Education News Roundup: Sept. 22, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Park City deals with high opt-out rates on SAGE.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMj (PR)

Utah Association of Public Charter Schools names Syracuse Arts Academy the Outstanding Charter School of the Year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aM0 (OSE)

ENR notes with sadness the passing of former Utah State Board of Education Member Greg Haws.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aLZ (OSE)

ED approves Massachusetts’ ESSA plan.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aLT (Ed Week)
or http://gousoe.uen.org/aLU (ED)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

SAGE scores sink in Park City as students drop test
Almost 50 percent of Park City High School students are opting out

Syracuse Arts Academy named Outstanding Charter School of the Year

Ogden School Board officially picks Polk Elementary for rebuild if bond passes

Former Weber County clerk/auditor remembered for ‘tireless public service’

In Salt Lake City speech, Michelle Obama preaches hope as she cringes at climate of fear
‘It isn’t just us first,’ she says of America First agenda.

What Obama’s secretary of Education tells his kids about Trump: The battle is never over

‘Code to Success’ is giving students a head start on their career

Logan High enters Pro Football Hall of Fame thanks to Merlin Olsen

Disabled Orem High football player realizes dream

Oakridge Elementary cancels outdoor recess after cougar spotted in woods behind school

West High School dealing with bat problem

Utah Education and Telehealth Network Announces Partnership with Instructure

Staker Parson Companies Teaches Students How To Be Truck Smart
Staker Parson Companies joined a Utah Department of Transportation Zero Fatalities Truck Smart presentation at the Box Elder High School, in Brigham City, Utah Wednesday.

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Nine States Do Not Include Measures of Healthy Schools in ESSA’s Fifth Indicator

The School Climate Problem (and What We Can Do About It)
Students need emotional connection to school to be fully engaged

There’s a new call for Americans to embrace Chinese-style education. That’s a huge mistake.

Oh my God! School bans student-led prayers at football games

NATION

Betsy DeVos Approves Massachusetts Plan for ESSA Implementation

Florida’s ESSA Plan Leaves Out Struggling Student Scores in School Grades – but at What Cost?

New York Has Rewritten the Common Core. Here’s What You Need to Know.

Clark County teachers union, state parent group sue one another

Justice Sonia Sotomayor Aims to Expand Scope of Civics Education Efforts

Austin to consider buying Montopolis Negro School, creating museum

How California puts high school athletes at great risk

Does England’s rapid expansion of charter-like ‘academies’ hold a lesson for the U.S.?

One in three Chinese children faces an education apocalypse. An ambitious experiment hopes to save them

Four in 10 parents ‘asked to give to school funds’

 

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UTAH NEWS
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SAGE scores sink in Park City as students drop test
Almost 50 percent of Park City High School students are opting out

Nationwide, schools are required to test students in order to measure growth and learning over time, but when more than a quarter of the student population chooses not to take the test, those test scores are hard to evaluate.
The Utah State Board of Education announced last week that test scores for the Student Assessment of Growth and Excellence dropped throughout the state of Utah, including in Park City and South Summit School Districts. Students are tested at the end of the year in three subjects: language arts, mathematics and science.
In the Park City School District, scores in language arts dropped from 53.7 to 51.4 percent, mathematics from 54.5 to 51.1 percent and science from 58.7 to 53.2 percent. Melinda Colton, spokesperson for the Park City School District, said these may seem low, but they are higher than the state’s scores of 43.6, 45.7 and 47.5 percent. But, the district does not take these scores into account anyway post-fifth grade because of high opt-out rates.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMj (PR)

 

Syracuse Arts Academy named Outstanding Charter School of the Year

SYRACUSE – Syracuse Arts Academy has been named the Outstanding Charter School of the Year by the Utah Association of Public Charter Schools.
The academy was selected for the honor from 124 Utah charter schools, according to a news release.
“The school has served thousands of students in our community and provides the highest quality of education,” Lead Director Lex Puffer said in the release. “This truly is a testament to the hard work and dedication of the faculty and community at Syracuse Arts Academy.”
The academy specializes in arts integration and opened in 2006 to serve elementary and junior high school students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aM0 (OSE)

 

