Education News Roundup: May 23, 2017

Voices for Utah Children report looks at inequities in school discipline. Utah and Mexico update a child custody agreement. U’s College of Education earns high marks in new report. Sen. Ipson offers a thank you for teachers. Book Cliff Elementary Principal Jones offers a thank you for the community. Secretary DeVos offers a preview of the federal education budget due out today. AP wonders what will become of the quiet agreements schools have worked out with the parents of transgendered students over restroom use if the new Texas bathroom bill passes. All that and more in today’s Education News Roundup. . . . → Read More

Education News Roundup: May 17, 2017

Voices for Utah Children issues a new report on how children of color are faring in the state. Ed Week wraps up last week’s ed tech conference in Salt Lake. Money being raised through the Park City Education Foundation to help Latino students apply for protections. Congratulations to Carbon Supt. Steve Carlsen who will be the new Box Elder superintendent come July. Utah looks to spend some of its Volkswagen settlement on new school buses. U.S. House committee advances a new CTE bill. All that and more in today’s Education News Roundup. . . . → Read More

Education News Roundup: April 28, 2017

The 2017 Utah Children’s Budget Report from Voices for Utah Children is out. It includes information on education spending in Utah. If you want better grades consider emulating Buddy Rich or John Bonham? Herald Journal looks into grades at Spring Creek Middle School. Former NASA Astronaut Jose Hernandez speaks with high school students at the Latinos in Action Conference in Salt Lake. Apple, Google, and Microsoft are fighting it out for dominance in the ed tech market. All that and more in today’s Education News Roundup. . . . → Read More

Utah Promotes Attendance Awareness Month

Utah State Office of Education Logo

As many as 7.5 million U.S. students are chronically absent each year, meaning they miss 10 percent of the school year or nearly a month of school. These absences — whether they are excused, unexcused or for disciplinary reasons — add up to academic trouble and reduce the likelihood that a student will graduate from high school. . . . → Read More