Education News Roundup: Oct. 6, 2017

Today’s Top Picks:

Equality Utah and the State Board of Education settle the lawsuit over sex-ed policy in Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSK (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aSA (AP)
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSL (AP via DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aSB (KSTU)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/aSG (AP via Fox)

Utah Business looks at the outlook for education in Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSC (Utah Business)

Of the 700,000 DACA recipients in the U.S., an estimated 20,000 of them are teachers. What does this mean for schools?
http://gousoe.uen.org/aS2 (NPR)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Equality Utah, state schools settle lawsuit over anti-gay sex ed policies
So-called “no promo homo” law is out and state school board informing schools of anti-discrimination policy for all students.

Common ground, dialogue sought regarding Pride poetry workshops

Industry Outlook: Education

State Rep. Tim Quinn Wary of Our Schools Now Initiative

Should Alpine School District close 2 schools in Orem?

Faces of intergeneration poverty: program highlights success

Children are Learning to Code and are Taking Over the World

Skier Picabo Street operates her own private school in Park City

High schoolers paint blades to promote safety around snowplows

‘Teen Chef Pro’ hits the CW 30

Officials dispel rumors of shooting threat at Westlake High

An artist in everyone: Mount Logan teacher recognized in state award

Be your own hero at the Special Ed Extravaganza

Mt. Nebo Jr. High helps students in need

Lehi High School digs down to help staff member with loyal Lehi history

Mt. Loafer Elementary helps Hurricane Harvey victims

This Utah teacher appeared on ‘Rachel Ray’ after her wedding registry went viral

Nebo School District given Business of the Month honors

Sage Creek Chinese immersion students enchant Nebo School Board

Captains’ Academy empowers better sportsmanship and leadership

An ALC student project

Aviation photos donated to high school program

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Jackson Elementary is a wonderful school

All will benefit from passage of Ogden school bond

Vital schools are the lifeblood of a community

Cutting Deals With Trump: Will It Fly or Flop For Democrats on Education?

Making Broadband a Priority Makes Education Better

NATION

For DACA Teachers, Uncertainty Lingers On The Last Day To Renew

Study: Special Educators Accept Wide Swings in Special Education Enrollment

AIR Poised to Win Three State Testing Contracts Worth At Least $84 Million

For-Profit Schools Reward Students for Referrals and Facebook Endorsements
Schools for potential dropouts market aggressively to boost enrollment ? especially during weeks when heads are counted to determine funding. Some of their tactics may violate federal consumer protections.

Texas’ 2011 cuts to schools still being felt, reports finds

Farewell, Valedictorian: High Schools Drop Tradition of Naming Top Student
More institutions are naming multiple valedictorians — or none at all

Parents upset by multiple choice answer: ‘shooting at Trump’

Suburban school forfeits football game at Chicago park

For Traumatized Children, An Offer Of Help From The Muppets

Anxiety, depression greatest in younger kids with facial birth defects

2nd-grade hand hygiene experiment reduces school absenteeism by 71%

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Equality Utah, state schools settle lawsuit over anti-gay sex ed policies
So-called “no promo homo” law is out and state school board informing schools of anti-discrimination policy for all students.

Equality Utah has settled the first-of-its-kind lawsuit brought against the state of Utah over sex-education law that banned positive discussions of homosexuality in public schools.
A joint motion to dismiss the lawsuit was filed Thursday in Salt Lake City’s U.S. District Court. Judge Dee Benson is expected to grant the dismissal.
“It’s remarkable what has happened,” Equality Utah Executive Director Troy Williams said. “The Utah State Board of Education has made it clear that LGBTQ students must not be discriminated against.”
The settlement filing follows a Sept. 18 letter sent by the Utah State Board of Education to all public and charter schools that noted recent changes to state sex-education laws and the board’s subsequent revised policies.
In its letter, the board said it “desires each student in Utah public schools to receive a high quality education free from all manner of discrimination, which can take the form of bullying, based on religion, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and gender identity.”
To the extent that some old policies remain in place, schools must revise those now “invalid” rules so that they align with current law, the board said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSK (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aSA (AP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aSL (AP via DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aSB (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aSG (AP via Fox)