Ogden School Board officially picks Polk Elementary for rebuild if bond passes

OGDEN – The Ogden School District Board of Education officially selected Polk Elementary School for a potential rebuild, provided voters approve a bond initiative this fall.
The unanimous decision was made at a meeting Thursday, Sept. 21, after a lengthy discussion during the board’s work session, weighing input from the community with concerns for student safety and a desire to provide them with tech-friendly learning spaces.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aM1 (OSE)

 

Former Weber County clerk/auditor remembered for ‘tireless public service’

Greg Haws was a man who made a difference through his work.
Haws, who died Thursday, Sept. 14, following emergency surgery for a stomach ulcer, is recalled as a man behind many positive changes in Weber County government and in the State of Utah.
He was 65.

Haws was also elected to the state school board and served for 11 years, according to his obituary.
Haws became the treasurer of the National Association of State Boards of Education. But it was in his defeat in 2009 when he ran for Weber County treasurer that John Bond, who was the winner of that race, saw Haws’ true character.
Bond said he went to visit Haws after the election.
“Even though he had lost, he was so encouraging and so respectful,” Bond said of Haws. “I was so appreciative of the way he was. I was a fan of Greg’s.”
Those who spoke about Haws’ contributions often were emotional.
Spencer Stokes, a former Weber County commissioner and a member of the Utah State Board of Education, said Haws’ fiscal management was unbeatable.
“He was frugal before Frugal Dougall,” he said, referencing a slogan by John Dougall, the state auditor.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aLZ (OSE)

 

In Salt Lake City speech, Michelle Obama preaches hope as she cringes at climate of fear
‘It isn’t just us first,’ she says of America First agenda.

When asked how she views the world “right now,” former first lady Michelle Obama had less of an answer and more of a gut reaction.
She cringed and quietly groaned.
“I don’t have much of a poker voice,” Obama said with a laugh.

And while she acknowledged “things are tough right now” and suggested “we’re being tested,” Obama professed that she “continues to be hopeful” that the political climate will improve.
One avenue with potential, she believes, is technology. Echoing comments she made in June at Apple’s annual developer conference, Obama urged computing companies to invest in and hire more women (most major tech businesses, including Google, Facebook and Microsoft, have workforces where fewer than 20 percent of the technical employees are female, according to annual “diversity reports”).
Changing that composition, Obama said, will take encouraging girls at a young age to study science and math. It will mean bridging “the technology gap” that persists in low-income districts. It requires revisions to the public-school system. And it warrants forming hiring committees with more women and people of color.

As first lady, Obama focused on improving education, including initiatives for art classes and healthier lunches. But first moving into the White House, she joked Thursday, was a giant trust fall.
“It’s like being shot out of a cannon while drinking from a fire hydrant blind,” she said. “You have to tell the White House what kind of toilet paper you like. You don’t know where your forks are.”
The biggest challenge, Obama added, was raising two young daughters, Sasha and Malia, “under the glare of one of the harshest and biggest lights.” She and Barack Obama would go to parent teacher conferences with a 20-car presidential motorcade. They’d be asked to take photos in the stands at school sporting events. And they’d require Secret Service protection at proms and first dates.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMk (SLT)

 

What Obama’s secretary of Education tells his kids about Trump: The battle is never over

I ask Arne Duncan a question about the Trump administration’s dismantling of the Obama administration’s education policies, from practices protecting students from predatory lenders to ending protections for transgender students. He said he’d answer, but first he wanted to talk about the Bomb.
“I wish I had the luxury of just worrying about education policy,” he says. “I am more worried about nuclear war. I’m more worried about other stuff, very honestly, then I am about education policy.”
Duncan, Obama’s first secretary of education, was speaking at a conference for Pluralsight, a Utah-based online education company of which he became a board member last June. He was in Salt Lake City for the company’s announcement that it was joining Pledge 1%, a philanthropic program started by Salesforce founder Marc Benioff to encourage companies to donate 1% of either their time, profit, products, or equity to charitable causes. Pluralsight CEO Aaron Skonnard committed the company to donating 1% in each category.
Duncan spoke to Quartz about the opportunity gap for impoverished people in the US and around the world, explaining that income and opportunity inequality both reinforce the skills gap tech employers are facing today: openings for coders, but no one to fill them.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMo (Quartz)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aMp (KTVX)

