Education News Roundup: Aug. 31, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Housekeeping note: ENR is taking Friday off. The roundup will return on Tuesday.

Logan town hall meeting focuses on teacher recruitment and retention.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIO (LHJ)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aJl (CVD)

Jordan School Board bars gathering of petition signatures at school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIN (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aJa (DN via KSL)

Feds approve four more state ESSA plans.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIR (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aIS (ED)

Georgia Supreme Court rules that self-defense may be a justification for fighting in school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIT (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)
or a copy of the ruling
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIU (Georgia Supreme Court)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Legislative town hall focuses on attracting and retaining teachers

Jordan School Board: No signature gathering on school property

Cache County School District changes taking shape

Ogden, Weber school districts accepting bond initiative arguments

New program seeks to add teachers’ voices to policy discussions

Finalists for presidential awards in mathematics, science teaching announced

Local charter school sends students to see eclipse in totality

Cure for the tedious science class

Utah Catholic Schools alumni: Parochial education gives solid foundation for careers, life

New principal for St. Andrew School

Tooele football coach to be fired following arrest in prostitution sting
He becomes second Tooele High football coach to resign or be fired this year

Missing Centerville teen last seen at school found safe

Pay it Forward: Sippy Cups & Chardonnay

Credit union donates 100 backpacks, supplies to needy students

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Lead is for pencils, not water.
We should require schools to test for lead.

Yours truly inducted into a high school hall of fame? Pigs really do fly

Public School Officials Are Artificially Inflating Graduation Rates. I’ve Seen It Myself
Fraudulent graduation practice give the false sense of progress

A Look at College Applications by 2009 High School Freshman

NATION

Betsy DeVos Approves Four More State ESSA Plans

Harvey wreaks havoc on Houston schools

HISD students to receive three free meals a day for 2017-2018 school year

How Teachers Can Help With Hurricane Harvey Relief

Illinois governor set to sign school funding overhaul

State Supreme Court: Georgia students can argue self-defense to justify school fights

Nevada Education Department postpones school ratings release

An Unlikely ESSA Provision: Warning on Copyright Piracy

Jackson Public Schools board will evaluate Confederate namesakes

Superintendent with sky-high salary charged with corruption

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Legislative town hall focuses on attracting and retaining teachers

Solutions to attracting and retaining teachers are complicated, but Utah education experts discussed some possibilities at a legislative town hall on Wednesday night at the Historic Cache County Courthouse.
Utah School Superintendent Association Executive Director Terry Shoemaker said the entire nation has faced a teacher shortage since 2014 and it affects Utah in dramatic fashion. Data show that large numbers of new teachers in the Beehive State were not fully qualified in districts that use alternative licensure programs, he said.
“What that means is that’s not the traditional way of becoming to be a teacher,” Shoemaker said. “There simply were not enough teachers to fill those positions, OK? They just simply were not there.”
Teacher retention is arguably an even worse problem. Shoemaker said 56 percent of new teachers in 2008 were no longer teaching in 2015.
“That is something, from a state policy perspective, we ought to be concerned about,” he said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIO (LHJ)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aJl (CVD)

 

Jordan School Board: No signature gathering on school property

WEST JORDAN — There will no signature gathering on Jordan School District property for any statewide initiative drive.
Acting on a request by the Jordan Education Association to gather signatures in support of the Our Schools Now citizens initiative, the school board voted Tuesday to ban signature gathering for initiatives altogether.
Had the board allowed teachers, on their own time, to collect signatures from fellow school employees for the Our Schools Now effort, it would have to permit access to collect signatures for a statewide medical marijuana initiative or any other citizen initiative, according to its legal counsel.
“I, for one, think it’s opening up a Pandora’s box I’m not interested in opening,” said board member Matthew Young.
But board member Marilyn Richards said she had mixed emotions about the teachers’ request.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIN (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aJa (DN via KSL)

 

Cache County School District changes taking shape

With the start of the new school year last week, several changes were evident in Cache County schools. Among the most obvious was the grand opening of Green Canyon High School in North Logan. Kirk McRae, Human Resources Director of the Cache County School District, said the opening of Green Canyon was part of a “two-year transformation” which started last year with the opening of Ridgeline High School.
Included in this transformation, which was first enacted on the south end of the valley last school year, 6th grade was added to the elementary schools and 9th graders were integrated into the high schools. This left 7th and 8th graders to attend a school of their own. “This year with the opening of Green Canyon High School, we completed the transformation by doing the same on the north end,” said McRae. The shift required that Cedar Ridge and White Pine 6th and 7th-grade centers be turned into K-6 elementary schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJ4 (CVD)