 

Common ground, dialogue sought regarding Pride poetry workshops

A firestorm of comment in the Moab community surrounding poetry workshops at Grand County High School (GCHS) has some residents calling for a community-wide dialogue on acceptance, compassion, and the need for common ground.
Themed “Identity and Inclusion,” the Moab Pride Steering Committee said the poetry workshops intended to spark critical thinking about identity in order to better understand how differences can help create more inclusive spaces. They were led by professional poets, some visiting for the Moab Pride Festival, during GCHS English classes on Sept. 28.
During one workshop, remarks made regarding sexual orientation caused some parents to raise red flags about classroom content in Utah public schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSE (Moab Times-Independent)

 

Industry Outlook: Education

The watchwords in education right now are collaboration, alignment and innovation. Here, education and industry leaders talk about how Utah’s educational system is transforming to align student competencies with industry needs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSC (Utah Business)

 

State Rep. Tim Quinn Wary of Our Schools Now Initiative

KPCW heard recently from a representative of Our Schools Now which is backing an initiative to boost education funding in Utah. In reaction to that, however, Rep, Tim Quinn (R) said he’s wary of the proposal that would mess too much with the state’s income taxes.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSI (KCPW) audio

 

Should Alpine School District close 2 schools in Orem?

OREM — After announcing a plan to close and consolidate a handful of elementary schools in Orem in September, Alpine School District officials are taking another month to decide whether or not the schools will be closed.
School board members will vote Nov. 14 on the future of Hillcrest and Scera Park elementary schools, Alpine School District Assistant Superintendent John Patten said on Sept. 29.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSo (KSL)

 

Faces of intergeneration poverty: program highlights success

SANDY, Utah – Alexus Martinez was stone-faced and matter-of-fact Monday as she described how she became homeless at age 16 and “learned not to depend on anyone else but myself.”
She said she grew up with role models addicted to drugs ? heroin and pain pills.
She said she’s watched as three of her six brothers also fell into the thralls of drug addiction.
To Martinez ? now 20, a single mother with a 1-year-old son, Aurelius ? that was their choice.
“They grew up just like me,” Martinez said. “They could have made the choice to go down that path like my parents or be successful. And they chose the wrong path.”
Martinez is one of nearly 40,000 adults in Utah who lived in intergenerational poverty in 2016, according to the state’s newest report released Oct. 2. When her son, Aurelius, was born, he was one of nearly 60,000 children.
Martinez said she dropped out of high school in 10th grade but decided to go back in 11th grade, even while she struggled to keep a roof over her head and afford to eat. She said she worked after school so she could pay for a motel room, but would sometimes have to eat at the homeless shelter downtown.
Eventually, she graduated early. But not without hardship.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aRZ (DN via AP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aS8 (AP via OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aSH (AP via USN&WR)

 

Children are Learning to Code and are Taking Over the World

A child you know may just be the one to invent the next big app, website, or video game.
Coding is one of the biggest to know skills of today, and Salt Lake City Library are teaching classes to children 8 to 18 how to learn this important skill.
The kids of the future are able to enroll in these Code Clubs and work at their own pace throughout the program. Kids not only learn how to develop computer programs, but also build off of one another creating a giant chain of innovation.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSp (KSTU)

 

Skier Picabo Street operates her own private school in Park City

PARK CITY – Former World Cup Skiing Champion and Olympic Gold Medalist Picabo Street has added a new title – School Founder.
A little over a year ago she started the Picabo Street Academy, an academic center tailored for athletes, artists or anyone who can’t be in a classroom seven hours a day, five days a week, nine months a year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSJ (KTVX)

 

High schoolers paint blades to promote safety around snowplows

LAYTON — Snowplows already have been on the roads this fall in the state’s high-elevation communities, and the Utah Department of Transportation is well into winter preparations.
And motorists may notice something different this year about the large trucks as crews clear snow from Utah roads. It’s part of the Paint a Plow program, where high school students decorate the blades of the plows to remind drivers to give them some space.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSD (DN)