 

‘Code to Success’ is giving students a head start on their career

SALT LAKE, Utah — Several hundred students got a head start this school year taking advantage of a free computer coding camp this past summer.
‘Code to Success’ is a 9 week course, free of charge to students. In its second year, the program is seeing a lot of success.
Joni Frodsham, 17, “at first, I wanted to work with computers all the time and type really fast and do cool stuff.”
17-year-old Bountiful High School Senior, Jodi Frodsham, spent her summer in a classroom. “It’s fun. I’ve got a coding brain.”
At times, you might think she’s speaking a foreign language, one that Joni knows like the back of her hand.
“Ruby on Rails includes html, java script, all you need to design a website and we did all that in one summer.”
Nearly 400 teens across 10 school districts in the state participated in ‘Code to Success.’
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMm (KTVX)

 

Logan High enters Pro Football Hall of Fame thanks to Merlin Olsen

Logan High School and one of the greatest Grizzlies of all time were recognized in a special ceremony full of Logan pride.
The Hometown Hall of Famer program presented by Ford Motor Company and the Pro Football Hall of Fame held a special ceremony for Merlin Olsen and his high school Thursday morning. Logan High was recognized as an “official high school of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.”
The Hometown Hall of Famer is a national program that “honors the hometown roots of the greatest heroes of the game.” Logan High is the 112th school to receive this status.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aM2 (LHJ)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aM3 (CVD)

 

Disabled Orem High football player realizes dream

OREM, Utah – Emmanuel Gualatuna started suffering seizures when he was two years old. Some lasted for several minutes. The seizures stopped when he was eight, but Emmnauel was left developmentally delayed.
“His brain does not function at 100 percent,” said Emannuel’s father, Edwin. “Maybe his brain is at 70 percent, but he’s learning.”
Emmanuel always had a passion for football, especially when he watched his older brother play at Orem High.
“He used to come up to me and say can we play football outside?” Emmanuel’s brother, Edwin Junior said. “Can we do anything related to football? Anything to do with football, he just loved doing it with me. He liked coming to my games or going to BYU games.”
So when Emmanuel wanted to play on the Orem High sophomore team, his father did not have any reservations.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aM4 (KTVX)

 

Oakridge Elementary cancels outdoor recess after cougar spotted in woods behind school

HOLLADAY, Utah – School officials decided to bring recess indoors after spotting a cougar behind the woods at Oakridge Elementary.
Granite School District said everyone is safe and accounted for but as a precaution they will keep students inside. “As we get closer to the end of school, we will have more information on how pick up is to occur based on whether animal control is able to find the animal,” school officials said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aM5 (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aMi (Gephardt Daily)

 

West High School dealing with bat problem

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – Classes went on as normal Thursday after a bat situation briefly closed the doors of West High School.
The school closed their doors Wednesday night “until it [was] determined that all the bats have been removed and access points into the school [were] secured”.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aM6 (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aM7 (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aMd (AP via New York Post)

 

Utah Education and Telehealth Network Announces Partnership with Instructure

On September 21, 2017, the Utah Education and Telehealth Network (UETN) announced a strategic collaboration with Instructure. The partnership will provide statewide access to Canvas, Instructure’s learning management system (LMS) for all public K-12 districts and charter schools. Under the plan, the UETN will cover the cost of Canvas subscriptions for the 2017 to 2018 school year, but there is hope that school’s statewide will permanently adopt Canvas moving forward.
The UETN is a well-established innovator in broadband and broadcast delivery of statewide educational and telehealth resources. Indeed, its network connects all Utah school districts and higher education institutions. The UETN has long has a mission to provide network application and support services not only to Utah’s K-12 schools but also to the state’s colleges and libraries, hospitals, clinics and health departments. Its recently announced partnership with Canvas is just the UETN’s most recent effort to promote online connectivity and education throughout the state of Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMn (eLearning Inside)

 

Staker Parson Companies Teaches Students How To Be Truck Smart
Staker Parson Companies joined a Utah Department of Transportation Zero Fatalities Truck Smart presentation at the Box Elder High School, in Brigham City, Utah Wednesday.