 

Ogden, Weber school districts accepting bond initiative arguments

OGDEN — The Ogden and Weber school district are accepting written arguments for or against bond initiatives both are putting to voters this November.
Per Utah law, any eligible voter within the district pursuing the bond can submit an argument for or against the bond initiative.
The law also states if more than one argument is submitted the district’s election officer — in this case, the business administrators — will select one.
The Ogden School District is seeking approval of a $106.5 million bond to build junior high Professional Gateway Centers, rebuild three elementary schools and rebuild the Ben Lomond High School gym. Approving the bond would not increase taxes.
The Weber School District is asking for a $97 million bond to build two new elementary schools, add on to Fremont High School, renovate Roy Junior High School and build an addition at Weber Innovation High School. If approved, this would also not increase taxes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJ0 (OSE)

 

New program seeks to add teachers’ voices to policy discussions

A new state teacher fellowship program is looking to get educators’ voices into policy discussions.
The Hope Street Group and the National Network of State Teachers of the Year have paired up to start the Utah Teacher Fellows program, which joins a handful of state teacher fellow programs in the nation.
“We want teachers to be part of the conversation,” said Tabitha Pacheco, the director of the Utah Teacher Fellows.
The 20 teachers come from throughout Utah, with several from Utah County. They are being mentored by former state teachers of the year.
One of those is Gay Beck, a kindergarten teacher at Highland Elementary School who was the Utah Teacher of the Year in 2011.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJ1 (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aJ2 (USBE)

 

Finalists for presidential awards in mathematics, science teaching announced

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah State Board of Education has announced the four 2017 Utah finalists for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching.
They are:

  • Rachel Rolf, Hillside Middle School, Salt Lake City School District, mathematics
  • Mike Spencer, Juab High School, Juab School District, mathematics
  • Deborah Morgan, South Sevier High School, Sevier School District, science
  • Meghan Zarnetske, Treasure Mountain Junior High, Park City School District, science

http://gousoe.uen.org/aIX (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aIY (USBE)

 

Local charter school sends students to see eclipse in totality

One hundred and thirty-five students and parents from Franklin Discovery Academy, a local K-6 charter school in Vineyard, traveled to Idaho Falls, Idaho to experience the eclipse in totality.
Students from the school had the option to attend an eclipse party at the school or participate in the field trip. Students left at 4:30 a.m. and made it to the viewing location at host school American Heritage Charter School in Idaho Falls by 10 a.m.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJ3 (PDH)

 

Cure for the tedious science class

Students are humming tunes about integers, giggling about phosphorus puns and reacting to a live Tesla Coil thanks to Sadie Bowman and Ricky Coates of Matheatre, which brings music and humor to the serious task of helping high school and college students understand and memorize math and science concepts.
“We consider our job to be reinforcing and supporting the work that math and science teachers are doing, and to inspire conversations and explorations,” said Bowman.
The company’s productions, “Calculus: The Musical,” “Tesla Ex Machina” and “Curie Me Away!” provide a context to appreciate calculus, electrical engineering, chemistry and physics and are accessible to both those who love math and science and those who don’t, said Bowman.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJk (South Valley Journal)

 

Utah Catholic Schools alumni: Parochial education gives solid foundation for careers, life

SALT LAKE CITY — Thousands of students have passed through the doors of Utah’s three Catholic high schools over the years, earning education, experience and a chance for their faith in God to grow. Three alumni, each of whom graduated from a different Catholic high school, told their story of how their school shaped the rest of their lives.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJm (IC)

 

New principal for St. Andrew School

RIVERTON — St. Andrew School welcomes a new face among its faculty, Erin Carrabba, who will be the school’s new principal. Carrabba lived in New Jersey before coming to Utah in January and has already fallen in love with the state and her new position, she said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJo (IC)

 

Tooele football coach to be fired following arrest in prostitution sting
He becomes second Tooele High football coach to resign or be fired this year

SALT LAKE CITY — A Tooele High School assistant football coach has been placed on unpaid administrative leave and is expected to be fired following a recent arrest in Salt Lake City.
Mark Lyne Jackson, 39, of Tooele, was arrested during a weeklong prostitution sting conducted last week by Salt Lake police. He was arrested Aug. 23 for investigation of patronizing a prostitute.
Jackson “arranged with an undercover officer to pay cash in exchange for sex acts,” according to a Salt Lake County Jail report. Police say the incident occurred at 340 N. 900 West.
Tooele School District spokeswoman Marie Denson said Jackson was placed on administrative leave Aug. 24, then unpaid administrative leave on Tuesday, and will be officially considered terminated as of Sept. 7.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIW (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aJb (DN via KSL)