 

‘Teen Chef Pro’ hits the CW 30

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah — Four time Emmy Award winning show ‘Teen Chef Pro’ is making its way to Utah’s CW 30. Teen Chef Pro’s Director and Producer, Katy Sine joined Good Morning Utah with Brian Carlson to share what you can expect for the upcoming season.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSn (KTVX)

 

Officials dispel rumors of shooting threat at Westlake High

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Officials dispelled rumors of a shooting threat at Westlake High School that floated around social media Thursday and Friday.
The rumors were likely sparked after a student brought an unloaded gun to school earlier in the week, according to Saratoga Springs Police Chief Gregory Veitch.
The student told police and school administration they brought the gun only to show friends. The student has since been suspended. School officials declined to give additional details about the student, including their age or gender. Police are now working with the county attorney to determine whether charges will be filed, Veitch said.
Police believe this incident is what propagated the rumors of a shooting threat, which began on Thursday when a screenshot of a text, claiming a student was going to bring a gun to school on Friday, circulated on Snapchat and other social media.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSl (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aSm (KTVX)

 

An artist in everyone: Mount Logan teacher recognized in state award

The moment students at Mount Logan Middle School walk into John Westenskow’s ceramics class, they become artists. The hard part is making them believe it.
Westenskow, who was recently recognized as the Utah Middle School Art Teacher of the Year, said the idea of who can be an artist is a cultural phenomenon. There’s often a notion that being an artist means being able to reproduce a scene and make it look realistic, but in his class, art means making something new and thinking outside of the box.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSk (LHJ)

 

Be your own hero at the Special Ed Extravaganza

Ammon Allred, who is confined to a wheelchair, bent over as far as possible and rolled the bowling ball into the pins ahead of him. When he realized he had knocked them down all at once, his face lit up and he expressed his joy with a yell. His coach joined in his happiness, high-fiving him and patting him on the back. Ammon attends Payson Junior High, in Payson, Utah.
The Special Education Extravaganza was held Wednesday, September 20, at Diamond Fork Junior High in Spanish Fork, Utah. What began as a dream to have a special needs class participate in an intramural program, the Extravaganza has become an anticipated district-wide event that involves every junior high school special needs student in the Nebo District.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSe (Serve Daily)

 

Mt. Nebo Jr. High helps students in need

Many of the students at Mt. Nebo Jr. High School lack the basic nutrition and school supplies to successfully participate in class on a daily basis. We are currently fed by all Title I elementary schools and so our need is tremendous, with over 50% of our students currently qualifying as economically disadvantaged. At MNJHS, we are constantly working to provide our students with bagged food kits, warm clothing, and even basic school supplies.
To meet those needs, MNJHS is excited to announce the creation of an in-school dedicated “Panther Pantry” to help our at-risk, homeless and low-income students. With the creation of our new Panther Pantry, our students will be able to get free gently used or new clothing, including warm winter coats, bagged food kits so they have food to get them through the weekend and school supplies. School should be a refuge from the storms of poverty. Our students will be able to get some of that extra protection from our new pantry.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSf (Serve Daily)

 

Lehi High School digs down to help staff member with loyal Lehi history

Lehi High School students banded together Thursday to help one of their own with her cancer struggle.
Peggy Lewis, counseling secretary at Lehi High, is struggling with bladder cancer, and the school’s student council, sports marketing team and girls volleyball team have banded together to raise money to help Lewis.
“She graduated from Lehi in 1969, married her high school sweetheart ? who was the student body president at Lehi then, and she has multiple grandkids that have graduated and plan on graduating from Lehi,” said Braydon Carter, sports marketing president. “She’s been here forever, and she and her husband have been super pro-Lehi the whole time.”
Carrying empty coffee, paint and food storage cans, and adorned with pink balloons that whipped around in the wind, the three school groups collected pocket change immediately after school Thursday, as students streamed out of the school and headed home.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSb (PDH)

 