Staker Parson Companies joined a Utah Department of Transportation Zero Fatalities Truck Smart presentation at the Box Elder High School, in Brigham City, Utah Wednesday. The Truck Smart program educates drivers about the impact the trucking industry has on the economy and stresses that truck drivers need the community to drive safely around them to avoid crashes and fatalities on the road.
UDOT employee Katie “the truck lady” Lindley, teaches driver education students across Utah how to be Truck Smart. In Utah, 25 percent of vehicles on the road are large trucks, while most other states only have around 13 percent.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMq (PR Urgent)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Nine States Do Not Include Measures of Healthy Schools in ESSA’s Fifth Indicator
Huffington Post commentary by Deborah Temkin, Director, Education Research, Child Trends, and Kristen Harper, Senior Policy Specialist, Child Trends

The week of September 18 marked the final deadline for state education departments to submit their plans for implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) to the U.S. Department of Education. As part of these plans, states had to detail how they would address ESSA’s requirement to include an indicator of “School Quality or Student Success” as part of their school accountability systems (“fifth indicator”). In requiring states to designate this indicator alongside metrics of student performance (i.e., academic achievement, an additional academic indicator, graduation rates, and English language proficiency), Congress recognized the need for schools to improve the conditions in which children learn. Including measures of healthy school environments-both single indicators like chronic absenteeism and broader metrics such as school climate-helps ensure that schools focus on providing all students with the supports they need.
Child Trends conducted an initial scan of states’ proposed accountability systems to examine how each approached the fifth indicator. Although the vast majority of states selected at least one indicator-usually chronic absenteeism-to gauge how schools support students in areas beyond academic performance, a handful missed a critical opportunity to emphasize the importance of supporting children’s healthy development. Florida, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming opted to focus on additional academic indicators, such as growth among the lowest-performing students, science and social studies achievement, and AP/IB participation. While these measures are certainly laudable, the exclusion of indicators of student well-being sends a disturbing message to schools in these nine states.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMl

 

The School Climate Problem (and What We Can Do About It)
Students need emotional connection to school to be fully engaged
Education Week op-ed by Peter DeWitt, author, presenter, and former K-5 public school principal

The other day I was on a flight from Albany to San Jose, Calif., and I read an interview with Hilary Swank in Sky Magazine. Swank remarked that she grew up in a trailer park in Washington state, and although she never felt rich or poor, she understood “classism at a very young age.” She explained that she began to “feel like an outsider, when you’re told you don’t belong because of where you live.”
As I made my connection in Atlanta, so many questions popped into my mind as I approached the gate.
The interview stuck with me long after I returned the magazine to the back pocket of the seat. To me, it was about much more than Hilary Swank. It spoke to our expectations of teachers and leaders. It addressed school climate head on.
Was it just in her community she felt that way? Did she feel that way when she entered her school building as she went through her formative years of schooling? Did the feeling she remembers, even after two Oscars, have something to do with her school’s climate?
So, what is school climate? The National School Climate Center defines it this way: “The quality and character of school life and experiences that reflect norms, values, interpersonal relationships, teaching, learning, and leadership practices, and organizational structures; a sustainable, positive school climate fosters youth development and learning necessary for a productive, contributing, and satisfying life in a democratic society.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aM8

 

There’s a new call for Americans to embrace Chinese-style education. That’s a huge mistake.
Washington Post op-ed by Yong Zhao, Foundation Distinguished Professor in the School of Education at the University of Kansas

The Wall Street Journal recently published an article titled “Why American Students Need Chinese Schools?” by Lenora Chu, author of the newly released book, “Little Soldiers: An American Boy, a Chinese School, and the Global Race to Achieve.” The message is familiar, along the same lines as another Wall Street Journal article from several years ago titled “Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior.”
I would have easily discarded the article for its ludicrous title if I had not read the galley of the book before. I did not see any convincing evidence in the book that supports the proposal that American students need Chinese schools. Quite to the contrary, I understood the book as further evidence for not importing Chinese schools into America.
Little Soldiers is far from a love affair with Chinese schools as the title of the Wall Street Journal article suggests. It is, rather, a vivid portrayal of an outdated education model that does serious and significant damage.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMb

 

Oh my God! School bans student-led prayers at football games
Fox commentary by Todd Starnes, author of “The Deplorables’ Guide to Making America Great Again”

Faith and football go hand in hand across the fruited plain – especially in the great state of Alabama.
It’s not all that unusual for high school football games to start with a moment of prayer – an invocation.
The game announcer will ask folks to stand to their feet and remove their hats as the marching band belts out the Star-Spangled Banner. Then, he’ll hand the press box microphone to a student who will thank God and ask for His blessings upon the evening’s game.
It’s a longtime tradition – a beloved tradition where folks of all colors and backgrounds unite as one people – in public – before all you-know-what breaks loose on the field.
But that tradition has come to an abrupt end in Lee County, Alabama.
The school district recently announced that student-led prayers will no longer be permitted before high school football games.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMe

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Betsy DeVos Approves Massachusetts Plan for ESSA Implementation
Education Week

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced Thursday that she has approved Massachusetts’ plan for the Every Student Succeeds Act.
In a statement, DeVos praised the plan’s details on turning around low-performing schools and for emphasizing the share of high school students who complete accelerated courses such as Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate.
“I continue to be heartened by the ways in which states have embraced the flexibility afforded to them under ESSA,” DeVos said in her statement. She also praised the plan as a “testament” to the work of the late Commissioner of Education Mitchell Chester, who died earlier this year.
Massachusetts is the 14th state, along with the District of Columbia, to have its ESSA plan approved by the U.S. Department of Education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aLT

http://gousoe.uen.org/aLU (ED)

 

Florida’s ESSA Plan Leaves Out Struggling Student Scores in School Grades – but at What Cost?
The 74

Florida may be trying to skirt the law when it comes to its public education plan. The result could mean a delay or denial in federal education funding, an unscheduled overhaul of Florida’s school grades system, or a wink and a nod from a Trump administration which may not be very keen on enforcing the law.
The Every Student Succeeds Act says each state has to measure certain things for specific groups of students. For example, every state has to measure how many students are reading at grade level, but they also have to look at individual groups of students, who have often not been well served in school – like those from low-income families, those with disabilities, English language learners, and minorities – and factor their performance into the overall rating the state gives a school.
In Florida, officials initially wanted to ignore that requirement. They argued in a draft letter to the U.S. Department of Education (a letter that was made public, but never sent) that they wanted to keep doing what they had been doing: measuring the lowest-performing 25 percent of students regardless of their race, income level, or disability status.
But in late August, a spokesperson for Florida’s education department said the state was no longer sure a waiver (i.e., permission to bypass sections of the law) was necessary.
Then Wednesday, they released the state’s education plan, and, as expected, the request to bypass the part of the law requiring school grades to factor in race and income was gone.
But rather than adjust the plan to conform to the law, Florida’s plan essentially keeps its accountability system the same as it was: The state plans to report on the progress of students by race, income, etc., but not include their performance in the school grading system.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aLV

 

New York Has Rewritten the Common Core. Here’s What You Need to Know.
Education Week

New York leaders have approved a new set of reading and math expectations for students, moving the state a step away from the Common Core State Standards, which are still in use in some 36 states.
The new standards retain many of the common core’s key features. They still emphasize learning how to read and analyze increasingly complex texts, and how to learn problem-solving algorithms and model with math.
Educators are still parsing out precisely what some of the changes will mean for day-to-day instruction. Accompanying changes in curriculum, training, and testing are still months and years away.
The change caps an incredibly tumultuous seven years of policymaking in New York, much of which was wrapped up in the state’s successful push to win a $700 million Race to the Top grant. Political pressure led the state to weaken, although not eliminate, many of the things it agreed to do as part of the grant, including rating teachers’ performance in part on student test scores. The common-core standards, which were rolled out quickly and with what even supporters say was insufficient training, have now yielded to pressure, too.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aLY

 

Clark County teachers union, state parent group sue one another
Las Vegas Review-Journal