 

Missing Centerville teen last seen at school found safe

A missing 15-year-old who was last seen at school Tuesday has been found safe.
Jaci Brielle Lowry was located “safe and sound” and is at home with her family, according to a post on the Centerville Police Department’s Facebook page.
Police thanked those who helped look for her.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJ5 (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aJ6 (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aJ7 (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aJ8 (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aJ9 (Gephardt Daily)

 

Pay it Forward: Sippy Cups & Chardonnay

A small group of moms in Utah grew into a non-profit made up of hundreds of women across the state who like to give back to their community.
It’s called Sippy Cups & Chardonnay.
Kelly Wood, president and founder of the group, describes the nonprofit as “a bunch of moms that like to drink wine and give back in our community.”
They do service projects in Salt Lake County all year long.
“We do Christmas projects, we do Easter, we do Thanksgiving, and we do back to school,” Wood said. “It’s a lot of fun for everyone.”
And you don’t have to drink wine to join!
“You just have to be a mom that likes to volunteer and hang out with other moms,” she said.
Their most recent project was a back to school supply drive where the moms collected tons of school supplies and put them into backpacks.
“We are supporting all 71 Title I schools in Salt Lake County,” Wood said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJj (KUTV)

 

Credit union donates 100 backpacks, supplies to needy students

OGDEN — America First Credit Union employees donated 107 backpacks filled with school supplies as part of the Catholic Community Services of Northern Utah’s Backpack Bonanza.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIZ (DN)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Lead is for pencils, not water.
We should require schools to test for lead.
Salt Lake Tribune editorial

It seems that we’ve been poisoning our kids. Or, at least, our schools have.
Almost 90 percent of the 249 school water systems recently tested for lead showed some level of lead in the drinking water. Six schools in the Granite School District had water containing “levels of lead that exceed the Environmental Protection Agency’s ‘action level’ of 15 micrograms per liter.” Three more schools also had lead levels above federal guidelines. That’s a lot of lead.
Only 10 percent of schools tested have drinking water that is entirely lead-free. Only 25 percent of Utah’s schools have been tested so far.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIV

Yours truly inducted into a high school hall of fame? Pigs really do fly
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Paul Rolly

Back when the United States was preparing to invade Iraq, Charles Barkley uttered the following astute observation:
“You know the world is off tilt when the best rapper is a white guy [Eminem], the best golfer is a black guy [Tiger Woods], the tallest basketball player is Chinese [Yao Ming] and Germany doesn’t want to go to war.”
Add to that conundrum this: A “C” student with self-esteem issues and attendance problems in his teenage years being inducted into his high school hall of fame.
Friday morning, I’ll be doing the same thing my Salt Lake Tribune columnist-colleague Robert Kirby did 13 years ago: I’ll go to the principal’s office at Skyline High School.
Like Kirby, as he acknowledged in his column about that day in 2004, I was summoned to the principal’s office frequently during my high school years. But those were not pleasant experiences. That meant I was in trouble.
Again.
This time, I’ll be checking in at the office, then head to the gymnasium for the homecoming assembly, where I will be inducted into the Skyline Hall of Fame and have a plaque with my name and image placed on a wall near the main office next to some impressive people.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJn

Public School Officials Are Artificially Inflating Graduation Rates. I’ve Seen It Myself
Fraudulent graduation practice give the false sense of progress
Education Week op-ed by Bernard Gassaway, former New York City public schools teacher, principal, and superintendent of alternative schools and programs

In the age of accountability ushered in by the No Child Left Behind law in 2002 and continued under 2015’s Every Student Succeeds Act, many school officials are using fraudulent methods to inflate graduation rates.
As a direct result of a public thirst for schools to show progress, boards of education pressure superintendents, superintendents squeeze principals, principals ride teachers, and teachers stress students. The ultimate measure of progress for schools nationwide is high school graduation rates.
Public school officials use a variety of schemes to give the appearance of progress.
Credit recovery is one strategy that school officials use to allow students to quickly make up for classes they have failed, without receiving formal instruction. Credit recovery is a national practice, though it may be called something else. In fact, “credit recovery” is a broad term that encompasses multiple strategies, some more effective than others. Blended learning, virtual learning, after-school programs, summer school, weekend school, and night school are all credit-recovery strategies.
I experienced the worst of this practice when I became principal of New York City’s Boys and Girls High School in 2009.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJh

 

A Look at College Applications by 2009 High School Freshman
National Center for Education Statistics analysis