Mt. Loafer Elementary helps Hurricane Harvey victims

Mt. Loafer Elementary recently held a fundraiser for victims of Hurricane Harvey. The school designated an official “Helping Hands for Harvey Day” in which students and faculty dressed as a “Texan” and were asked to donate $1 to schools devastated by the hurricane.
Donations came flying in and by the next morning, Mt Loafer was able to send $1,567.13 to a school district in Texas.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSc (Serve Daily)

 

This Utah teacher appeared on ‘Rachel Ray’ after her wedding registry went viral

Copper Hills High School teacher Rickee Stewart made a unique decision when she registered for wedding gifts.
She decided to register for coats instead because she wanted to give them to her students.
The Utah teacher recently appeared on the “Rachel Ray Show,” which is her most recent appearance on network television, to talk about her decision. She previously appeared on “NBC Nightly News,” where she shared her story about helping her students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aS6 (DN)

 

Nebo School District given Business of the Month honors

Nebo School District was awarded “Business of the Month” by the Spanish Fork and Salem Chamber of Commerce in September.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSh (Serve Daily)

 

Sage Creek Chinese immersion students enchant Nebo School Board

Principal Alison Hansen addressed the Nebo School Board of Education at the September board meeting highlighting the rigorous courses at Sage Creek Elementary School in Springville . The presentation particularly emphasized the immense success of their Chinese Immersion Program.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSj (Serve Daily)

 

Captains’ Academy empowers better sportsmanship and leadership

Captains and student leaders from six high schools and seven junior high schools attended the Nebo School District’s Fall Academy. The purpose of the Captains’ Academy is to promote sportsmanship between the schools. This goal is realized through the captains and leaders working together at the academy to promote better relations between the students and athletes, to develop leadership through the academy activities, and to develop relationships with coaches and administrators as they present at each academy.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSg (Serve Daily)

 

An ALC student project

SALEM – The Nebo School District Advanced Learning Center, located at 161 East 400 North in Salem, provides learning opportunities limited only by your imagination. In August, the facility had a ribbon cutting dedication ceremony. In September, the facility had an open house for the general public.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSd (Serve Daily)

 

Aviation photos donated to high school program

The Advanced Learning Center (ALC) provides early college and career courses to Nebo School District students, offering a wide variety of advanced learning opportunities. One of these courses is Aviation, taught by Mark Halls who is a former pilot at Diamond Flight Center at the Springville/Spanish Fork Airport.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSi (Serve Daily)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Jackson Elementary is a wonderful school
Deseret News letter from Neal Patwari

I’m happy to see such interest in our school, Jackson Elementary (“Salt Lake area school seeks distance from its controversial namesake,” Sept. 27). I’m a parent of a Jackson student and a volunteer in our School Community Council.
Over the past year, our parents have engaged the SLC School District policy to rename our school, used 13 different methods to get feedback and received over 150 comments from our community members. I assure you that we did nothing “quietly.” What I feel is lacking from the article is a reporting of ? beyond the name change ? how amazing our school is.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aS7

 

All will benefit from passage of Ogden school bond
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Noel Zabriskie

I write in full support of the Ogden School District bond election. After studying the issues, I am convinced that the building and remodeling proposed will contribute to the future of Ogden school students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aS9

 

Vital schools are the lifeblood of a community
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Terrence Bride

Ogden will have an opportunity to vote on a school bond in the amount of $106.5 million to build new schools in our community. As a parent who had five children go through Ogden City schools, I strongly urge you to consider the advantages of investing in our children and our community.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSa

 

Cutting Deals With Trump: Will It Fly or Flop For Democrats on Education?
Education Week analysis by Andrew Ujifusa

What can Democrats in Congress do to make the best of a bad hand in pushing their education agenda?and where does the president fit in?
Hemmed in by a Republican-controlled Congress and President Donald Trump, the top Democrats in the Senate and House have been working to parry GOP advance in other policy areas, with a willingness to deal with Trump when it serves their interests. Prime example: the deal Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi struck with Trump last month to raise the debt ceiling and keep the federal government running through the rest of 2017.
The move stunned GOP leadership, and it’s led us to ask: If Trump is willing to cut that kind of deal with a party he frequently blasts, are there any deals to be had on education and education-related issues?
Based on conversations with some folks in the K-12 world, along with news developments, here are a few areas where there could be enough common ground in theory for Democrats to strike some kind of deal with Trump, along with bills Democrats have introduced:
http://gousoe.uen.org/aS3

 

Making Broadband a Priority Makes Education Better
Real Clear Education op-ed by Nate Davis, Executive Chairman of K12 Inc.