Infighting between the local and the state teachers union has moved to the courtroom with the filing of a pair of lawsuits.
Officials with the Clark County Education Association allege in a lawsuit filed Sept. 12 in District Court in Las Vegas and amended this week that the state breached its contract by not providing information about how members’ union dues are spent.
In return, state union officials from Nevada State Education Association and its national parent filed a complaint Thursday in District Court charging that the local breached its contract by withholding dues.
Clark County’s teacher members pay more than $4 million each year to the state union. But the local officials allege it has refused to provide details of how that money is spent.
“We’ve asked for information for eight months about how our dues are spent, I think members have a right to know how exactly that money is spent,” local union President Vikki Courtney told the Review-Journal Thursday.
Courtney said the issue was about fairness and transparency and insisted the local union was not looking to disaffiliate from the state union.
But the head of the state union, Ruben Murillo, said he believes that is precisely what the local is aiming to accomplish. He also said the local has endangered its membership through its actions, stating Clark County members no longer have access to legal representation because local officials have been withholding dues.
“CCEA is just playing with fire and God help any of our members who may need legal assistance during this time,” he said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aLS

 

Justice Sonia Sotomayor Aims to Expand Scope of Civics Education Efforts
Education Week

Washington — U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, speaking as the keynoter at a forum on civics education Thursday, stressed the importance of engaging young people of various backgrounds on the topic.
“For me, civic education is the key to inspiring kids to want to become and stay involved in making a difference,” Sotomayor told the Democracy at a Crossroads National Summit, a daylong event that drew scores of students, educators, policymakers, and others to the Newseum here.
The event was co-sponsored by iCivics, the nonprofit group founded by retired Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, which develops popular civics education games for classroom use such as “Do I Have a Right?”
“I could think of no better legacy” that O’Connor has left than her work on civics education, Sotomayor said. “She’s done so many other things, she’s affected so many other areas of the law in such positive ways. But the one that will live the longest is her work on the iCivics organization.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aM9

 

Austin to consider buying Montopolis Negro School, creating museum
Austin (TX) American-Statesman

The Austin City Council will decide next week whether to try to buy and preserve the Montopolis Negro School, potentially resolving a long-running debate over the fate of the historic property.
A proposed resolution on the council’s Sept. 28 agenda would direct city staffers to “negotiate acquisition of the property” and prepare a plan to restore the now-empty schoolhouse “as a historic asset and museum that would attract tourists and convention delegates.”
The resolution also specifies this would be done with hotel taxes, a portion of which the council recently diverted from Austin Convention Center and Visit Austin operations to make available instead for historic preservation efforts.
“The Montopolis Negro School is, to many of us in this community, invaluable – and its cultural and historical significance, undeniable,” Council Member Sabino “Pio” Renteria said in a statement Thursday.
The schoolhouse at 500 Montopolis Drive, in Renteria’s Southeast Austin district, is one of the last standing of 42 institutions that educated African-American children from 1935 to 1962 when Austin’s schools refused to do so.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMg

 

How California puts high school athletes at great risk
San Francisco Chronicle

As the sun sets and the Friday night lights go on at football fields across California this week, thousands of high school players will prepare to clash.
In the stands, proud parents will look down on the field nervously, outwardly willing their sons to succeed while inwardly praying for their safety.
Missing from the equation, in many of those games, will be certified athletic trainers to watch over the proceedings, ready to address anything from common injuries to life-threatening situations. That’s because California is the only state that does not require its high school athletic trainers to be certified in any way. The state doesn’t even require schools to have trainers at games. So many do not.
It’s a shocking revelation, at a time when injury awareness and concern is at an all-time high – especially in football. We’re worried about the long-term effect of concussions, but we’re not even staffing high school football games with trained professionals? It’s an absurd situation that could be easily rectified.
According to a recent study published in the Orthopedic Journal of Sports Medicine and conducted by the University of Connecticut’s Korey Stringer Institute, a nonprofit dedicated to minimizing preventable death on the playing field, California ranks second to last in the nation – ahead of only Colorado – when it comes to implementing policies that help prevent the leading causes of sudden death in high school athletes. That dismal result is directly tied to the state’s lack of a coherent policy on trainers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMh

 