A new report finds that nearly 80 percent of students who were high school freshmen in 2009 applied or registered for postsecondary education four years later.
The National Center for Education Statistics released College Applications by 2009 High School Freshmen: Differences by Race/Ethnicity today (Aug. 31). This report uses data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) 2013 Update collection which gathers information on college applications by high school freshmen four years later.
Among the findings:

  • Asian/Pacific Islander students had the highest percentage of postsecondary applicants/registrants, at 91 percent. American Indian/Alaska Native students had the lowest percentage of postsecondary applicants/registrants at 63 percent.
  • Forty-three percent of Hispanics/Latino students, 40 percent of non-Hispanic White students, and 37 percent of Black students applied to/registered at only one institution. The percentage was smaller (26 percent) for Asian/Pacific Islander students.

http://gousoe.uen.org/aIM

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Betsy DeVos Approves Four More State ESSA Plans
Education Week

The District of Columbia, Illinois, Oregon, and Tennessee all won approval from U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy Devos Wednesday for their accountability plans under the Every Student Succeeds Act.
The plans detail how states will go about complying with the federal law in the coming years. The law goes into effect this fall.
DeVos has now approved 10 of the 17 submitted state ESSA plans. All of the states that have turned in plans have received feedback from the department.
“As more and more state plans come under the department’s review, I am heartened to see how states have embraced the spirit of flexibility under ESSA to improve education for individual students,” DeVos said in a news release.
Next month, 34 states are expected to turn in their plans, many of which will be voted on by state board members and reviewed by governors in the coming weeks.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIR

http://gousoe.uen.org/aIS (ED)

 

Harvey wreaks havoc on Houston schools
USA Today

Kristen McClintock should have been at work teaching special education classes at Houston’s Westside High School on Wednesday afternoon.
Instead, she stood in an isolated corner of the city’s cavernous George R. Brown Convention Center, trying to figure out how to create a comforting “sensory space” for students with autism, who are sensitive to noise.
“It’s loud,” McClintock said. “It’s loud everywhere in here.”
Like her 31,000 colleagues throughout Houston, McClintock doesn’t know when the school year will begin, but she chose not to wait — she signed up to volunteer at the convention center, where thousands of area families have sought shelter amid historic flooding from Tropical Storm Harvey.
Across Houston, classes were scheduled to begin last Monday, but Harvey scuttled those plans, not just for Houston Independent School District — Texas’ largest and the USA’s fourth-largest — but for systems throughout the region. About 216,000 students attend school in the Houston district alone.
Superintendent Richard Carranza said he hoped to begin classes on Sept. 5, but that other, more pressing issues confront his city at the moment. “They’re still plucking people off of roofs,” he said.
The storm impacted more than 1 million students in 244 public and charter school districts statewide, the Texas Education Agency said, though a few have since returned to school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIP

 

HISD students to receive three free meals a day for 2017-2018 school year
(Houston) KHOU

HOUSTON — The Houston Independent School District announced Wednesday all students will eat all school meals for free during the 2017-2018 school year.
The approval came from the United States Department of Agriculture and the Texas Department of Agriculture to waive the required application process for the National School Lunch/Breakfast Program.
HISD says the free meals come in the wake of flooding from Tropical Storm Harvey.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJc

 

How Teachers Can Help With Hurricane Harvey Relief
Education Week

“The rain has poured down nonstop since Friday. I’m lucky to be safe and dry, but I worry for the thousands of others who are not as fortunate—particularly many of my students,” writes a Houston teacher in The New York Times.
While it’s back to school for most of the country, in Texas, the historic Hurricane Harvey has shuttered hundreds of schools districts until after Labor day, or in many cases indefinitely. And now dozens of Louisiana districts are in the storm’s path as well.
Teachers and students who have returned to the classroom are no doubt asking how they can help.
DonorsChoose, a website that helps teachers fundraise for classroom projects, has set up a Hurricane Harvey Recovery fund, which is gaining traction quickly. The fund “will help teachers rebuild and restock their classrooms with materials like books, furniture, classroom supplies, technology, and therapy resources,” according to the site, and it’s raised nearly $600,000 as of Wednesday afternoon.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJi

 

Illinois governor set to sign school funding overhaul
Associated Press

CHICAGO — Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner is set to sign legislation Thursday that will change the way the state funds schools, a plan he said will ensure every child “gets a chance at an excellent education regardless of their parents’ income” or where they live.
Besides distributing state aid more equitably, the long-sought deal the Legislature approved this week gives districts more flexibility on state mandates, allows residents in well-funded districts to reduce their property taxes and creates a new tax credit for donations to private school scholarships.
It also provides more than $430 million in new funding to Chicago Public Schools. That’s roughly $150 million more than the amount Rauner stripped from an earlier plan and railed against as a “bailout.” Asked Wednesday about the turnaround, the Republican said the measure is a compromise and includes “many of the goals I recommended.”
Here’s a look at the plan:
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIQ

State Supreme Court: Georgia students can argue self-defense to justify school fights
Atlanta Journal-Constitution

In its first decision in a school discipline case, the Georgia Supreme Court ruled zero tolerance policies on school fighting cannot deny students the right to assert they were defending themselves. The court said Georgia law gives students the legal right to argue self-defense as a justification.
Georgia Code states, “A person is justified in threatening or using force against another when…he or she reasonably believes that such threat or force is necessary to defend himself or herself or a third person against such other’s imminent use of unlawful force.”
In essence, the state’s highest court ruled that Georgia law on self-defense trumps school zero tolerance policies on fighting.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIT

A copy of the ruling
http://gousoe.uen.org/aIU (Georgia Supreme Court)

 

Nevada Education Department postpones school ratings release
Associated Press

RENO, Nev.— The Nevada Department of Education is postponing the release of its new school rating system after districts statewide complained the preliminary numbers don’t seem to make sense.
State Superintendent of Instruction Steve Canavero says they need more time to review technical changes to make sure the framework is accurate. He says the original release date set for Sept. 15 has been pushed back to December.
School district officials in Clark and Washoe counties have been warning for months that many schools would see their ratings decline under the new framework.
The Nevada Association of School Superintendents says the preliminary data confirmed those fears. They say the ratings have pushed ratings downward dramatically in many schools “for no evidence-based reason.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJd

 

An Unlikely ESSA Provision: Warning on Copyright Piracy
Education Week

The Every Student Succeeds Act covers a vast swath of federal education policy, from testing to teacher-training to turning around struggling schools. But language tucked into the 400-plus-page statute also has another, less-expected goal: informing students and parents about “the harms of copyright piracy.”
Wording that urges school officials and parents to explain the importance of preventing the illicit use of copyrighted material is found in three sections of the law, alongside more predictable school policy decrees on teaching and learning.
It turns out the language can be traced to the insertion of an amendment to the massive statute made at the urging of a coalition of film-, music-, and publishing-industry organizations, which have fought for years to establish stronger copyright protections.
The wording reflects the long-standing interest among those influential lobbies in preventing online files, images, and print and digital resources from being copied and shared without permission. Their worries extend to K-12 districts, where some industry officials see the copying as widespread among students and teachers in and outside of school.
An amendment to ESSA including the copyright-piracy language was introduced by Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., and agreed to by a legislative committee on its way to being included in the Republican-led drafting of the law. Jeffries argued that the language would encourage parents and students to learn to respect the rules of intellectual property and protect the work of artists and other creators who do not want their work illicitly shared.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJg

Jackson Public Schools board will evaluate Confederate namesakes
Jackson (MS) Clarion-Ledger

School board members of a predominately black Mississippi district say they’re ready to begin a community dialogue around sites named in honor of Confederate leaders and soldiers.
The Jackson School Board has agreed to form a committee tasked with discussing school namesakes after Ward 7 board member Jed Oppenheim broached the topic at an Aug. 24 board meeting.
“This is something that I have brought up multiple times over the last couple of years and it keeps on moving aside..given the current state of affairs in our country, I think we need to revisit this,” Oppenheim told colleagues.
Three elementary schools in the district — Davis Magnet, George Elementary and Lee Elementary are named after Confederate figures Jefferson Davis, James Zachariah George and Robert E. Lee respectively, according to a district website detailing school namesakes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJe

 

Superintendent with sky-high salary charged with corruption
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — A former Southern California school board superintendent who made more than $600,000 in a year has been charged with a dozen counts of corruption.
The charges were filed Wednesday against Jose Fernandez, who drew the massive compensation package despite overseeing just a handful of schools in the Centinela Valley School District.
Three years after his firing, Fernandez was charged with six counts of conflict of interest, three of misappropriation of public funds, two of grand theft and one of embezzlement.
Prosecutors say he manipulated the school board and its policies to dramatically increase his pay, and unlawfully created supplemental retirement programs to benefit himself.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aJf

 

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CALENDAR
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UEN News
http://www.uen.org

September 7:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 8:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

September 13:

Education Interim Committee meeting
10 a.m., 1575 S State Street, SLC
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

September 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
https://www.utahscsb.org/2017

September 19:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

September 20:

Education Interim Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

October 17:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPEXE

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