It is no secret that our country’s bridges, roads, railways and airports must be improved. Rebuilding our transportation infrastructure is critical to commercial and economic growth. But digital access in the internet age is just as important as the expressway needed for daily commutes and shipping goods.
Access to the “Information Highway” is essential. Yet, even today, too many American families can’t get on this road. According to a 2017 Wireless Broadband Alliance report, a troubling 23 percent of individuals and families living in urban areas, along with 28 percent in rural areas, don’t have access to or can’t afford broadband. Pew Research Center found that, overall, only 73 percent of U.S. households have broadband service.
That’s unacceptable. Such a widespread lack of access in the most technology-rich country in the world creates depressing fiscal and educational conditions for American citizens who don’t have internet.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSx

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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For DACA Teachers, Uncertainty Lingers On The Last Day To Renew
NPR

There are nearly 700,000 people in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, and Thursday is the final deadline for them to renew their DACA status, which the Trump Administration announced would be discontinued unless Congress steps in to save it.
With an application fee of $465, the program allows the recipients, often called DREAMers, to renew their temporary two-year work permits. But with no contingency plan, many are left with a feeling of uncertainty.
Another word for that is limbo. And that’s how three teachers that NPR Ed spoke with described their feelings after the Trump Administration announced last month that the program, which protects young people who came to the country illegally, would end.
The Department of Education doesn’t keep records on how many teachers are protected by DACA, but there are an estimated 20,000 teachers eligible to apply for DACA, according to data from The Migration Policy Institute, a nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. According to Teach For America, there are 188 DACA teachers working for that organization which places young teachers in low-income schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aS2

 

Study: Special Educators Accept Wide Swings in Special Education Enrollment
Education Week

Despite wide variation in the percentage of students enrolled in special education, a majority of teachers, principals and special administrators in a given state feel that the classification rates are largely on target, says a new report from Frontline Learning and Research Institute.
More than 17 percent of the students who live in Maine, Massachusetts, New York, and Pennsylvania are enrolled in special education, far outstripping the classification rates in other states, according to federal data. In contrast, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, and Texas?the four states with the lowest percentage of students in special education?have classification rates around 10 percent or less.
Most educators and principals feel these numbers are correct, even though they deviate from the national average of special education enrollment, 12 percent.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aS4

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/aS5 (Frontline Research & Learning Institute)

 

AIR Poised to Win Three State Testing Contracts Worth At Least $84 Million
Education Week

The American Institutes for Research is poised to land three new testing contracts?two of them worth a combined $74 million?in deals that underscore the continued demand from states overhauling high-stakes assessments.
The Washington-based testing vendor has been given notice that it has won contracts with Indiana, worth $43 million, and another with Iowa, valued at $31 million.
In addition, the AIR was selected this week for state testing work in North Dakota, pending an appeal process. The base contract is worth $10 million over five years, state officials say.
In all three states, the contract awards aren’t final until after the vendors not chosen are given the opportunity to appeal or protest the decisions.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSw

 

For-Profit Schools Reward Students for Referrals and Facebook Endorsements
Schools for potential dropouts market aggressively to boost enrollment ? especially during weeks when heads are counted to determine funding. Some of their tactics may violate federal consumer protections.
Pro Publica