Does England’s rapid expansion of charter-like ‘academies’ hold a lesson for the U.S.?
Chalkbeat

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos wants more schools to be free from what she characterizes as ineffective, bureaucratic rules.
“In too many places there isn’t the kind of autonomy at a building level to really kind of break out of that mold and do things differently to meet students’ needs,” DeVos said in a recent interview.
But is that autonomy itself likely to improve schools?
A new study offers a sobering answer: England’s mass conversion of primary schools to “academies,” which function in some ways like charter schools in the United States, did not produce any academic gains for students. (Incidentally, DeVos met this week with Jo Johnson, a United Kingdom education minister; a spokesperson for DeVos said the meeting focused on higher education.)
And although exporting lessons from other countries is an inherently fraught exercise, the English experience provides a cautionary tale – and aligns with research from the U.S. In short, there’s little evidence that providing schools with additional freedom will, on its own, boost student achievement.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aLW

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/aLX (Journal of Public Economics)

 

One in three Chinese children faces an education apocalypse. An ambitious experiment hopes to save them
Science

Glasses askew and gray hair tousled, Scott Rozelle jumps into a corral filled with rubber balls and starts mixing it up with several toddlers. The kids pelt the 62-year-old economist with balls and, squealing, jump onto his lap. As the battle rages, Rozelle chatters in Mandarin with mothers and grandmothers watching the action.
Elsewhere in this early childhood education center in central China, youngsters are riding rocking horses, clambering on a jungle gym, thumbing through picture books, or taking part in group reading. Once a week, caregivers get one-on-one coaching on how to read to toddlers and play educational games. The center is part of an ambitious experiment Rozelle is leading that aims to find solutions to what he sees as a crisis of gargantuan proportions in China: the intellectual stunting of roughly one-third of the population. “This is the biggest problem China is facing that nobody’s ever heard about,” says Rozelle, a professor at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California.
Surveys by Rozelle’s team have found that more than half of eighth graders in poor rural areas in China have IQs below 90, leaving them struggling to keep up with the fast-paced official curriculum. A third or more of rural kids, he says, don’t complete junior high. Factoring in the 15% or so of urban kids who fall at the low end of IQ scores, Rozelle makes a stunning forecast: About 400 million future working-age Chinese, he says, “are in danger of becoming cognitively handicapped.”
Among Chinese academics, that projection “is controversial,” says Mary Young, a pediatrician and child development specialist formerly of the World Bank Institute in Washington, D.C. But although experts may debate the numbers, they are united on the enormity of the problem. “There is definitely a tremendous urban-rural gap” in educational achievement, says Young, who is leading pilot interventions for parents of young children in impoverished rural areas for the government-affiliated China Development Research Foundation in Beijing.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMa

 

Mexico earthquake: Navy official apologizes over reports of trapped girl
CNN

Mexico City — A Mexican navy official has apologized for confusion over reports that a 12-year-old girl was trapped alive after a Mexico City school collapsed in the wake of a magnitude 7.1 earthquake that killed more than 280 people nationwide.
Those reports had riveted Mexicans pulling for an uplifting rescue when the temblor damaged the Enrique Rebsamen school Tuesday.
Rescue workers said Wednesday they believed they’d made contact with a girl trapped in the rubble at the school, where at least 19 children and six adults were killed.
For more than a day, rescuers told reporters they were trying to reach and free the girl — efforts that were shown live on television.
But by Thursday afternoon, navy official Angel Enrique Sarmiento said all the school’s children had been accounted for — either having died, been hospitalized or found safe — and there was no student in the rubble.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMc

 

Four in 10 parents ‘asked to give to school funds’
BBC

Four in 10 parents are being asked to contribute regularly to school funds in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, a survey suggests.
Schools have often asked parents for contributions to a school fund at the start of the year, the Parent Teacher Association UK said.
Its survey of 1,507 parents found a third regularly gave to school funds in the last year.
The Department for Education said no parent was obliged to contribute.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aMf

 

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UEN News
http://www.uen.org

October 12:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

October 13:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

October 17:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPEXE

October 18:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

November 1:

Education Interim Committee meeting
10 a.m., Utah Valley University, Orem
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

November 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
https://www.utahscsb.org/2017

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