their favorite books aloud, started with invites to 70 of Mills’ students, fellow educators, and friends. The group had swelled to more than 27,000 members as of Wednesday morning, and that number continues to grow. Mills started the group as a way to take students’ minds off of the situation and encourage them to keep reading. Group members are now writing in with encouraging messages to stay safe and strong.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHR

 

LDS student body president organizes food, clothing drive for Harvey evacuees

TOMBALL, Texas – Cypress Woods High School student body president Haley Gunderson wasn’t expecting much when she put the word out on social media for donations for Harvey evacuees.
But after the football team and other school organizations got involved, mountains of clothes, food and hygiene items poured in. In all, the teens hauled seven truckloads of supplies to a newly opened shelter.
“It was really cool to see everyone come together and do that,” said Gunderson, a member of the Cypress Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHV (DN)

 

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos tours ‘examples of what schools should aspire to be’
Her Tallahassee appearance drew protesters and enhanced security measures at two local schools.
Tallahassee (FL) Democrat

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos toured a STEM lab, competed with students in a computer-based language exercise and read to kindergartners Tuesday while a dozen protesters lined Fleischmann Road across from the Holy Comforter Episcopal School.
An advocate for school vouchers and charter schools, DeVos was on a two-day visit to Tallahassee with stops at Holy Comforter and Florida High, a Florida State University developmental research school. A philanthropist who supported school privatization efforts before joining President Donald J. Trump’s cabinet, DeVos said she wanted to see first-hand how Holy Comforter and Florida High are “uniquely” meeting the “individual needs” of students.
“They are examples of what schools should aspire to be,” said DeVos about the two schools she visited Tuesday. DeVos also will spend Wednesday in Tallahassee, where she is scheduled to visit Bethel Family Life Center, a community outreach facility that includes an after school program run by Bethel Missionary Baptist Church.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIo

 

DeVos to speak at Mackinac GOP conference
Detroit News

Lansing – U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos will attend and speak at the Mackinac Republican Leadership Conference in late September, the Michigan Republican Party announced Wednesday.
DeVos, a wealthy school reform advocate tapped for the education post by President Donald Trump, hails from west Michigan and previously served as chair of the state party.
“I am very excited to welcome my good friend Betsy back home and have her speak at our conference,” current chair Ron Weiser said in a statement. “Michiganders have known Betsy for years as a leader, innovator, and champion for all students.”
DeVos, who has faced intense backlash from Democrats and public education groups since taking office, adds to a growing roster of speakers for the biennial Mackinac Island conference, scheduled for Sept. 22-24 at the Grand Hotel.
Republican National Committeewoman Ronna Romney McDaniel of Michigan is expected at the conference, and the state party announced Friday that former Utah Congressman Jason Chaffetz will also speak. Chaffetz resigned at the end of June and is now a Fox News contributor.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIu

 

State Ed. Chiefs Have New Duties. But Does Their Pay Match Up?
Despite new ESSA-era responsibilities, many earn much less than heads of big local districts
Education Week

The stakes are higher than ever for state education chiefs under the Every Student Succeeds Act-but whether they’re being compensated any better is a much murkier picture, an Education Week salary review shows.
State schools superintendents today lead often-emaciated departments tasked with lengthy federal and state to-do lists. They’re also directly in charge of designing and implementing state accountability systems and improving their states’ worst-performing schools under the new federal K-12 law that kicks into high gear this school year.
Despite that, state chiefs are paid, on average, $174,000-about $60,000 less than the average pay for the superintendent leading their state’s largest district, according to an Education Week analysis of the most recently made available data.
There are some big outliers along the way. Mississippi, for example, which has the nation’s 46th lowest per-pupil spending rates, pays its state chief, Carey Wright, $300,000-the highest salary of any state superintendent.
And Arizona, which has the country’s 49th lowest per-pupil spending, pays its state chief Diane Douglas $85,000, the lowest state salary in the nation.
But of the 19 superintendents who were hired after ESSA was passed in 2015, only four received a bump in pay compared to their predecessors. And about half the nation’s chiefs were paid either the same or less than those they replaced, even as they took on the new responsibilities and pressures associated with ESSA.
That all comes on the heels of an already tough recruiting climate for state chiefs, who last on the job for barely two years on average.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIi

State Superintendent salary data
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIj (Ed Week)

 

Family of Boy Who Wears Dresses Sues Education Department
New York Times

A 5-year-old named Leo sat surrounded by toys on the floor of his bedroom in Brooklyn this week marked with some classic little-boy touches: hair in his eyes and a scab on one knee.
The outfit he had chosen for himself that day was less stereotypical: pink cowboy boots, dusty pink shorts and a denim vest that showed off the temporary rose tattoo on his tiny biceps.
Leo is a boy, and since before he could speak, his parents said, he has gravitated toward things traditionally associated with girls – he loves pink and Barbies and anything that sparkles. He likes to wear dresses. His parents describe him as “gender expansive,” and in the liberal enclave of Park Slope, Brooklyn, where Leo has lived all his life, he has encountered far less resistance than he might have elsewhere.
But when he started kindergarten last year, his parents said, that changed.
Leo’s parents, Danielle Super and Michael Davis, filed a lawsuit last week with the New York City Commission on Human Rights that says Public School 107 in Park Slope created a hostile environment for their son, in violation of his rights. The suit also contends that school officials reported Ms. Super on suspicion of child abuse after Leo made a comment about his genitals.
The Department of Education says that school staff members have a legal obligation to report any suspicion of abuse. But the family says the decision to report what would normally be viewed as childish bathroom humor grew from pernicious stereotypes about gender expression and sexual abuse.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIn

 

Officials grappling with Confederate names on public schools
Associated Press

With a new school year dawning, education officials are grappling with whether to remove the names, images and statues of Confederate figures from public schools – especially since some are now filled with students of color.
The violence at a white nationalist rally over a Robert E. Lee statue in Charlottesville, Virginia, is giving school officials a new reason to reconsider whether it’s appropriate for more than 100 schools to be named after Confederate generals and politicians from the Old South.
“It does not make sense to have schools named after individuals who were directly connected to that dark past, and force kids in Dallas, a majority minority population, to walk into these schools every day and have to face this past every single day,” said Miguel Solis, former board president and current board member of the Dallas Independent School District.
Dallas, along with other cities, began moving to change Confederate names and imagery after white nationalist and Confederate enthusiast Dylann Roof murdered nine black churchgoers in Charleston, South Carolina on June 17, 2015.
But the reviews gained momentum after the Aug. 12 protest by white supremacists in Charlottesville, which left one counter-protester dead.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIg

 

Native American students can skip conquistador pageantry
Associated Press

SANTA FE, N.M. – Schools in New Mexico’s capital city are giving students permission to skip an annual reenactment of Spanish colonial royal court festivities led by a conquistador, out of deference to Native Americans that may find it disrespectful.
Santa Fe Public Schools Superintendent Veronica Garcia on Tuesday directed schools to allow students to opt-out of watching a performance linked to the Santa Fe Fiesta that honors Spanish conquistador Don Diego de Vargas.
De Vargas reclaimed Santa Fe a dozen years after the Spanish were driven out in the 1680 Pueblo Revolt. A “fiesta court” of Spanish colonial royalty visits schools this week to dance and promote various community events.
Garcia says it has become clear that some Native American and non-Christian students feel uncomfortable at the fiesta school performances.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIh

 

Memes, Emojis, and GIFs, Oh My! Teachers Tell How They Use Social Media
Education Week

Most teachers think that social media and texting have a negative effect on their students’ grammar and spelling skills, a new survey finds-but many educators still turn to social media tools to better relate to their students.
The survey, which was conducted by YouGov on behalf of Dictionary.com, asked 801 teachers-in elementary grades through postgraduate schools-about their views on social media and pop culture in the classroom.
Half of the teachers surveyed said that social media helps them better understand the pop culture references students are making in class. And in an effort to meet students where they are, 37 percent of teachers have used memes, emojis, and GIFs (animated images) to help make a point or teach a lesson.
Still, 73 percent of teachers think that social media and texting negatively affect their students’ grammar and spelling skills.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIl

 

Seattle Dads Take Campaign to Eliminate School Lunch Debt Statewide
NBC

Two Seattle-area dads are working to raise enough money to pay off school lunch debt in the state of Washington after one previously eliminated debt in three of the state’s largest school districts.
Jeffrey Lew began working to eliminate lunch debt in May after reading a news article about “school lunch shaming,” where students who don’t have enough money to pay for lunch are denied food, singled-out with stamps or wrist bands, or given an alternate meal.
He raised funds to erase the $97.10 lunch debt at his son’s school, then expanded his efforts to the Seattle Public Schools district and four other school districts in Washington. In total, Lew has raised more than $100,000 from donors including singer John Legend and the Seattle Seahawks Charitable Foundation, he said. Three of his first five campaigns successfully eliminated lunch debt in their districts.
Lew’s new goal, which he announced last week, is to raise $650,000 to cover all outstanding school lunch debt in Washington, though he is still waiting to hear from several school districts about their total lunch debt, he noted.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aHT

Ed. Dept.’s Pitch to Scale Back Collection of AP Test Data Raises Eyebrows
Education Week

The U.S. Department of Education is contemplating changes to its signature Civil Rights Data Collection for the coming school year, including asking districts for new information on computer science and Internet connectivity, while scaling back requirements for collecting Advanced Placement test data.
The department wants to stop asking districts for data on Advanced Placement performance-how well students do on the tests. But it would keep in place AP participation data-how many kids take the tests.
That’s raised eyebrows among some advocates for educators, civil rights groups, and the College Board, the nonprofit that administers the exam. They’re worried that looking only at participation in the courses will gloss over whether students, including historically disadvantaged groups of kids, are mastering college-level work.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIm

 

————————————————————
CALENDAR
————————————————————

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

September 7:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 8:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 13:

Education Interim Committee meeting
10 a.m., 1575 S State Street, SLC
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

September 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
https://www.utahscsb.org/2017

September 19:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

September 20:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

October 17:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPEXE

Related posts:

Leave a Reply