Lyla Elkins transferred to North Nicholas High School in Cape Coral, Florida, in 2016 with hopes of sailing through its computer-based courses and graduating early. She didn’t realize the for-profit charter school would also be a source of income: a $25 gift card each time she persuaded a new student to enroll.
“I referred almost all of my friends,” said Elkins, 17, who earned three gift cards. She also won a Valentine’s Day teddy bear in a raffle for sharing one of the school’s Facebook posts.
Such incentives are rampant among for-profit operators of public alternative high schools like North Nicholas, which serves students at risk of dropping out. These schools market aggressively to attract new students, especially during weeks when the state is tallying enrollment for funding purposes. They often turn their students into promoters, dangling rewards for plugs on social media, student referrals or online reviews, a ProPublica-USA Today investigation found. Some also offer valuable perks simply for enrolling.
The schools’ reality is often less inspiring than their promotions. While they face a daunting mission of salvaging students who struggled elsewhere, they’re characterized by high absenteeism, low graduation rates, little instruction from teachers and few extracurricular activities or elective classes. Their intensive recruitment, when coupled with poor outcomes, “is wrong on so many levels,” said Samuel E. Abrams, a professor at Columbia Teachers College and author of a 2016 book on for-profit education. “It’s not addressing the pedagogical needs of these kids.”
It’s legal for schools to provide gift cards to students for referrals, and free electronic devices, such as tablets or computers, to newcomers. And students are free to express their opinions on their schools. But advertisements have less protection under the First Amendment, and some for-profit school promotions involving online posts or reviews may violate federal consumer safeguards.
According to the Federal Trade Commission, companies that use students and other groups as social media marketers should instruct them to disclose publicly that they expect to be paid. In settlements with the FTC, companies that failed to encourage such disclosures have agreed to follow the law — or face a potential penalty of up to $40,000 per transgression. Those instances didn’t involve students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSy

 

Texas’ 2011 cuts to schools still being felt, reports finds
Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas — The Legislature’s $5-plus billion in 2011 cuts to public education mean that Texas’ classroom funding still lags behind its pre-Great Recession levels due to booming enrollment growth ? with low-income students hit hardest.
That’s the conclusion of a report released Thursday by University of Texas professor Michael Marder and Chandra Villanueva, of the left-leaning Center for Public Policy Priorities.
They found that, despite increased funding more recently, bringing 2016′s public education funding levels up to 2008′s would require an extra $3.2 billion.
That meant middle schools spent $268 per-student less and high schools spent $428 less.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aS0

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/aS1 (Center for Public Policy Priorities)

 

Farewell, Valedictorian: High Schools Drop Tradition of Naming Top Student
More institutions are naming multiple valedictorians — or none at all
Wall Street Journal

Ryan Walters has loaded up on advanced classes, studied until the wee hours and composed possible graduation speeches in his head as the high-school junior worked to be valedictorian at Heritage High School in Wake Forest, N.C.
But neither he nor any of his classmates will hold the title.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSz $

 

Parents upset by multiple choice answer: ‘shooting at Trump’
Jackson Hole (WY) News & Guide

Parents are upset about politics’ pervasiveness in the classroom.
One of the answers a Jackson Hole High School English teacher gave her students on a multiple choice quiz Thursday was “A) He was shooting at Trump.”
Teton County School District No. 1 confirmed the answer was on a quiz administered online by their secure learning management system. The quiz has since been taken down.
Jim McCollum was surprised when his son Rylee McCollum, a junior, came home and showed him a screenshot of the online test.
“I had to read it two times,” McCollum said. “I was like, ‘Are you kidding me?'”
McCollum, a self-described conservative who voted for President Donald Trump, said that while he “cringes at some of the things he says,” the question was completely out of line.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSu

 

Suburban school forfeits football game at Chicago park
Associated Press

CHICAGO — A suburban Chicago high school says safety concerns have prompted it to forfeit a football game against a school on Chicago’s West Side.
St. Francis High School in Wheaton was scheduled to play Chicago Hope Academy on Friday night. But officials at St. Francis say a recent shooting, along with gunshots reported near Little League games at a local park over the summer, convinced the school to keep its team at home.
Chicago Hope Academy played a game at the park on Sept. 29 against another Chicago school that was interrupted by gunfire. No one was injured.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSv

For Traumatized Children, An Offer Of Help From The Muppets
NPR

Cookie Monster is all wound up. The Count has him hold up his furry blue fingers, count them (of course), and blow on each one in turn as if he were blowing out a birthday candle. Afterward, Cookie declares, in his familiar growly voice, that he feels much better.
“Hey! Me feel terrific! Me calm. Me relaxed.”
You won’t be catching this scene on HBO or PBS. It’s part of a special initiative called Sesame Street in Communities. Free materials, including videos, books and games, will be released today to help parents and caregivers, in turn, help young children cope with traumatic experiences.
The science of adverse childhood experiences, or ACEs for short, is beginning to transform education and social services. ACEs include poverty, abuse and neglect, domestic violence, divorce, and mental illness or substance abuse on the part of a caregiver.
A new analysis of the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health, released today, shows that nearly half of American children experience at least one of these adversities, and 1 in 5 have had at least two. Research shows that growing up with more ACEs negatively affects children’s development, education, and even later in life, chronic disease and longevity. But children’s brains are also resilient, and they can recover with the right kind of responsive care.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSq

http://gousoe.uen.org/aSs (ABC)

http://gousoe.uen.org/aSr (Sesame Street in Communities)

 

Anxiety, depression greatest in younger kids with facial birth defects
Reuters

Elementary school children with cleft lip, cleft palate and other facial anomalies may struggle more than older kids with anger, anxiety, depression and stress, according to a recent study.
Compared to older kids and teens, those between ages 8 and 10 have the highest risk for psychosocial dysfunction, the study team reports in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.
“The ultimate goal for all of us who work in craniofacial surgery is to help kids feel better and grow up normally,” said senior author Dr. Justine Lee of the University of California, Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine.
“At first, we weren’t looking for differences in age but other factors such as health insurance, socioeconomic status or how many surgeries they had over time,” she told Reuters Health in a telephone interview. “It surprised us to find out how tough elementary school was, realizing somebody else is different and noticing your own differences.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSt

 

2nd-grade hand hygiene experiment reduces school absenteeism by 71%
Healio

SAN DIEGO — The CDC has described hand-washing as a “do-it-yourself” vaccine. Researchers here showed how it can prevent absenteeism among elementary school students.
According to findings presented at IDWeek, school absences plummeted 71% among second graders at a Virginia elementary school after researchers taught the students how to properly wash their hands, then culture them to detect microbial contamination.
Kavita Imrit-Thomas, DO, associate medical director of LifeNet Health in Virginia Beach, Virginia, and colleagues gave the students a hands-on role in the experiment, which took place this past January.
“They were the scientists,” Imrit-Thomas said during a press conference announcing the findings. “Just to have the kids feeling and seeing and smelling the results of their experiment really made an impact.”
According to the CDC, 160 million school days are lost each year due to infectious illnesses ? absences that may be avoided by hand-washing. Done properly, the CDC says hand-washing can help reduce the spread of diarrheal and respiratory illnesses.
For their experiment, Imrit-Thomas and colleagues instructed 90 second graders in five classes at a Virginia Beach public school how to wash their hands according to CDC recommendations. The five-step process instructs people to wash, lather, scrub, rinse and dry their hands.
They talked to the students about important times for hand-washing, such as before eating, after going to the bathroom and after blowing their nose, and placed posters near each sink to help the students remember the best way to clean their hands.
For the experiment, they had the students culture their hands in Petri dishes filled with agar and then separated them into two groups: half washed their hands with soap, and half used alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Afterward, the students re-cultured their hands.
http://gousoe.uen.org/aSF

 

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CALENDAR
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UEN News
http://www.uen.org

October 11:

Utah State Board of Education Finance Committee meeting
6 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

October 12:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

October 13:

Utah State Board of Education committee meetings
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

Utah State Board of Education-Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind Advisory Council joint meeting
1:30 p.m., 1655 E 3300 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

October 17:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPEXE

October 18:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

November 1:

Education Interim Committee meeting
10 a.m., Utah Valley University, Orem
https://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=INTEDU

November 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
https://www.utahscsb.org/2017

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